Thursday, July 26, 2012

Victor Conte on Prevalence of Doping

Thanks, mrn10sdave:

Victor Conte: “I think the testing is more effective now...It’s certainly not foolproof. Do I think it’s relatively easy to circumvent the testing? I do. … If it was 80 percent (using drugs) before, I still think it is 60 percent now. I’m talking about the top tier — the top 20 in an event, not the top 50. But I still think it’s the majority of that top tier.”

He also offers an interesting piece of info on testosterone usage:
"Conte claims it is what he describes as an almost epidemic use of fast-acting testosterone from gels, patches or even time-release pellets surgically inserted in the buttocks. The low doses of testosterone are effective, can be flushed from the body by morning and fly under the radar of the standard testosterone screen."

8 comments:

  1. An interesting update from the London Olympics.

    "The New Zealander at the head of the World Anti-Doping Agency believes hundreds of athletes at the London Olympics could be drug cheats."

    "WADA director-general David Howman made the comments as details of positive tests were revealed on Wednesday."


    http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/london-games-2012/111681/'hundreds'-could-be-drug-cheats-at-games

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    1. Let's do some math. There will be 10,490 athletes at the London Games:

      If you believe the WADA is correct in saying that 1 in 10 athletes are doping then there should be around 1,490 dopers at the Games.

      If you believe Conte is correct in saying that 6 in 10 top 20 athletes are dopers, and assuming the Olympics is mostly top 20, then there should be around 6,294 dopers at the Games.

      The true number is probably somewhere in that range. Or higher. Or lower.

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    2. Not that it matters, but 10% of 10,490 is 1,049.

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  2. Completely unrelated to anything:

    Is it even possible for a draw to be less readable than the garbage that the Olympic website put up?

    http://www.london2012.com/tennis/event/men-singles/index.html

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  3. During the games, GlaxoSmithKline will analyze 5,000 samples or 400 a day. As there are 10,000 + athletes, it's clear that not everyone is going to be tested.

    "“The GSK lab gives us the very best possible chance of catching people who use doping,” said Hugh Robertson, Britain’s minister for sport and the Olympics.

    While improved testing during the Olympics is welcome, it won’t be nearly enough to stop the doping problem. “The question remains whether this helps to detect substances that are used way ahead of the Games,” said doping specialist Mario Thevis of the German Sport University in Cologne. “Such as substances that increase muscle mass [and] endurance performance in particular, because those are usually not administered in competition but out of competition. And the effect of these drugs is still there even weeks after cessation. Even though we might have the best possible lab on site [at the Olympics], we might not pick up everyone who is potentially cheating.”—Globe and Mail July 24.

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  4. Drug-filled butt pellets? I am kind of disappointed no one has said this is why Rafa has such a big ass and always pulls at his shorts, thus the case against him is proved. You guys are slacking. :(

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    1. Never thought of that. I'm sure he'll be ready with some new butt pellets for the Cincinatti tournament. I think he is carrying the butt pellet flag in the opening ceremony.

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