Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Anthony Bosch (Update #6)

Eufemiano Fuentes, Luis Garcia del Moral, and now...Anthony Bosch.?

A Miami Clinic has been identified as a source of supply for various doping products including human growth hormone (HGH) to testosterone to anabolic steroids. As reported by the Miami New Times, the client list includes:
San Francisco Giants outfielder Melky Cabrera, Oakland A's hurler Bartolo Colón, pro tennis player Wayne Odesnik, budding Cuban superstar boxer Yuriorkis Gamboa, and Texas Rangers slugger Nelson Cruz. There's even the New York Yankees' $275 million man himself, Alex Rodriguez, who has sworn he stopped juicing a decade ago... 
....Wayne Odesnik, who appears under the heading of "Tennis" in five handwritten lists of clients. He was billed $500 a month by the clinic.
...Odesnik reviewed his mentions in Bosch's files but didn't offer a comment before presstime.
Update #1

Question: Is the clinic bust the result of Odesnik's "substantial assistance"?

Also worth noting, Mike Fish and T.J. Quinn at ESPN report that "Major League Baseball is investigating multiple wellness clinics in South Florida, as well as individuals with potential ties to players, armed with the belief that the region stretching 50 miles south from Boca Raton to Miami is "ground zero" for performance-enhancing drugs still filtering into the game."

Lots of athletes train in the Miami area, including tennis players.

Update #2

Just like TenisVal tennis academy had ties to Dr. Luis Garcia del Moral, one must wonder if any Florida tennis academies have ties to "wellness clinics." I wonder if the ITF is collaborating with MLB on this case? Oh wait, who am I kidding...

Update #3

''The statement about Wayne's relationship with Mr. Bosch is completely false, and Wayne has contacted the reporter and newspaper for a retraction,'' the tennis player's mother, Janice Odesnik, wrote in an email to The Associated Press.
Update #4

"I don’t know Tony Bosch, have never had any dealings with him, never stepped in his office, and I have no idea why my name would be connected to his. Suggesting that I was a customer of this person is completely and utterly false. The part about my drug suspension is old news, and I’m not denying that. But the rest of it is just not true. When all that happened with me, I supplied the International Tennis Federation a list of all my doctors, and that guy was not on the list. I have never been his patient or client, and now my name is being smeared and spread all over the Internet in connection with this story."

Odesnik said he requested from the New Times a copy of the evidence it said had his name on it: “They sent me a piece of paper with my name handwritten on it and a bunch of other things marked out. That’s it. There was no payment listed, nothing, just the name ‘Wayne Odesnik’ written on a sheet of paper."
The interesting piece of information is that Odesnik refers to "things marked out" on the paper the New Times sent him, potentially indicating that there were other names under the "Tennis" heading on Bosch's client list.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/01/30/3207474_p2/report-alex-rodriguez-other-local.html#storylink=cpy

Update #5

I have never previously, nor currently, been a client of Mr. Bosch. The copy of the records that were provided do not show any amount paid to Mr. Bosch or to his clinic. These accusations are completely untrue. I have never paid any money, or any monthly fees, to Mr. Bosch. I have never bought any drugs from Mr. Bosch. I have never purchased HGH, nor any other illegal/banned substances from any person, including Mr. Bosch.
Odesnik isn't making any sense now. He's already admitting that he "ordered the HGH from the Internet" back in 2010. But, I guess the Internet isn't a "person," so maybe that's what Wayne means...

Update #6

The Miami New Times has posted notes (with dates) from Anthony Bosch mentioning Wayne Odesnik. The dates appear to cover 2009-11. This is significant because the 2010-11 period covers time after Odesnik's initial ban for HGH possession and after his ban was reduced for "substantial assistance." The plot thickens.
Thi
Read more here: httOdesniksp://www.miamiherald.com/2013/01/30/3207474_p2/report-alex-rodriguez-Oodelkjother-local.html#storylink=cpy

71 comments:

  1. There were 5 tennis players?

    Presumably the others were real nobodies if Odesnik was the big name they picked.

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    Replies
    1. No, there are 5 lists of clients, some of which contain a heading labeled "Tennis." On these lists, Odesnik's name appears, but it does not say how many other tennis players are listed.

      The lists were stolen by a disgruntled employee and illegally given to the Times. This is not the result of any government or anti-doping agency. See article: "They [the list of 'customers'] were given to New Times by an employee who worked at Biogenesis before it closed last month and its owner abruptly disappeared."

      The paper names Odesnik because there are pretty sure he won't sue him for reporting that he had possession of HGH -- a fact that is already publicly known.

      My prediction...This incident will be thoroughly investigated and the disgruntled employee arrested and convicted for HIPPA violations (disclosing medical information). None of the athletes will be sanctioned. If the ITF does get involved, it will be to protect the tennis players' "private medical information."

      Delete
  2. In a somewhat unrelated item, buyers of Lance Armstrong's book are suing him in a putative class action alleging that they feel cheated.

    http://www.travelerstoday.com/articles/4373/20130128/lance-armstrong-being-sued-class-action-lawsuit-admission-over.htm

    Not too sure about the legal merits of such a claim.

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  3. Guess who trains in Miami every year for privacy reasons :) None other than Andy Murray!

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  4. @Alec....wow, I had to do some googling to confim but damn...didnt know Murray trained in Miami.

    And apparently its the new "spain" of professional sports doping

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  5. http://www.latimes.com/news/world/worldnow/la-fg-wn-spanish-doctor-testifies-doping-20130129,0,6132592.story
    Fuentes confirms he treated tennis players, boxers and footballers, in addition to cyclists.

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  6. Serena and Venus Williams also live and train in Miami.

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  7. Meanwhile in Spain

    "Eufemiano a la jueza: 'Si usted quiere que le revele el nombre de mis pacientes, lo hago'. Silencio en la sala"

    Fuentes towards the judge: 'If you want me to say the names of my clients, I'll do it' Silence in the court.

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    Replies
    1. Won't hold my breath on that one.

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    2. ....and apt timing: Italian Olympic committee lawyer just asked the Fuentes judge to release the full client list, and was told it wasn't relevant to guilt.

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    3. CONI guy (Italian Olympics) not impressed: "Fuentes himself proposes to reveal the names (his client list) and the judge refuses to ask him. It's incredible!"

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    4. Fuentes' lawyer says explicitly he is willing to reveal the entire list ......

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    5. Whose payroll is the judge on?

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    6. Just a disgrace, incredible...
      The guy is tried for "violating public health regulations" and the victims names are to remain unknown ?
      Wow, what a justice !... Hope it changes soon. Otherwise, what an inspiration for Les Guignols de l'info :-)

      Delete
  8. You gonna find these so called "anti aging" clinics in almost every town in the USA. It is big business. Some of these clinics are very sophisticated and only the "stars" are allowed in.

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    1. Funny you mention this. I just got an email from my tennis club and an "anti-aging" rep is coming to the club to talk about their programs. No need to go to the clinic, the clinic is coming to a tennis court near you.

      At least now I know whenever I lose it will be because the other guy is doping.

      Delete
  9. Ha ha. Wayne Odesnik shot the sheriff, but he did not shoot the deputy.

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    1. His mother is handling this for him? Looks like Wayne got the estrogen mixed up with the HGH.

      Delete
    2. I remember Landis' Mom on TV - in front of her house with all kinds of Christian message boards on the lawn.
      She said some thing like " Ma boy, Floooooyd would nevah do a thing like that, he's God-fearing son of Jesus and would nevah cheat"

      I had a good chuckle at that.

      Delete
  10. On the subject of chuckles. I thought people might get a laugh out of this gem from Wertheim. What a bell-end.

    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/tennis/news/20130130/australian-open-mailbag/index.html

    Of all the athletes throwing stones at Lance Armstrong, I did not expect Andre Agassi to be in that crowd. Considering he, too, used drugs (albeit non-PEDs) and had ATP cover for him, he should have kept his "anger" to himself.
    -- Allan Cruz West Chester, Pa.

    • Totally disagree. Among all his other sins, Armstrong did a huge disservice to athletes. Bravo for Djokovic and Azarenka, among others, for calling him out. And while we can debate whether crystal meth is a PED, I think Agassi -- who acknowledged his own incident in the course of his answer -- is within his rights to have an opinion as well.

