Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Another Leak? Nuria Llagostera

This story has now hit the English-language media:
"The ITF has not released any statements about [Nuria] Llagostera, who media reports alleged tested positive for methamphetamine at the tournament in Stanford, California...
"'The ITF has no comment to make about Nuria Llagostera Vives. The only time that the ITF will make a comment on a doping case in the name of the Antidoping Program is when a player has been found guilty of committing a doping violation at the end of an investigation,' the Spanish Tennis Federation said...
"EFE contacted Llagostera for comment and she declined to discuss the matter, saying only her attorney was authorized to speak."
For those keeping track, this is potentially the third leaked positive test result of a professional tennis player this year, following the leaked results of Barbora Záhlavová-Strýcová and Marin Cilic.

96 comments:

  1. Bodo on "Doping Gossip"...

    He is starting his generally weak piece off with some unimportant gossip item... obvs to take the heat out of an otherwise relevant discussion. Setting the tone for discrediting doubters as mere gossipers...

    While conveniently omitting all the obvious facts, like the ITFs tolerance of players lying when they are waiting for the tribunal. Their false secrecy protecting players which fosters the very speculation Bodo bemoans rather than handling postive samples transparently.

    Additionally, he is not touching the blatant contradictions in both Troicki's and Cilic's lame-ass excuses...

    So all in all a typical Bodo piece defending the party line - even suggesting that the latest ITF efforts regarding more testing is finally paying off...

    http://www.tennis.com/pro-game/2013/09/they-said-what-doping-gossip/49194/

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    1. Original Source Bodo based his article on:
      http://pagesix.com/2013/09/15/new-hbo-series-to-feature-losers-looking-for-love-in-la/ (An entertainment blogger!)

      "Eyes on tennis players
      ATTENTION. Specialists surrounding athletes whisper sports’ next druggy PED swamp would/could/should envelop tennis. Maybe being the highest genteel-est of the rough-and-tumble games, sort of a gentleman’s or gentlewoman’s pursuit, those players are least checked. However, their primary urine testing isn’t failproof since substance can disappear in a short period. Medical professionals are citing definitive body changes in certain players. Just telling you what I’m told."

      --

      See now, if it were me I would be worried about this information. After all I care about the sport being clean. But Bodo on the other hand he dismisses it as gossip and then whines that he wants proof. Perhaps he should go out and find the proof himself rather than waiting for it to come to him. What a Bozo.

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    2. Bodo is actually the epitome of the most deplorable sort in the business: an arrogant, callous, cynical opportunist who misuses his verbal skills for a comfortable living by helping to ruin the environment he feeds off. There are many of the kind, as we well know, but none come even close to Bodo. He's the best.

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    3. Well, to answer Bodo about where these "allegations" are coming from. Try, Dr. Fuentes. He claims to have several blood bags from tennis players that are conclusive proof of doping. Try Tony Bosch. His client list allegedly contain a list of tennis players who were involved in "anti-aging" activities like taking HGH. (Note, Odesnik denies that he has any association with Bosch and denies every buying HGH from anyone -- although he admits that is some how got into his luggage he was carrying with him to Australia.

      So, yes, there is ample evidence that there is doping in tennis that is, at the very least, not being investigated by the ITF, and at the very worst being actively covered up by the ITF. Note that baseball has banned players for information contained in the Bosch files. The ITF has not even read the files, nor requested copies of them.

      So, yes, when a doctor being tried for doping says, "Hey, I have a list of tennis players who are doping, anyone want them?" And the ITF says "No." Well, then rumors get started. Then, when the exact same thing happens in Florida -- except Bosch was only pretending to be a doctor, then people really start to talk.

      Rather than blaming people for "speculations," why don't you call up Stuart Miller and ask him why he doesn't ask for the Bosch files or attempt to get the names from Fuentes? Then we don't have to speculate -- we will know exactly who is doping. As it is, the FACTS are that we know that both Fuentes and Bosch have the names of tennis players that they were dealing with. There is a 99.9% probability that these dealings involved doping. So, stop the "tennis is clean" crap and work on getting the names.

      Also, to address the inane comment, "But it’s become pretty clear that one thing tennis has not done yet is satisfy the skeptics when it comes to the integrity of the current testing regimen." Sure, the "testing regimen" is a joke. But, that is not what is driving the rumors. The lists of known dopers that are not being disclosed is what is driving the rumors.

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    4. All this is really doing is showing up the inadequacies of an international sports federation as an anti-doping force. Clearly, the ITF is not in a position to conduct the type of investigatory work involved in digging out information on Biogenesis or Fuentes. It has no authority in foreign jurisdictions and it is not going to get the level of cooperation required acting alone. The question is, have they made efforts to engage with outside partners like USADA. Every time Odesnik continues to play an ATP tournament indicates that the ITF has done diddlysquat about extracting evidence from Biogenesis. By rights, Odesnik should be on a ten year ban by now, having effectively been caught out twice, presumably doping with hGh. Yet he's still able to cook a snook at the ITF and carry on plying his trade. It would appear his union, the ATP, is continuing to back him which say much for the two-faced nature of the ATP too. They are clearly happy to tolerate the continued presence of dopers in their ranks.

