Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Doping Control: 2009 Wimbledon (Qualifying and Main Draws)

At this point, no explanation is required. Here is the testing conducted at Wimbledon 2009 for the qualifying, men's singles & doubles, and women's singles & doubles draws. No surprises. All the tests were conducted on match losers (or withdrawals) with the exception of champions. The only complication is that in a few instances a player had multiple matches on the same day, so I couldn't pin down exactly the match for which the test was conducted. However, the rules still held, so it wasn't an issue. Let me know if you find any errors.






As always, my data sources are provided below for those who want to verify my results and for those who don't want to believe their eyes.

Data Sources
Players tested and test dates: ITF's 2009 Anti-Doping Programme Statistics
Win/loss and Round Info #1: Wikipedia
Win/loss and Round Info #2: Tennis Explorer

20 comments:

  1. Some odd goings-in with Dopovic's match this morning. Seemed to be struggling to breath at times, doubling over etc.

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    1. Q. You clutched your hamstring and seemed to be in real pain for a moment. Was it a pulled hamstring? What was the problem?

      NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Well, luckily for me it wasn't something that stayed there for long time. It was just a, you know, sudden pain...

      Q. Before the really big matches, what strategies do you employ, breathing through the nose like Yoga, something like that?

      NOVAK DJOKOVIC: Yes, definitely, different kinds. I'll have to keep that for myself (smiling).

      http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/interviews/2012-01-25/201201251327495444717.html

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  2. Sharapova looking extremely pumped this time around.

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  3. During the Federer/Nadal match ESPN's Chris Fowler said that during the Nadal/Berdych match Nadal was playing too far behind the baseline until "Uncle Toni stood up and told Rafa to move closer to the baseline.....which is blatant coaching.....but hardly ever called," to which McEnroe said "yep." A few points later Federer hit a winner and the camera cut to Uncle Toni who was clapping...at which point either Cahill or McEnroe said "Uncle Toni is such a class act."

    Q: Can a cheater be a class act?

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  4. ...and as always, Nadal's bad knees are totally hindering his movement. He's only able to play with power from 15' wide of the double's alley to 15' wide of the other double's alley. Thankfully for Nadal fans he has such perfect form, technique and fundamentals that his game doesn't require speed, quickness, stamina or strength.

    Seriously though I'll be happy when this tournament is over so I don't have to hear any ESPN announcers tell the story of Rafa sitting in a chair in his hotel room getting a shooting pain in his knee that made him cry and worry that he wasn't going to be able to play the AO..and did I mention he was sitting in a chair when it happened...perhaps that's why he didn't enter the wheelchair draw...sitting down is too hard on his knees??

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  5. Dr Fuentes would have been proud of his protege this evening. And such courage, playing through his manifest injuries! How can Federer be considered the best player in history if he can't defeat a one-legged player?

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  6. Federer can only beat Nadal indoors at the end of the season. That's it.

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  7. What a difference 3 grams can make! Any one else excited for another year of Nadal-Djokovic Slam finals? Who will have the upper hand in the doping arms race this year?

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  8. Nadal: '24 hours to play my first match, I was in my room crying cause I believe I didn't had the chance to play Melbourne. A great effort'

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  9. With 3 games left in the match Nadal's AVERAGE time between serve was 30 seconds....if the average is 5 seconds over the allotted time that means there were only a handful of times he actually served within the allotted time....however, not even a "soft" warning was issued....yet Del Potro (against Federer) was given 2 "soft" warnings in the first set for the exact same pace of play (after which he did speed up his play)....keep in mind the average of 30 sec includes all the times between 1st and 2nd serves which keeps the overall average lower....his actual average time between 1st serves is probably more like 35 sec...that's deplorable....even more deplorable is Cahill's comment that "Rafa is so good at taking his time after he loses a point or misses a shot...."....SO GOOD AT IT?....he's good at cheating??

    Only 2 months ago on the purest court in tennis with indoor conditions Nadal couldn't hit a forehand winner against Federer....yet outdoors he hit more FH winners than Federer.....only 2 months ago on that same court he couldn't chase down Federer's forehands in the corner, yet last night he ran down everything for 4 hours, less than 48 hours after running down everything from Berdych for 4 hours...wonder what changed??

    Are we really supposed to believe the great Rafa hits the ball harder and more effectively when there IS wind, but when there is no wind he struggles and leaves shots short and gets pounded mercilessly and looks like a top-50 instead of a top 2?

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    1. Rafa's team has created the perfect doping schedule that's tailor-made for peaking at Grand Slams. I don't know how he does it or why he's never caught but I'd bet my dog (and I love my dog) that there is a lot more than blood coursing through those bulging veins of his. That's why he always does so poorly at the end of the season. Well I mean I know this has been said here a million times before but it doesn't hurt to remind people every once in a while:) And all his talk of injury is a pathetic attempt to cover up his blatant cheating. Who believes him? Seriously! I know a certain sportswear company that stands a lot to gain from this guy and wouldn't take kindly to him getting busted for drug use. Need I say more? Obviously Fed is aging and won't always be the meal ticket so on to his replacement: the cheating Mallorcan.

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    2. Totally agree, Lopi...totally agree.

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  10. It's all in the beef. Like Contador says.

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  11. I can't help it... I feel sorry for Roger. I know I could not play against Rafa (and others) and keep silent but then I am not making millions of dollars per year playing a game. Still, it has to hurt...

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  12. As much as I dislike Djokovic, I have to give him credit for out-doping Nadal. I guess all things being equal Djoker is the more talented player which is why he owned Nadal last year. Let's hope he owns him again this year and then someone else can come along and own Djoker. Pathetic.

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  13. I think Murray and Federer should go and play their own Australian final. It might make them feel better and it would certainly be more fun to watch.

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  14. Swisscheese,

    Awesome post dude.

    I think if the US Open or Australian Open was changed to a lightning fast indoor court and the world's fastest tennis balls were used, Nadal would still beat Federer with no problem. Nadal in a Slam is not the same player as Nadal in a Masters 1000.

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  15. Thanks, Andy...I agree with you (not about the awesomeness of my post but about how we would see a totally different Nadal in an indoor HC major)...the Nadal that Federer destroyed 2 months ago is not the Nadal that beat him last night

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    1. The Nadal that Federer destroyed 2 months ago is the real Nadal - as well as Jokeovec that at the time avoided Federer like plague is the real Jokeovic. Hough.

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