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    1. "Bravo for Djokovic" that is a joke, right?

      Delete
    2. But but but, there's no evidence. :/

      There's no evidence for your son wacking it to porn on his computer. Would you bet your life on him not doing it?

      Seriously, the following scenario should give these ostriches pause:

      Imagine a demon holds you captive. He gives you 2 options: either you sacrifice your right arm, or you bet your life on Djokovic/Nadal/Bolt being clean.

      How many people wouldn't rather pick losing their arm in this scenario?

      Delete
  11. High quality Roger Federer (fan) blog referencing this very site in a post about doping in tennis: http://www.perfect-tennis.co.uk/does-tennis-have-a-doping-problem/

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  12. How about Vijay Singh? Has this been mentioned here yet? Why was he using deer antler spray anyway? Wouldn't you make sure before using something as odd as deer antler spray?

    http://sports.nationalpost.com/2013/01/31/vijay-singh-withdraws-from-phoenix-open-after-admitting-he-used-deer-antler-spray/

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    1. It appears the Golf has a similar problem.. Doug Barron filed a lawsuit claiming inconsistent policies regarding granting TUE's for testosterone.

      http://www.golf.com/tour-and-news/doug-barron-files-lawsuit-against-pga-tour

      In the lawsuit, it came out that a number of golfers had tested positive for recreational drugs but that the results had been buried. http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/lawrence-donegan-golf-blog/2010/jan/19/golf-drugs-in-sport-dougbarron-lawrencedonegan-pgatour

      In any case, Barron settled his lawsuit when the PGA granted his TUE. He can now use testosterone and apparently the beta-blockers he also wanted to continue taking.

      http://www.pga.com/news/pga-tour/drug-suspension-lifted-doug-barron-heads-q-school-try-regain-status

      Given that tennis has a published large number of positive tests but few doping violations, it is likely that tennis is simply using TUE's to cover up doping -- it's not doping if it's legal.

      Previously, a commentator on this blog had said that TUE's for testosterone would be very rare. While we can never know about tennis, it is clear that they are granted in other sports such as boxing and golf. There is no explanation why tennis would be different.

      Delete
    2. Golf? Seriously? An activity that requires as much fitness as walking through a park? Calling it a sport is already a stretch.

      Anyway, recreational drugs scream marihuana.

      Delete
  13. http://www.tennisnow.com/News/Featured-News/Rafa%E2%80%99s-Return-The-Boy-Who-Cried-Vina-del-Mar.aspx

    "Reports from Nadal’s “people” have been frequent - and inconsistent - since that last loss in June, which has done nothing to quell ever-present doping rumors. The fact that steroid use is a well-documented predisposing factor for tears in the patella tendon is not doing him any favors either."

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    Replies
    1. Reading those comments is painful. You just want to put cigarettes out on these fools.

      Delete
  14. Coming up on Australian ABC's Four Corners program:

    Monday 4 February 2013

    He's a drug cheat, a bully and a liar who abused his best friends to keep a terrible secret, but has Lance Armstrong finally told the truth? The answer - almost certainly - is no.

    Quentin McDermott lifts the lid on the stories Armstrong didn't tell in his recent interview with Oprah Winfrey, including his efforts to discredit a three-time Tour de France winner. It also examines allegations of his involvement in bribing and race fixing, as well as drug taking. Travelling across the United States, Four Corners talks to the people who know Armstrong well, dissecting the cyclist's so called "confession" and seeking answers to the questions that remain.

    Why did Lance Armstrong challenge much of the evidence gathered by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA)? Why did he choose to defend a doping mastermind? Why has he stood by cycling's world governing body, the UCI? And how will cycling recover from the devastation caused by Lance Armstrong?

    Investigative Journalism at its best.

    http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/stories/2013/01/31/3680186.htm

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  15. More details on A-Roid:

    MIAMI -- The texts, the source said, usually came late at night, telling Anthony Bosch to come to the house. Bosch would then head to the waterfront mansion on Biscayne Bay, through the gate on North Bay Road, to inject performance-enhancing drugs into Alex Rodriguez.