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    6. @ Peter

      "diddly-squat" sums it up nicely. ITF is by their own choice a toothless tiger, not getting stuff done other than listening to fairytale excuses.

      Bodo prefers to not look in that directions, for he has even less integrity than the ITF, but instead attacks those folks, who simply refuse to accept the ITF's Potemkin village. Boggles my mind, how one can deny/refuse reality so consistently. (Well, money clearly helps). I mean, it's not like Armstrong did not happen, or Fuentes, Bosch, Del Moral...


      What a swell job that must be, working for the ITF, mostly exonerating players on the basis of the most bloody asinine fabricated lies and occasionally catching a wheel-chair tennis player as a proof for their "successful" programm.

      What most don't understand is that the ITF certainly collected more positive samples in the past and only thanks to their extremely intransparent and lenient interpretation of what counts as a positive sample, many names (respectively more bs excuses) never found their way to our ears.

      So the leaked cases did put some pressure on the ITF, imagine no one knew about Cilic or Llagorstera or Troicki - I bet they would have accepted fairytale excuses...and they would have returned to the tour already.

      So I wonder WHAT powers provoked the leaks, respectively, are there some forces in tennis, that are not willing to cover up the dirt?

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    7. Bodo simply doesn't give a s**t anymore. I hate to use blunt language, but he just doesn't. He used to, but the last couple of years he's done everything possible to squelch any doping concerns about the sport. He has zero interest in any of the facts being presented to him and just dismisses them without any research whatsoever.

      I don't know what transformation he went under because he cared an awful lot about doping in that now-infamous 2006 column - the one during the Australian Open where he wondered aloud why Nadal wasn't playing and implied that Nadal dropped out to avoid having to take a drug test. He got a lot of heat for that column and I'm wondering if that's what caused his "I don't care anymore" attitude towards doping in tennis.

      It's a HUGE 180 he's taken in the last few years and it has made him a poorer writer because of it. He really just needs to retire.

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  2. "So the leaked cases did put some pressure on the ITF, imagine no one knew about Cilic or Llagorstera or Troicki - I bet they would have accepted fairytale excuses...and they would have returned to the tour already."
    ______________________

    Extremely true. With Stuart Miller on most players' mobile contact lists, I would BET that Troicki and Cilic for that matter would never have been banned had Miller had his way. He is a joke of an "anti doping" controller. "Anti scandal" campaigner should be his official title.

    He has never had a clue about the benefits of doping in tennis, never had a clue about the idea that doping exists in tennis, and has NO clue about how to test properly and investigate properly. He is given a free pass by 99% of the media and only talks in vague, meaningless comments about how he cannot comment. Which the media let him off with completely.

    MILLER HAS TO *GO* FOR TENNIS TO HAVE ANY CHANCE OF REDEEMING ITSELF IN THE EYES OF AN INCREASINGLY CYNICAL PUBLIC.

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    1. I am not entirely sure, but the ITF has always struck me as a toothless organization - a body that relies on bodies with greater power and finance to run its operations and this includes tournaments etc. I say this because I played in the juniors some years ago, and the ITF would struggle to run tournaments in certain countries without sponsorship being organized by the national tennis association. It was also pretty well known to most of us that certain individuals could buy their way into what they considered prestigious regional positions in the ITF by contributing significant funds etc. It is probably something not a lot of you may be able to relate with given that the countries you come from are a lot different from mine.

      Its a problem that probably has come about hand in hand with tennis going professional - in an amateur era where the stakes were a lot lower, the incentive to dope would have been a lot less and the stakeholders pushing stardom on specific players would not have existed.

      To me, the bigger problem lies with the ATP and sponsors - they are the ones with the most to lose in my opinion in the advent of a major doping scandal. It is possible that Miller's strings are being pulled here.

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  3. The idea that Troicki wouldn't give a blood test because he's "scared of needles" and that Cilic tested positive because "my mummy gave me some glucose" has to rank in the middle of the ridiculous excuses list athletes come up with. People might have given them more than a second's consideration back in the 80's, but not any more. We've heard it all before guys!

    When I read T_k's post about "EPO was in some vitamin syringes I plucked from my mother in law's fridge and then shot up with them because like that's just what you gotta do!" excuse by a German athlete, I thought that this really takes the cake. Troicki's and Cilic's excuses are pretty lame in comparison. Almost childlike. "My mum gave it to me" and "I am scared of needles", how original...

    No, how uttlerly LAME. And to think Bodo and the like do not even call out these lame excuses. Pretty pathetic.

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    2. Puerta's "I drank from my wife's glass and ingested some of her hypertension medication" excuse is right up there too in the list of absurd excuses. Thankfully the ITF didn't buy that excuse and sentenced him appropriately (of course it was his second offense).

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    3. Seeya, I wonder what convinced this time around that this Puerta excuse was in fact bullshit? Considering the general level of bs excuses they deem plausible/acceptable

      Makes you wonder...

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  4. I have a contact at the ITF who is involved with anti-doping and testing. He gave me some very interesting information about Federer.

    Federer tested positive for EPO last year. They informed him before the final of the World Tour final event in London and he was ordered to lose the match in 2 sets, which is what he did even though he was up 5-4 40-15 on serve in the second set.

    Federer was told to stop doping for a year as silent penance for doping his way to the 2012 Wimbledon title and world number one ranking. The effect of the juice didn't leave his system completely until after the Australian Open this year. But my contact suspects Federer used overnight blood transfusions at tournaments such as Rome, Halle and Cincy. However, he could not do it at the slams as the ATP forbade him to reach a Grand slam final this year and threatened to expose him if he did.

    What hope does tennis have if stars like Federer are considered to be 'too big to fall'? My contact says Federer will be allowed to resume EPO doping next year but has been warned to avoid a repeat of a positive test. I was amazed that the ITF could be so corrupt.

    We need to start a social media movement and let the ITF know that we will not permit this to continue. Tennis has to improve its testing policy and test the top players every week, in the off season as well. They can reduce the prize money during events to fund it. We cannot allow dopers like Federer to ruin our sport.

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    1. you are so full of crap Adam BG or Boreman or whatever your name is. Get a life.

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    4. Could your "contact", if he exists please get in touch with the owner of this blog?

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    5. Your story is like Nadal's comeback after his injury layoff: to good to be true.

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    6. Yeah, he worked really hard on his story, giving 110% and typed trough the pain in his fingertips...

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    7. Well in the past it was a "pro" providing all sorts of false information (that didn't work out too well), but now he has upgraded to a contact within the ITF itself. More credibility, no?

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    8. Geee, this is even more creative than what we have heard from players when it comes to invent excuses.

      Maybe this poster could apply at the ITFs very own fabrication office?

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    9. Well, as we have said before, Federer like any other player could be (or have been) doping, so I don't want to dismiss your story as fabricated, but just typing up a story and saying you have a 'source', without giving any kind of proof and saying he/she will divulge all in 20 years, doesn't give you much credibility....

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    10. Realistically, there are only a couple of people involved with anti-doping at the ITF. So, any "anonymous" contact could only be maybe one of three or four people.

      In any case, there are "Anti-doping assistants" that no longer work for the ITF. Holly Flatley are an Anti-Doping Assistant from January 2010 to March 2011 and now no longer works at the ITF. (http://uk.linkedin.com/pub/holly-flatley/49/10a/158). Charlotte Elton was also an Anti-doping assistant from September 2007 to January 2010. (http://be.linkedin.com/pub/charlotte-elton/15/466/97). Given the non-overlapping dates, it appears that this is exactly one position.

      So, if this source wants to cash in on a book deal, he better do it before Holly, or anyone else that no longer works there does.

      Finally, whether the allegations are true or not, what is far more interesting is how this was done. WADA compliant tests are not really susceptible to interference by the ITF in covering up results. We know "Dr." Miller runs his own non-compliant side testing, but any such testing would be voluntary. That is, you can refuse to let "Dr." Miller examine you. You can't refuse a WADA complaint anti-doping officer (unless you have "Dr." Miller's phone numbers). So, why would Federer, or anyone else, voluntarily submit a sample when he knew he was running hot?

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  5. Not sure why my post came up three times as I only hit Publish once.

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  6. An article accusing Nadal of doping (I think this article has been noted here before). I can't tell if it is tongue in cheek, or not.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-09/let-s-hope-drugs-prolong-rafael-nadal-s-great-career-.html


    A comment on the previous article. Note the Nadal fans vitriol. The circumstantial evidence continues to grow, yet the willingly blind fools keep grasping at straws (innocent until proven guilty, jealous Fed fans, he is too humble to do drugs,...).

    http://deadspin.com/lets-hope-drugs-prolong-rafael-nadals-great-career-1279047223

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    1. :) You are late to the party - we had that one in a previous post.

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    2. I did mention that the first article may have been mentioned before, but the second article comments on the first.

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    3. Golden Age of Drugs, do you mean this article: http://www.latinospost.com/articles/27666/20130915/tennis-news-rafael-nadal-s-reputation-rocked-latest-doping-accusation.htm

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  7. Here are the stats on Nadal's Hardcourt results divided by time of year since 2006:

    January-March:
    Match record: 128-29 (81.5%)
    Won 5 of 34 (15%) tournaments played

    Summer HC season:
    Match record: 93-16 (85.3%)
    Won 6 out of 22 (27%) tournaments played

    Fall HC season:
    Match record: 46-23 (66.7%) 1 title
    Won 1 out of 19 (5%) tournaments played

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    1. Okay, but could you elaborate on the point you're trying to make? We already knew that Nadal tends to perform poorer on HC the later it gets in the season. Not sure why you've broken down his results from 2006 onward...

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    2. So this confirms our thoughts pretty much.

      Though to be fair, I would assume that considering the tour's schedule any player - whether doped or not - had reasons to decline in performance during the fall season. But this would assume having gone deep in most events they partook in. Which is more the case with top players. Which is why doping would help etc.

      Yet, I also know that some players are good at looking at the season and picking their battles resonably, and give their most when the draw looks right even during the third half of the season. That said, one's form does not normally peak in the summer like a precious flower, as in Nadal's case, only to decrease dramatically in the fall.

      Let's assume top players would NOT dope to control their peak performances thanks to tighter doping controls, as a result we would see much more upsets and inconsistencies in players performances. Which would affect their marketability and TV money for the Slams and ATP/WTA. The data for the US Open just nicely confirmed this - both Djokovic and Murray don't draw the amount of money Federer and Nadal draw, or Serena.

      There is a very strong incentive to have your cash cows go deep. Subsequently, this will lessen any serious effort in catching top cheats. Furthermore, it will create a federation as we see it currently in the ITF: as mere populated scenery, with actors playing their parts more or less well and rehearsing their politically correct lines to an unaware public of fanboys and -girls and the media, with Ricci-Bitti and Dr. Miller, casted as leading actors in this ongoing mockery of an anti-doping programm. A soap opera, really, is what it is. And I believe their plot line has exhausted itself and they need a season finale quickly.

      I still remember a match by Nadal against Jürgen Melzer at Shanghai (a 1000 event, not some shabby small tournie) in 2010, which Nadal lost, because his game did look like nothing of what we are used to from Nadal: he looked spent and his footwork was crap and Melzer otoh did what he does best, catching Nadal on the wrong foot with some drop shots and for once he was not having his usual melz-downs. So he really had Nadal on the strings there without playing somethign out of the ordinary, just Melzer's usual fare. A really sweet win and I thought, well, more people would have a chance ag. Nadal if he would play "normal", that is without the advantage of his superior fitness/grinding style which might be owed to PEDs.

      Obviously, there would be a less stable/predicatble set of top players resulting from less certainty regarding the outcome of a match. The idea of the upset is something that has gone missing in that "Golden Age" of tennis we are apparently seeing these days.

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    3. I singled out this time period because Nadal won two events in the fall on 2005, got injured and never had similar success in the fall after that. Ever since 2006, he has rarely had a decent fall, with 2010 being his best.

      Interestingly, Federer is 4-0 against Nadal in fall tournaments (all 4 meetings were at the WTF). Nadal has taken just one set against Federer at the event. None of the previous GOAT contenders did as poorly in the fall season as Nadal does. In fact, Federer and Sampras DOMINATED during this time of the season, despite it being late in the year.

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  8. I cannot give you any details regarding my contact for obvious reasons; he likes his having a job too much.

    What I can tell you is he is keeping records of everything, so one day he will tell all as soon as he retires (although we unfortunately need to wait 20 years for this).

    I cannot wait for Federer the doping cheat to be exposed. "Stars" like Federer who win while doped to the gills with EPO ruin the game for me. I feel so sorry for someone like Roddick (who according to the gossip at the ITF was clean).

    By the way, I naturally asked my contact about the other stars (such as Nadal, Djokovic, Serena and Murray) and what their doping test results were like, but he couldn't give me much info on them as the ITF does not allow one employee access to details of more than one 'big name' player. The only players in the top 10 (both men and women) whose results my contact has access to are Berdych and Federer. Employees are very expressly prohibited from discussing the doping tests they have knowledge of with other staff, for obvious reasons.

    My contact has some very interesting info about Federer by the way, including his positive tests and skipped tests over the years, and some surprising private episodes of 'roid rage'. I don't have time to go into detail right now but I hope to do a post in the next week explaining these details. But in short, Federer looks to be as bad as any doper in the history of sport, and the test statistics that are actually released are the smallest pieces of the actual puzzle.

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    1. I won't comment on your conspirative content and will only say that much, and I think I can attest for most posters here:


      We are first and foremostly concerned in the integrity of the sport, which we see bedraggled by any, let me repeat, ANY cheat, whatever his'/her's name is.'

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    2. Yeah, again, that's a great story, but I could type a similar story about any player and explain exactly vwhere each result came from (e.g. conveniently building the story around Fed no reaching a GS final this year).
      And you say he would tell all in 20 years when he retires? Well, guess what, if he would publish all of this in the next year, EVERYBODY would buy the book about Fed doping and he would make truckloads of money, enough to offset his possible loss of his ITF job. 20 years from now, not that many people will care anymore....
      And btw, what was the status of Berdych according to your 'source'?

      Again, not saying your story is BS, but you're not giving us much to conclude it isn't BS either...

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    3. How would you know Roddick was clean? Your source did not have access to his records, and everybody at ITF was prohibited to discuss players' results with other staff, right?
      And if there was 'gossip', it's hard to believe there was gossip about a player being clean and no gossip about other top players testing positive...I mean, what do you think will be gossiped about more?

