Friday, February 10, 2012

ITF President On Operation Puerto (Updated)

This certaintly deserves a new post...

Francesco Ricci Bitti, president of the International Tennis Federation (10.02.2012): "I think that Spain should have a found the way to disclose all the Operation Puerto. Right now it wouldn't be this perception, this feeling...It was not a mistake, (but) this was not good for sport in Spain, the fact that they weren't able to disclose all the aspects of the Operation Puerto."

While I'm shocked that Bitti talked about this at all, it's pretty rich coming from the ITF given their own disclosure policies: here and here.

Update: An interview with Lionel Dutemple, a writer for Les Guignols. He talks about the doping sketches involving Spanish athletes that aired this week. Dutemple is of the opinion that because Spanish athletes are held in such high esteem in their home country, they lack the perspective to deal with the satire presented in the skits. Further, he makes clear that the show is a comedy through caricature, and not journalism. Last, he hints that there may be more ridicule to come next week.

12 comments:

  1. In the article - do you know what they mean by "the AMA rules are based on Swiss law" ? I hope the mainstream media picks up this article.

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    1. AMA is the French acronym for WADA. And the ultimate court of appeal for an anti-doping violation is Swiss Federal Court, so that's the Swiss law connection.

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  2. How surprising. A "surprise" drug test for Rafa today.


    MADRID: Rafael Nadal says he underwent a surprise doping test toward the end of a week in which the Spaniard was at the center of jokes made by a French TV program about his country's alleged ties to doping.

    Nadal wrote on his Twitter account on Saturday: "8:30 in the morning!!!Just finished passing a surprise antidoping test...it was expected after everything...but I'm happy it's like this!''

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/tennis/top-stories/Rafael-Nadal-undergoes-surprise-drug-test/articleshow/11850228.cms

    Well, there you go - that "proves" he can't be doping! Doesn't it?

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  3. There are two unsavoury scenarios to explain this:

    1) Nadal's "surprise drug test" is a publicity stunt orchestrated by the ITF, with or possibly without the prior knowledge of the Nadal camp.

    2) The "surprise drug test" never really happened but was invented by Team Nadal.

    Either way, the ITF will neither confirm nor deny the occurrence of specific testing missions, the protocols for testing selection, the types of testing performed, the results of testing or the deliberations that go on behind the scenes if (heaven forbid!) anyone ever has an adverse finding. This is the nature of the ITF Secret Anti Doping Program.

    I could claim that I am tested every day if I wanted to. Who's to say it isn't so?

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  4. It could be a Spanish anti-doping test, rather than an ITF one - probably easier to arrange that way.

    Then again, do Spain do those?

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    1. It's actually kind of funny, it's so dumb. Nadal says it was a "surprise drug test", yet says in the same breath "it was expected" (so it really wasn't a surprise) and what's more was "expected after everything" (in other words, the French tv satire) so it was really an intended riposte to the latest controversy; not routine, not usual - although not even a surprise - but more in the category of a stunt, though a stunt that ultimately proves nothing. Yet it is supposed to show how "rigorous" drug testing is in tennis, and to prove once again how clean Nadal is (and his fellow Spaniards, of course.) Personally, I don't accept that, for reasons well traversed here and elsewhere, but it does prove how seriously the Spanish take their satire, or that a Gallic sense of humour does not extend to the Iberian peninsula. As they say - the weapon of wit.

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    2. All national anti-doping bodies should have the capability to carry out tests. So, it could be Spain, the ITF, or the WADA could have ordered one. Not sure about the IOC.

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  5. a "surprise" test that he "expected"....and when in the history of drug testing has Nadal been "happy it's like this"....he's NEVER done anything except complain about drug testing...that's so transparent it's difficult to read the words on the page

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  6. and I love how he already knows he "passed" it....so soon after, in his mind, Contador was banned for being clean....shouldn't Nadal be very wary of the possibility that he has a "tainted supplement", totally unbeknownst to him.....or possibly some tainted beef, totally unbeknownst to him....isn't he afraid the same authorities that were out to smear and destroy the innocent Contador might be out to get him?....and if, in his mind, a failed drug test isn't proof of doping then doesn't it follow that a passed test isn't proof of being clean?

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    1. You are quite right: if a failed drug test isn't proof of anything then neither is a clean test. So "Marion Jones" (she never failed a test) to you, Mr Nadal!

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    2. maybe he meant to say he pissed it. LOL

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  7. Richard,

    If we aren't careful we're going to be accused of being the same person.....

    ...also keep in mind that right now, the month of Feb, Nadal is nursing his horribly debilitating shoulder injury that he bravely played with during the AO (it truly was difficult to witness the physical pain he clearly had everytime he hit a 100 mph forehand)....he clearly isn't playing DC right now, so I'm sure he also isn't "in training", which, if he actually was tested, would make it the dumbest out-of-competition test in the history of out-of-competition testing..

    ...look officer, here is the movie show ticket I've kept in my wallet for the last 3 years just in case I ever had to prove my whereabouts on the night of Feb 10, 2009, the night my wife was strangled...again, nothing to see here

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