    Procedures were different, though, sources told "Outside the Lines," for the other athletes who were customers of Bosch's Biogenesis of America clinic in Coral Gables, which Major League Baseball considers the center of a widespread doping operation in South Florida. Those athletes, sources said, relied on intermediaries to transport the performance-enhancing drug regimens Bosch provided.

    But for A-Rod, the service was always personal: "Only Tony handled A-Rod," one source told "Outside the Lines."

    The visits were every few weeks. One night last spring, a source said, Bosch told associates he had been kicked out of Rodriguez' home after he had trouble locating a vein and infuriated the player. The sources did not say why Bosch would have been tapping a vein, as HGH and testosterone do not require intravenous injections. But whatever he was doing, "Tony said A-Rod was pissed at him," a source said. "He said he was bleeding everywhere."

    Several sources, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said Bosch spoke openly about his relationship with the Yankee All-Star, and two sources said that documents they reviewed detailed the drug regimens and schedules Rodriguez received.

    A spokesperson for Rodriguez on Friday said, "the allegations are not true."

    http://espn.go.com/espn/otl/story/_/id/8904501/operator-miami-clinic-linked-peds-mlb-treated-yankees-alex-rodriguez-directly

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  16. Did anyone post this article about Nadal's return?

    http://www.iol.co.za/sport/tennis/new-racket-bigger-business-for-nadal-1.1461213#.UQxjeh0TJqU

    Not sure how trustworthy it is but it says he's got a new racquet and has been tested 6 or 7 times by the ITF since he has announced his return.

    I wonder why the ITF would test him 4 times in 2 weeks unless there was something fishy going on?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 6 or 7 ooc? Hrrrrrrrrrrm indeed. Hard to see that as anything other than target testing.

      The article is attributed to dpa (Deutsche Presse-Agentur). Can't find an original, but you can see the exact same text has been sold to news organisations all over the world:

      http://tinyurl.com/as6hmny

      Delete
    2. Benito was talking about multiple tests within the span of a month a few weeks back. If true, this certainly seems like targeted testing when you consider the relative dearth of OOC tests as a whole.

      Delete
    3. Possibly as many oocs in a few months as he's had in his entire career beforehand.

      What's curious is why IttyBitty would publically release that info. Was it in response to a question about doping?

      Delete
  17. Poor Wayne Odesnik. Apparently he was being stalked by this Anthony Bosch character, who wrote his name obsessively on little pieces of paper and planted his suitcase with some HGH.

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    1. Yeah, but am I missing something, why would Odesnik deny the specifics of taking drugs if already caught? Is it because this link him to more recent drug taking after he was initially caught?

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    2. Well, assuming he is linked to Anthony Bosch, we have proof that he did not provide "substantial assistance," since he is still denying it. I suppose he could have had more than one source for his HGH and provided "substantial assistance," for the other source and didn't name Bosch, but I think it is more likely that he provided no substantial assistance and merely threatened to name other bigger fish if they didn't let him off.

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    3. THASP

      the Rusedski defense.

      No wonder whyMurray's panties were in a twist over Odesnik. Especially given this Miami connection.

      Delete
    4. Murray's "panties were in a twist" because nobody likes a snitch.

      I realize that most of you ae white and probably over 30.

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    5. A little whiff of your own prejudice?

      Delete
  18. World no. 10 Marion Bartoli is in Paris this wek for the Open GDF Suez and commented to the media there, "I feel like we have too many drugs tests in tennis. I get tested 35-40 times every year. From my point of view, it's impossible (for cheats) not to get caught these days."

    "Maybe Lance Armstrong was tested a lot and never failed a test but I just don't know how that is possible."

    http://www.tennisworldusa.org/WTA---Marion-Bartoli-feels-there-is-enough-drug-testing-in-tennis-articolo8186.html

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  19. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  20. The comment Fuentes made about being willing to name the clients, can anyone give me the source. I google that text string, I just get this blog or other blogs.

    PS I read Spanish.

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    1. In english, for example : http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/cycling/9836906/Spanish-doctor-Eufemiano-Fuentes-told-he-does-not-have-reveal-athletes-he-treated-in-doping-inquiry.html
      (in french : http://www.lemonde.fr/sport/article/2013/01/30/dopage-suivez-le-proces-fuentes-en-direct_1824343_3242.html#ens_id=1272002&xtor=RSS-3208)

      Delete
  21. Nadal apparently will no longer work with IMG. I am putting my conspiracy theory hat on but could it mean that he is no longer under "protection" and therefore was tested repeatedly?