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    5. Robert this guy is just a troll... I admit the possibility of Federer being a doper just like any other player but the 2012 season just doesn't strike me as one in which he won because he was doped. Let's see:

      - Wins IW, but is totally degassed in Miami;
      - Beats del Potro in 5 sets at FO but loses in straights in the semi to Novak, looking completely unfit;
      - Beats del Potro at the olympics in a very long 3-setter and looks completely worn out in the final against Murray.
      - If he was on EPO I'd assume these sudden degassing events wouldn't happen
      - Also, if you watch the final of the WTF in 2012 (and if you didn't I recommend you do) you realize that it was a very high quality match with great attacking tennis from both players. Thinking that Federer had instructions by the ITF to loose that match and it had to be done in 2 sets is of course a joke...

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    6. We are first and foremostly concerned in the integrity of the sport, which we see bedraggled by any, let me repeat, ANY cheat, whatever his'/her's name is.'

      I completely agree with this statement

      However all I am getting from Adam BG's statement is just "Ho Ho Ho Feddy is a doper"

      Adam BG, could you please answer Robert's questions. What's Berdych status? and how does your source know that Roddick was clean?

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    7. Adam BG gave himself away with "Federer the doping cheat" which is a phrase Boreman used repeatedly.

      Nice try Boreman.

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    8. Adam, I bet your source is Tio Tony!

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    9. Let's all stop trying to be "fair" and just admit that this guy is full of s**t, as we all know. Personally I'm finding these two posts of his quite humorous! He has this secret source, concerned about keeping his job yet blabbing all to some guy who posts it all on the internet. Some light hearted relief in the post-slam part of the season. His "Federer during roid rage" posts will be quite humorous too, I can imagine them already, "Federer threatens little children if they don't do what he says, after he has injected himself", LOL!

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  9. "Yeah, again, that's a great story, but I could type a similar story about any player and explain exactly vwhere each result came from (e.g. conveniently building the story around Fed no reaching a GS final this year)."

    Yes, this is right. If I read this from someone on the internet, I would be skeptical as well. But it's not like I have anything that I can show you to prove its true. I received some information from someone, and I though this blog would be a good place to post it. It was the first time I ever had proof that I could believe that a prominent tennis player was a doper. Maybe twenty years when now, if and when the truth comes out, people might remember. But obviously I don't expect everyone to believe it.

    About Federer this year, surely there are a few other hints besides my story. He dropped off severely after a good Aussie Open. In an era where players over 30 are playing some of their best tennis, Federer looks a step slow and his play is jittery. Add this to complaints about his back which come and go, strange sweating at times, odd scheduling breaks (after playing so much in 2012) and you seem to have a player who might actually be struggling simply because he cannot dope as he did 12 months ago.

    "And you say he would tell all in 20 years when he retires? Well, guess what, if he would publish all of this in the next year, EVERYBODY would buy the book about Fed doping and he would make truckloads of money, enough to offset his possible loss of his ITF job. 20 years from now, not that many people will care anymore...."

    I hope you realize that an organization that fakes doping test results and hides tests won't exactly leave the evidence in a bright red folder in plain view. Do you think Agassi's meth test left a paper trail once they decided to hide it? What proof my contact has been able to gather will obviously be bitterly contested. And he will be sued for revealing confidential and classified information. He does think the evidence will stack up and prove the ITF guilty, at which point any case against him should collapse, but obviously this would involve a legal process.

    There is an element of risk. And while it may sound easy to you, a person with a family to feed and a mortgage to pay would prefer to wait until he doesn't have as many obligations and responsibilities, and has the time to go through with what is obviously a major step. Also, while he might get a monetary upside, its impossible to know how big it would be.

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    1. "In an era where players over 30 are playing some of their best tennis" But they aren't doping, of course... ::rolleyes:: Go away, troll...

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  10. "
    And btw, what was the status of Berdych according to your 'source'?"

    Berdych has no official positive tests. He does have a few missed tests over the years. But that is sadly fairly common. Obviously this doesn't mean he isn't doping, but there is no official proof.

    "How would you know Roddick was clean? Your source did not have access to his records, and everybody at ITF was prohibited to discuss players' results with other staff, right? "

    A couple of things here. Obviously, it would be much safer to gossip about negative tests, especially of a player who has retired. The ITF is especially strict on revealing positive tests of the biggest 'star' players. Naturally, some gossip does slip through about Nadal, Djokovic and Williams. In case you are interested, the general buzz/suspicion is that they are dopers. But no one has actually told my contact that any of them officially failed a test. What he heard about Roddick is also buzz as well. He might well have doped. Who knows?

    The only certainty here is the failed Federer test in 2012. He also failed one more test in 2009, and as I said earlier, I will talk about it in a later post along with various other details I got about the system in general.

    "Also, if you watch the final of the WTF in 2012 (and if you didn't I recommend you do) you realize that it was a very high quality match with great attacking tennis from both players. Thinking that Federer had instructions by the ITF to loose that match and it had to be done in 2 sets is of course a joke..."

    How many times have you seen Federer blow a lead in 2 consecutive sets on an indoor hard court?

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    1. So why did he even brake Novak's serve in both sets in the first place? Also, why didn't Federer just lose the 1st set when trailing 5-6 in the tie-brake but instead dug a brilliant passing shot while having his back towards the net?
      "my contact suspects Federer used overnight blood transfusions at tournaments such as Rome, Halle and Cincy". So I guess that after putting the twins to sleep Mirka injects a needle in Roger's balls to do the blood transfusion...
      "The effect of the juice didn't leave his system completely until after the Australian Open"... I guess that's why he couldn't handle back-to-back 5 setters, right Sherlock?

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    2. > How many times have you seen Federer blow a lead in 2 consecutive sets on an indoor hard court?

      It was Djokovic - world's best returner and the most dangerous player with his back to the wall. I don't see how there is anything more to it.

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  12. Who is Boreman?

    And why on earth do you people personally attack someone who is trying to engage in polite conversation?

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    1. I see what you are trying to do here.

      As we said before, ANY player regardless of their name could be doping. And yes feel free to assemble evidence concerning Federer or any other player for that matter and turn it into some narrative we could discuss. However don't invent stuff out of the blue, I mean srsly, we had Troicki telling is about his needle phobia and Cilic's mom/drug mule recently, which was bad, but don't try to top that level of bs, please, for trolling sake. Also, be prepared that we check for plausibility and evidence, whether direct or indirect, in anything you present here.

      Don't pretend to be upset if we dismiss it.

      If you would be serious about your whistleblowing, which in general would be welcome, you'd be smarter about how you go about it. How about you get in contact with Sen and leak stuff to him, which then, if found credible, would be posted here?

      Delete
    2. "Who is Boreman?", asks Boreman. High time you stopped overrating yourself and (consequently) underrating others. This pause in your "mission" was, for your standards, extremely long, but not long enough, as you see... How about taking a 30-years-break and then try "engage [us] in polite conversation" again, just in case we forget? Your obsession against our wakefulness... (Moreover, you'd have plenty of time to develop your creativity in the matter of assuming another "personae", so as not to be as pathetically easy to recognise as you've been until now.)

      Delete
    3. Now the powers that be are scared sh..less. Who is this whistleblower?! Wait a minute, says one of them. Of course, it's that one guy who knows ONLY about Berdych and Federer! All of our other guys know about two other players. But this one knows about Federer. We might need to eliminate him, together with his blogging friendo!
      Watch out, Boreman, they are Very dangerous and ruthless. I'd stay put for a few months or years if I were you...

      Delete
  13. Murray will reportedly have "minor back surgery." Murray is expected to miss the Asian swing, and presumably the rest of the season. Will he pull a "Nadal" and miss the Australian Open only to come out strong for Roland Garros, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open?

    Also, right on cue, Serena will miss Tokyo (one of many I assume) citing "fatigue." Sharapova as well (hasn't she not played? Don't know what she is tired about ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. None of the top players care about this part of the season, it's just a chance really for the >#5 ranked players to get some points and prizemoney while the top players find reasons to skip them.

      Murray will be back and strong for the AO.

      Delete
  14. Sen, I think this page needs updating :)

    http://tennishasasteroidproblem.blogspot.fr/p/doping-cases.html

    ReplyDelete
  15. Lisicki out to fever.

    Is anybody playing Tokyo this year?



    http://www.tennisnet.com/deutschland/welttennis/damen/Fieber-Auch-Lisicki-sagt-Teilnahme-in-Tokio-ab/5182297

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I am 10 days into my 14 day gluten free diet, so I figure I'll win Tokyo hands down. I am easily beating 3.0 women after just 10 days on the diet, so I figure 4 more days and I'll be ATP ready.

      These guys just need to stop taking gluten, then no more fevers, no more back pain, no more feeling tired, cures Sjogrens, and makes everyone world #1 until someone with bad knees beats them. But let's face it, Nadal just slipped Dopkovic some gluten, and that is how he won.

      Delete
    2. I am really worried about you now, 10 days in, how is the roid-rage coming along?

      Did your serve get faster? You'll play the WTA event, right?




      Most importantly: which wig will you wear?

      Delete
    3. Are they testing for EPO in Tokyo?

      Delete
    4. Wig? Nah, I'll just put a bunch of beads in my hair. I just have to remember not to rip my shirt off after every point I win -- might give the "secret" away.

      Funny thing about my serve, it only gets faster when my knees hurt.

      Delete
    5. Yeah, was thinking about that too, bum knees these days, that is in the days of the so called Golden Age of tennis as Bodo keeps on telling us, is just another stength, really, an asset, is what it is.

      Not a cumbersome hindrance or cause for early-career end like in the old days, mind you!

      Tennis elbow really is for losers. Bum knee is where it's at!

      Might want to get BOTH: back injury AND bum knees though, gotta stay on top!

      Delete
  16. "Judy Murray says her son Andy Murray will comeback stronger. The mother of Wimbledon champion says her son always comes back stronger. Judy Murray said in an interview,"

    http://www.tennisworldusa.org/Judy-Murray-says-her-son-Andy-Murray-will-comeback-stronger-articolo13044.html

    So now Murray's having back surgery and will probably be out the rest of the season but his mum is confident he'll come back stronger. Just like someone else came back stronger after injury? How sweet is that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sweet as. At least the big farce has competition. Murray tried gluten free and now he's seem for himself that an injury is more effective. Way to go Andy, so astute!

      Delete
  17. I realize she says in the article that Murray will come back stronger after his loss at the USO but one can't help think she's also referring to the back injury and upcoming surgery. How can this guy have a back issue serious enough to require surgery yet he's able to play three Davis Cup ties on his worst surface and win all three?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I remember the days when an injury actually hurt your career, not help it.

      Delete
    2. I remember the days when a long match actually hurt your chances in the next round...

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    4. So is Murray taking the Nadal route - time off and then come back even more aggressive?

      Come back what: the most ~aggressivest~?


      An injury these days is not a deficit, it is in fact an occasion to push your body even harder during off-time, add yet another superlativ, and yet squeeze even more testosterone out of your body, when, normally, you would think there is no way in hell a body is able to find that ~other~, new level of "more aggressive" or "stronger than before" without using "enhancements" once the bodies natural resources have been all used.

      Are there any limits? How much further can physical boundaries being pushed without resorting to PED's?

      Bodies like Djokovic's or Murray's to me already look like they achieved the maxximum that can possibly be achieved given the genetic material and their training. And possibly chemical help as well.

      Murray should get tested during "recovery" - this is the most tempting phase to cheat in order to preserve muscle mass.

      Delete
    5. Murray has mentioned having cortisone shots in the past, and those could certainly allow you to play through injury.

      Delete
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    ReplyDelete
  19. Off topic, but now that the Bio-Passport is finally up and running, I wonder if a similar list would be made for Tennis by the ITF.

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/ucis-suspicious-list-leaked-from-2010-tour-de-france

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pretty interesting:

      http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/lequipe-calculates-index-of-suspicion-for-teams-and-nations

      Delete
  20. Tampering with an NFL sample by a collector.

    http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/9707976/von-miller-denver-broncos-urine-collector-tried-cheat-test?src=mobile

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He should have been suspended the entire season without pay if this is true instead of the measly six games he got.

      This raises a lot of issues about doping control collectors in general for all sports.

      Delete
    2. Yup, it does.

      Add to that labs whose licence is being revoked for not meeting WADA standards...

      Not to mention the one's like in Lausanne, who told Armstrong how to beat the system...

      Delete
  21. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  22. In the aftermath of the Troicki affair, it's interesting to revisit 2003 comments from Marat Safin. At that time, he was objecting to EPO blood testing being introduced, stating "some people are afraid of needles, while others could object on cultural or religious grounds".

    I wonder if his sister had psychological, religious, or cultural objections to blood testing during her medical evaluations in Spain?

    I'm sure these comments have already been posted and extensively discussed, but for those who are new(er) to the blog, quoted here....

    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/tennis/2003/australian_open/news/2003/01/13/notebook_tuesday_ap/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    2. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought an athlete couldn't use religious reasons for refusing to take a blood test or any type of drug test.

      So what the hell was Safin yammering about? None of his opposing viewpoints are valid.

      Delete
    3. Safin could be incoherent a lot of times with some stuff he said, but he remains one the best examples of what happens to a person with knee injuries. For that and his talent, I'm willing to see this was a Marat brainfreeze moment.

      Delete
  23. Bodo at it again - spilling some ~insider~ stuff on Nadal (actually serving us some tearjerky leftover notes from some "intimate" and surprisingly (not really) "confessional" post-USO presser with THE LORD OF PAIN himself).

    "This, by the way, was the same meeting at which Nadal said of Djokovic, in a moment of absolute—and absolutely conscious—candor: “Sometimes, I really don’t know how I am able to beat him.” That confession was so sincere that everyone in the room, including Nadal, began laughing."

    Bodo not only let's us casually know that he spent some intimate quality downtime with TLOP himself, during which he leaves his brain outside the room, so he might not accidentally ask a critical question, but simply rejoice in pure adolation and sycophancy - wholly unfiltered by reason.

    Yet another chance to re-hash the tried Nadal (LORD OF PAIN) story of "more": "more aggressive" as per usual when talking about the turn-around moments ag. Djokovic, here citing the third set of the USO 2011 final as evidence:

    "I was able to fight more than in previous situations with him. (...) “Run for every point, fight for every ball, play aggressive.”

