Wednesday, February 24, 2010

I stick with my interpretation...

I inquired to the ITF regarding the "triple zero" tests. Here is my letter and the reply:

From: Tehaspe Forshur [mailto:tennisroids@gmail.com]
Sent: 23 February 2010 01:44
To: Reception
Subject: 2009 Out-of-competition Testing Question of Results

ITFTennis.com Feedback From About the ITF Weblet. Message follows:

Several of the "out-of-competition" tests noted for players do not have the type of test they recieved, with a "Zero" under each category: "Urine," "Blood" and "EPO." In what way were they tested if not one of these 3 methods?


Hello,

Thank you for your email.

The results you are referring to were missions that resulted, for whatever reason, in no sample being collected.

Regards

Holly


Holly Flatley | Anti-Doping Assistant
+ International Tennis Federation | Bank Lane, Roehampton, London SW15 5XZ, UK

17 comments:

  1. Wow, that's interesting. They have since deleted all the triple zeroes, btw. Can you post the triple zeroes here so we'll have a permanent record? Good job!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sometimes I wonder if when the tennis players blow off a test, the drug they're actually using is something like coke ala Gasquet.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Still, I don't understand why Soderling, Wickmayer and Malisse's tests are NOT recorded as triple zeroes!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Why the hell doesn't any journalist delve into this further ? For someone with access to the pros, it would be easy to ask them if they were tested on this day, and if not, why. And I'd like to know also from the ITF why the tests were not performed. Perhaps there's an anodine explanation, like the tester couldn't reach the athlete, but we cannot be sure...

    ReplyDelete
  5. The problem is that there are potentially innocent explanations and not-so-innocent explanations. Now all of the triple 0 players are tarred with the same brush because the ITF is doing its standard head in the sand routine.

    Great job finding this stuff!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Roger Federer is on the list.
    What a pity... Ha, ha, ha.
    And he has withdrawn from a Masters tournament, without giving any serious reason, before "missing that test".

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wickmayer and Malisse's missed tests were NOT ITF drug tests.
    It was testing carried out by their federation. Some of the federations do list testing and results on its websites.

    Definition of missed test:
    Missed Test: A failure by the Athlete to be available for Testing at the location and
    time specified in the 60-minute time slot identified in his/her Whereabouts Filing for
    the day in question, in accordance with Clause 11.4 or Clause 11.5.6.
    National Federation: A national non-governmental organization administering one

    here are the rules for the 09 season:
    http://www.itftennis.com/shared/medialibrary/pdf/original/IO_38259_original.PDF

    Cocaine is not on the Out-of-Competition banned list. Part of Gasquet's defense in front of the tribunal was he withdrew from the tournament; thereby he was ooc, so his positive test should be thrown out.

    While I do question the continued lack of EPO testing, The player can miss up to three tests, so that player doesn't need an explantion.
    I call bullshit on taking down the triple zeros. Please tell me someone downloaded it.
    KEEP IN MIND the numbers do change after it's released. Last year, the numbers did not add up.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I like the name you used...next time use Mike Hunt!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Does anyone actually believe that after winning the Career Grand Slam and breaking Sampras' record, Federer would take steroids (they don't test for EPO) during the meaningless fall indoor season?!

    Let's consider the dates of Federer's out of competition tests. Federer took one on May 19, 2009, 5 days before the start of the French Open.

    His "missed test" was October 28, 2009, 5 days before the start of the Basel tournament which had testing. He wound up being tested on November 7, a mere 10 days after the missed test. But he could have been tested as early as November 4th had he lost earlier. So why would Fed have drugs in his system a week before he could be tested when he was clean before a much more important tournament?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Baba,

    Are you suggesting what I think you're suggesting?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Nevermind, I thought you meant he made up the name Holly Flatley. I guess you meant the Tehaspe Forshur name.

    ReplyDelete
  12. "Does anyone actually believe that after winning the Career Grand Slam and breaking Sampras' record, Federer would take steroids (they don't test for EPO) during the meaningless fall indoor season?!"
    No, but you can't know what he was thinking.
    His withdrawing from Shanghai was weird because if Nadal would have performed well enough then, he could have taken the first spot back. And Federer wants to break Pete's consecutive weeks as number one record too. Not to mention that Federer performed really bad during that rest of the year.
    And if Nadal missed that test because he was on steroids and wasn't really injured, I don't understand why couldn't he perform at Wimbledon, since by that time he knew that there would be testing and I suppose that he was well prepared for that.

    ReplyDelete
  13. The NFL wants to test for HGH. The union doesn't want to. Wonder why?

    http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4940922

    ReplyDelete
  14. Great going THASP! You rock!

    ReplyDelete
  15. The date of Federer's missed test is just way too close to the Basel tournament for me to suspect him. I just don't see how any player would be stupid enough to have PED's detectable in their bodies just 5 days before a tournament.

    And you have to remember that the players are only allowed to miss three tests in an 18 month period. So you HAVE to be clean during some part of the year. .

    IMO, the two most likely time periods for players to use steroids are:

    July after Wimbledon (most players take 4-5 weeks off before their next event)

    The offseason (5-8 weeks at the end of the year)

    If a player doped during this time of the year, but then got clean around the tournaments and the fall, then they could pass their tests.

    ReplyDelete
  16. "And you have to remember that the players are only allowed to miss three tests in an 18 month period."

    I don't understand how come they can miss three tests since they are only tested once or twice a year. Does this make any sense?

    ReplyDelete
  17. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete