Thursday, May 1, 2014

Decision in the cases of Paco Climent Gregori and Philipp Aleksanyan

Decision in the cases of Paco Climent Gregori and Philipp Aleksanyan

Press Release
30 April 2014 – London, ENGLAND - The International Tennis Federation announced today that Paco Climent Gregori and Philipp Aleksanyan have been found to have committed Anti-Doping Rule Violations under Article 2.1 of the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (presence of a Prohibited Substance in a Player’s Sample).

Mr Climent Gregori, a 16 year-old player from Spain, and Mr Aleksanyan, an 18 year-old player from Russia, provided urine samples on 8 September in association with their participation in the F30 Futures Event in Madrid, Spain. Those samples were sent to the WADA-accredited laboratory in Montreal, Canada for analysis, and were found to contain stanozolol, which is a Prohibited Substance under section S1 (Anabolic agents) of the 2013 WADA List of Prohibited Substances and Prohibited Methods, and is therefore also prohibited under the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (the “Programme”). Mr Climent Gregori and Mr Aleksanyan were each therefore charged with an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Programme.

Both players asserted that the stanozolol, for which they did not hold a valid TUE, had entered their system through their ingestion of pills provided to them by an unidentified pharmacist whom they befriended at the Granadia Tennis Club. This assertion did not meet the preconditions of Article 10.5 of the Programme (no fault or negligence, or no significant fault or negligence). The players’ attempt to rely on Article 10.5.4 of the Programme (voluntary admission) was also rejected.

Mr Climent Gregori’s and Mr Aleksanyan’s commissions of Anti-Doping Rule Violations under Article 2.1 of the Programme were confirmed, and it was determined that they are suspended from participation for a period of two years, commencing from 5 November 2013, the date on which they were provisionally suspended, and so ending at midnight on 4 November 2015. It was also determined that both players’ results at the F30 Futures event and all subsequent events in which they competed up to 4 November 2013 should be disqualified, with resulting forfeiture of the ranking points and prize money that they won at those events.

Read more at http://www.itftennis.com/news/176948.aspx#DYplkv0pbPpbv7ZX.99

59 comments:

  1. "hold a valid TUE"

    +++show me a player who holds a "valid" TUE and I'll show you a doper. They should have invented a career threatening foot injury, they might have gotten their TUE. I hear it worked wonders for someone... lol.

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  2. wow. a) why are we hearing about this now? and b) why do a couple of teenagers on the Futures circuit get two year sentences while grown men like Troicki and Cilic, who have been on the tour for years and should know better get slaps on the wrists? What a double standard.

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    1. well, if they did the same when nadal was 17.. things could be 50% cleaner by now

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    2. well attempting to nip it in the bud of the future generation doesn't excuse letting current top players continue to dope. If they really want to clean up the sport they need to treat infractions more severely (and actually TRY to catch the cheats instead of putting them up on pedestals).

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    3. a.) No idea why it takes so long for this information to come out - probably waiting for the case to go in front of the ITF for final sentence
      b.) Agree 100%. They put the hammer down on the no-names and the lower-ranked players yet let the stars/bigger names skate with relatively light punishments. I have little sympathy for the two teens, but they are teens and not pros- Troicki, Cilic and others have been on the tour for ages and know the rules.

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  3. So a 16 year-old and an 18 year-old on the Futures circuit dope. What's next? Club players? (Where can I get some of this stuff?) But I guess there's little chance the top pro's - 27 year-old's and even 33 year old's - are doping. (36, anyone?) Must be largely a problem of adolescence. Like bad driving.

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  4. Now we know that tennis event in Madrid and Spain has rigorous testings. Now we can watch and fully enjoy the show of the Madrid master. Here comes ball bashings and brutal grinds. Good luck

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  5. Impressive. They are going after the big guys, aren't they? Excuse me while I go for my barf bag...

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  6. what would justify receiving a valid TUE for an anabolic agent?

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    1. (assuming that the above text is implying that it's possible under certain circumstances to get a TUE for stanozolol? what circumstances?)

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    2. It is used to treat hereditary angioedema. Presumably if there were a tennis player that was born with this condition, a TUE would be granted. Also used to mitigate osteoporosis and anemia. http://www.steroidsmd.com/winstrol/

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    3. Hereditary angioedema looks wicked. Yikes.

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    4. I'm just going to start going to MTracy for all my medical information.

      Yeah, there are circumstances where using steroids/anabolic agents are an absolute must in order to stay alive, but I wonder if that fits any of the tennis players who get TUEs.

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    5. Most drugs have actual medical uses. Obviously dopers know and use this. You just need a m.d. friend and voila, you can have any TUE you can think of.

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    6. There wouldn't be much likelihood that a young male professional tennis player would have a testosterone deficiency, but you could say that about mixed martial artists and they are finally (supposedly) cracking down on all the TUE for 'roids for those guys. What happens is that the athlete has been juiced for so long that he cannot make his own testosterone and actually does have a testosterone deficiency. Then he applies for a TUE, since he can prove with a blood test that his testosterone is low.

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  7. What's going on with Janko Tipsarevic? He hasn't played all year. Pulled out of Chennai where he was defending champion, citing a heel injury and hasn't been seen since. Silent ban?

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    1. We can only speculate, but the rise of this journeyman to the top of the game was always highly suspect.

      For what it's worth, he is one of the few players who I'm 99.9% certain is (or was at a certain point) a doper (the others: Agassi, Nadal, Djokovic, Ferrer, Williams sisters, Errani, Stosur...).

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    2. Memories...
      http://tennishasasteroidproblem.blogspot.com/2011/05/knocking-me-out-with-those-serbian.html

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    3. Oh my God... I had never seen that for some reason. Yikes!

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    4. ewwww I didn't need to see that again.

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    5. I noticed those weird spots near the thighs... Incidentally, I was watching this: http://issues.tennistuesday.net/5-6-2014/p/6 specifically, Vika's selfie. I noticed the same kind of spots in a similar area. Then I watched: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dw_KAvnwWhg/Uzww1vl26EI/AAAAAAABL5A/ErixFY0GVQc/s1600/Maria-Sharapova-Bikini-Beach-03.jpg (you're welcome) and I was a smaller spot near the same area too!

      That lead me to: http://books.google.com.mx/books?id=zJ9IOdnm5mQC&pg=PA129&lpg=PA129&dq=doping+thigh+injections&source=bl&ots=qNTGQHeoIr&sig=XxE7q4aE7GjjNgbWhC5oBLJY4_g&hl=es-419&sa=X&ei=AfRrU-a6BqGSyQHZsYCwDg&ved=0CFMQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=doping%20thigh%20injections&f=false

      Am I just being paranoid? xD

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    6. and I watched* a smaller spot near the same area too!

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    7. Speaking of Azarenka, what has happened to her? she's been a non-factor since the Australian Open, having only played one match since then which she lost. She's now disappeared from tour. They say it's injury...

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  8. This sounds like routine doping at Futures level, only exposed because of some non-routine testing. Why otherwise would players risk showing up at a tournament glowing with steroids?

    There's plenty of amateurs doing it too, playing the ITF seniors tournaments. It's easy enough when you're older to claim, or convince yourself, your use of testosterone or HRT therapy as legitimate even if it does break the rules. This is the age of medical redemption after all.

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  9. I just saw Nadal hit a 171 kph forehand return-of-serve winner in Madrid. It was faster than his opponent's serve - and his return wasn't even a flat drive, it was looped topspin. As Nadal resumes to routinely crushing his opposition in Madrid it's quite clear he can't be running scared of the bio passport; whatever issue he might have had with his doping programme in his previous two tournaments appears to be thoroughly sorted.

    I have watched all the great champions since Laver. Nadal is the first who evokes disgust when I watch him play. It is impossible to see how an athlete can be natural and play the way this android - and none before him - is able to do.