    "Carlos Costa, a former top 10 tennis player who has been Nadal’s manager for years, left the agency IMG, the world’s biggest in the field, to create a family company with Sebastian Nadal, Rafael’s father, which means there are no longer any commissions to pay or anything to debate: they have control of everything."

    http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-in-school/new-racket-bigger-business-a-different-nadals-comeback/article4362968.ece

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    Replies
    1. That or they realize Nadal's career is winding down and dont want to give away any more money than they have to.

      Delete
  22. Nadal weighing in on the doping issue...

    http://www.tennis.com/pro-game/2013/02/nadal-tempers-expectations-comeback-chile/46270/#.UQ2e6U8U5z9

    "Above all, the sport must be clean. We must have certainty that the rival in front is as clean as I am," he said. "I don't have any problem with having controls every week to combat what has happened in other sports. Tennis continues to be a clean sport as it has been throughout its history."

    LOL. This guy's too much. Didn't Lance say similar things? And how many doping tests did he pass?

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    1. '"We must have certainty that the rival in front is as clean as I am," he said.' For crying out loud.

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    2. I'd say that many of his rivals are precisely as clean as he is...

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    3. Yeah Nadal offering any opinion on doping is just LOLworthy.

      this from the guy who bitched and moaned the loudest about frequency of testing.

      Notice how Murray and Nadal are now the biggest supporters of testing ever now?

      Delete
    4. I would go beyond many and say all of his chief rivals. I've always felt these sports were either clean or dirty by all top players. Those who say somehow one or two don't and everyone else does simply are biased and miss the point .

      Delete
  23. http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/8904906/daring-ask-ped-question

    Doesn't mention tennis specifically but a lot of the smae observations apply.

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    Replies
    1. That's a really good article. I notice basketball also claims that "PEDs wouldn't help basketballers". Starting to sound familiar? Baseball, tennis, basketball, soccer, have all said it. It seems every darn sport claims this. Deliberate head-in-the-sand stuff. No, not even head-in-the-sand. It is in fact *deliberate PR nonsense designed to fool the public*.

      Delete
    2. Fabulous article; thanks for posting.

      Delete
  24. Chilean´s newspaper "La Tercera" published this today about Nadal's visit to that country:
    Dentro de su agenda en Chile, el ex número uno del mundo tenía programada una conferencia de prensa que realizó ayer. Y uno de los temas que trató fue el dopaje, luego del escándalo del ciclista Lance Armstrong. Nadal reconoció que “en este tiempo me han hecho seis exámenes de orina y sangre. Quiero tener la certeza de que el rival que tengo en frente está igual de limpio que yo. O sea, que si tiene que pasar un control cada semana, no veo ningún problema, con tal de combatir lo que ha pasado en otros deportes”.

    It means something like this:
    Within his agenda in Chile, former world number one was scheduled to offer a press conference yesterday. And one of the topics discussed was the doping scandal after cyclist Lance Armstrong case. Nadal acknowledged that "at this time, I have made six urine and blood tests. I want to be sure that the opponent I will have in front of is as clean as me. That is, if you have to pass a check every week, I see no problem, as long as it fights what has happened in other sports. "
    Interesting, no? Is there a way to get to the data that proves those 6 exams were actually taken? Wonder how many of them were blood tests and when were they taken?
    http://diario.latercera.com/2013/02/03/01/contenido/deportes/4-129127-9-las-desconocidas-conexiones-de-rafael-nadal-con-chile.shtml

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    1. I believe he's referring to the six tests between December and end of January. As usual this can be misconstrued and twisted to fit the argument.

      Delete
  25. Wonder what folks on this blog think of Nadal's comments to Latin American media saying all doping test results should be made public. He was questioned regarding Armstrong and said in effect in order to keep the sport clean they should reveal all test results for transparency sake. I know folks here will spin the comments but I think Rafa is correct.

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    1. I think it's an intriguing contradiction to the Nadal that claimed that it was "unfair" to get a warning if he (or Moya also, in the specific case) fails to make himself available for an unannounced test. So we're supposed to believe he wants transparency in doping controls but just doesn't want doping controls to be random or unannounced?