    Now Bodo:

    "And that, really, is one of the most significant lessons that can be taken from the saga of how Nadal has rebounded to re-establish his dominion over Djokovic. Nadal didn’t find some new, secret tactic or weapon. He didn’t embrace some magical training or fitness regimen. To turn around a rivalry against a player as gifted and dangerous as Djokovic, and to do it so comprehensively, mostly required an enormous amount of mental strength and combative joie d’vivre."

    And I may add: bum knees!

    Of course there is always that uncle Tony...


    "In our small-group meeting, Nadal put this persistence, this toughness, this fidelity to his mission down to the training provided by his uncle Toni Nadal during his formative years. “I always have that (mental toughness) because I work on that since I was a kid, every day. Is true my uncle made me play under a lot of pressure in every practice when I was a kid. I was able to play with the highest possible intensity, every practice. I am sure that what he did for me in those years enabled me to be how I am now.”


    http://www.tennis.com/pro-game/2013/09/rafa-explains-it-all/49248/


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The irony of this is that in no way was Nadal more aggressive winning the US Open against Djokovic. In the end it came down tot he fact that he was faster, more consistent, and stronger at retrieving. Djokovic was pulling the big shots and missing them too. And how no one has questioned how Nadal was able to do this after injury boggles my mind.

      Delete
    2. "combative joie d’vivre" So that's how they are calling it these days... Where is the rolling-eyes icon I've been looking for?

      Delete
  24. Nice to see the ITF keeping young tennis miscreants in check.

    http://www.sport.co.uk/tennis/italian-player-coppola-handed-sixmonth-matchfix-ban/4411861/

    It amazes me how people can bet on these obscure matches.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shocking how early they learn their trade.

      They should prolly test that brat for PEDs as well.




      Delete
    2. I don't know what it is about il Bel Paese when it comes to illegal match betting; Starace, Di Mauro, Bracciali and Galimberti have all copped a ban in recent times for betting. Galimberti must have been making a serious living out of it. He was found to have been at it for three years before getting popped. Volandri's another rumoured to have been ducking and diving during his journeyman's career.

      Delete
  25. Statement from Cilic which was posted on his official Facebook page yesterday:

    ---------------------
    To all my fans...

    Further to reports in the press, I can confirm that an urine sample I provided to the ITF earlier this year returned an "adverse analytical finding" for a Specified Substance. I can also confirm that the ITF convened a hearing on 13 September 2013, further to which the Tribunal decided to impose on me a nine-month ban, backdated to 1 May 2013. I will be appealing that decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport very shortly.

    I am not permitted to discuss the case in any detail but I can confirm that the substance in question originated from a glucose tablet purchased at a pharmacy in France. Unbeknownst to me, the glucose tablets contained a substance that is banned in-competition (although it is allowed out-of-competition). I would very much like to disclose more details about the case, but I hope that you will understand that in order to preserve the integrity of the legal process, I am unable to comment any further at this time.

    Finally, I wish to emphasise that I have never knowingly or deliberately taken any banned substances in my life and that I am opposed to any use of performance-enhancing substances in sport.

    I am frustrated that I cannot talk more about the case at this time, but I will do so as soon as the legal process is over, at which point I will answer any and all questions about the case.

    I thank you for your patience.

    https://www.facebook.com/MarinCilicOfficialPage/posts/701936186502838

    ---------------------

    Obviously written by his PR team. I wonder when he will file his appeal; I presume he will want to compete at the Australian Open?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "I am not permitted to discuss the case in any detail" Really? By whom? Your mother? Your attorney? Or is this just another lie like your injury?

      And why can't he comment? Is there some rule of arbitration that prevents it?

      No. Typically, your attorney will tell you not to comment so that you do not create contradictory or incomplete stories. However, at this point, Cilic has already testified, so all he needs to do is say the same thing he said in the tribunal. These things have court reporters who write down every word people say, so just get a copy of that and post it on your facebook page.

      "I am opposed to any use of performance enhancing substances in sport." Really? Then why would you take a performance enhancing substance out-of-competition? I mean, if it is banned in competition, it is a performance enhancing drug. So are your against performance enhancing drugs, or only when they are taken in-competition?

      "I wish to emphasise that I have never knowingly or deliberately taken any banned substances in my life" Ok, well other reports said you were taking nikethamide as a supplement, but I'll assume you are telling the truth. So, then why would you take any type of pill at all? Especially one bought in a pharmacy that you thought only contained sugar? I take sugar all the time, I don't need any pill to get sugar. Why exactly were you taking a pill that you claim you thought contained only sugar? Why not drink a gatorade? Eat a Snickers? They sell that stuff in France too.

      Delete
    2. I may add, why would you deliberately miss two tests then?

      The most self-evident answer to this: Because you were glowing, because you took PEDs out of competition and knew it.

      Any other answer belongs more in the realm of creative writing assignments gone wrong.

      Delete
    3. Has anyone throughout the history of doping in sport ever fessed up after being caught? First time I've heard someone blame it on his mother although I bet that excuse didn't get plastered over Facebook.

      Delete