      Armstrong admittedly doped for years and by any accounts, at most, he failed two drug tests out of probably 150-200. His 500+ claim has been debunked several times (if believed, it means he was tested on average once a week for ten years).

      It's more media spin from Mr. Topspin. A good journalist would ask him the following:

      - Is he in favor of making his blood profile public?

      - Is he in favor of doing away with "drug testing" and simply enacting a program of 12-24 blood tests a year that simply monitor blood profiles as opposed to testing for illegal drugs?

      - Why does he now all of the sudden want, paraphrasing, "enough drug tests to ensure that the person above him is as clean as he is" when just a year or so ago he openly claimed that he knew tennis was a clean sport (despite simultaneously claiming he knew nothing about doping?" To the public's knowledge not a single significant player has tested positive since he made that claim. What changed his opinion?

      - If he's so in favor of transparency does he advocate the release of Dr. Fuentes' client list?

      - Most of all he should be asked that if we're to believe his knee was too injured for competition and that it's still sore and bothersome exactly how was he able to get into shape to play? If we see anything remotely resembling the Nadal we always see on clay then one really has to wonder how he was able to attain that conditioning despite his having an injury so severe he was unable to play. On the other hand, if he isn't fit enough to get into his normal condition then why is he playing?

      I have no idea if he got caught recently. But if he did get caught I'd bet my life it wasn't via an in-competition, loser-targeted tournament drug control.

      Delete
    2. A 6 OCC world record just during the loooong time he doesn't play official tournaments. Why not ?... Hmmm.

      "- If he's so in favor of transparency does he advocate the release of Dr. Fuentes' client list?" (swisscheese40)
      Couldn't have said better.
      Well, I guess Julia Patricia Santamaría (Fuentes trial judge) will now follow Rafa's fantastic transparency example ^^

      Delete
  26. The Lance Armstrong affair is not over.

    http://www.abc.net.au/iview/#/series/four%20corners

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  27. Eufemiano Fuentes on football, in Spanish:

    http://futbol.as.com/futbol/2013/02/04/primera/1359981653_150203.html

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    1. Potential H-bomb... you can understand why the spanish authorities seem to be so interested in NOT knowing Fuentes' customers...

      And of course, the former president of the Real Sociedad (now president of the spanish federation) refutes Badiola's allegations : http://soccernet.espn.go.com/news/story/_/id/1326605/ex-real-sociedad-chief-in-doping-claim?cc=5739

      What about tennis ?

      Delete
    2. The chance is great for something to implode in Spain these days. The last Spanish government´s corruption scandal might have come as helpful. More and more people, fed up with it all, are starting to demand truth and catharsis. Surprisingly, the media coverage of Puerto hearings is being quite decent, so far. And the comments section is full of skepticism and anger from the people.
      A few blows like Badiola´s and Pandora´s box will be finally open, in spite of judge Santamaría´s efforts, the amnesiac Guardia Civil lieutenant or whatever.

      Delete
  28. Murray says he wants tighter controls in tennis : http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/tennis/21330805

    About Fuentes' trial : "I think it's essential that the names and whoever was involved with it, it's essential for tennis that that comes out"
    Finally words that make sense.

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  29. Nadal just finished his doubles match. And wow, he is getting the celebrity treatment from the country and his visit was deemed as "illustrious" Has this been done for other players before?

    Did those guns seems a bit big or what?

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  30. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/drugsinsport/9851231/Dick-Pound-former-head-of-World-Anti-Doping-Agency-claims-he-is-certain-that-tennis-has-a-doping-problem.html

    Dick Pound, the former head of the World Anti-Doping Agency, has added to the climate of suspicion surrounding tennis by claiming he is “sure” the sport has a drug problem.

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  31. What I wonder is why when he was head of WADA he did nothing about it. Or is he implying that doping didn't really get bad until after he left?

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  32. Non-disclosure contract terminated, now he can go all out (literally).

    Speaking of Lance Armstrong, Abraham Olano who finished 4th in the Sydney 2000 Time Trial Road Race notably has not been upgraded to Bronze after Armstrong's DQ.

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