    In the meantime, the ITF resumes nailing the real drug cheats on the tour - juniors on the Futures circuit.

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    1. Nadal's (and pretty much everyone else with money to spare) medical team is surely experimenting with the doping regime. In this case, There's no coincidence about the huge fluctuations of some player's performances or about the recently body fragility of others. Such a shame that pretty much the whole top 10 seems quite shaky this season. Fed's stamina, Gasquet, Nole's and Delpo's health, Wawrinka's focus, Murray's and Nadal's everything.

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  10. According to Agassi, Nadal is best ever to play tennis: http://espn.go.com/tennis/story/_/id/10901358/andre-agassi-said-rafael-nadal-greatest-tennis-player-ever-not-roger-federer

    If Agassi says it, then it must be true... :P

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  11. I don't follow the WTA tour but I have just read that S. Williams retired from Madrid and Rome citing a left thigh injury. Anyone saw her in pain the other days or is this one of her ghost injuries?

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  12. Berdych is one of the heaviest hitters on the tour. He is also 4" taller than Nadal but currently on court against the Spaniard here in Madrid he just can't hurt him, such is the Spaniard's vastly superior power and defense. If you have any doubts on the Nadal-doping issue you only have to ask yourself how could doping improve Nadal's game. In his present form, it is impossible to contemplate. I think we are seeing the full pharmacy at work here.

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    1. It's Madrid here. I bet he's even backed up by the administration itself to hide any kind vitamins he likes to have.

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    2. Roland Garros is fast approaching, it's important for his doctors to work out any kinks in his doping program, it seems to be paying off now.

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    3. Berdych has also lost 17 times in a row against Nadal - Nadal is playing poorly yet still beats Berdych because he (Berdych) has no belief that he can beat him.

      I have no idea how Nadal will play at Roland Garros - it will be interesting to see how he plays at Rome this week.

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  13. So... Nishikori got himself injured and Nadal, playing badly, still won. Do you think his new doping regime has less prolonged effects so that, when he arrives to the semis or finals, the effects are practically null?

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  14. Curious use of xenon in tennis: http://xenair.com/xenon_athletic_lung_fitness.html lists "tennis players" as potential users -- any idea which "tennis players" this is? But, I guess xenon is not a steroid. And seems to be allowed (for now) http://cyclingtips.com.au/2014/03/xenon-gas-as-a-performance-enhancing-drug-doping-or-just-hot-air/

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  15. It appears that gluten-intolerant people aren't really intolerant to gluten. They just have some degree of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.
    http://uproxx.com/gammasquad/2014/05/gluten-intolerance-is-likely-utterly-fake/
    http://www.aboutibs.org/site/treatment/low-fodmap-diet/
    Can someone report this to Djokovic?

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  16. http://www.sportsnet.ca/hockey/nhl/nhl-lacks-effective-drug-testing-program/

    Not just tennis with a steroid problem

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. Out of the "Big 4" sports, hockey has the worst drug testing program of them all (not that MLB/NBA/NFL drug testing programs are stellar either); there are several of those in the NHL who insist hockey doesn't have a doping problem (which is ludicrous).

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    3. What happened with the blood bags from the operation puerto trial? Has WADA get them?

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    4. @ayahabayboz:

      I know the Spanish judge ordered that they be destroyed (how convenient) and that WADA and the UCI were appealing. I did a Google search and couldn't find anything recent (maybe other posters will have better luck).

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  17. Pretty impresssive stamina fom Nadal. Wins Madrid last week, comes to Rome, plays 6 h in the first 2 matches, beats Murray in another long one, running like a bunny after 2h30. And this from a guy that suffers a career threating injury each year.

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  18. veins on his arms....... wow

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  19. The most amazing fact with Nadal is his ability to play perfectly at the end of a marathon match...Typical doping stuff.

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  21. As a Murray fan, I can live with him being beaten in a fair fight. However being beaten by an obvious doper really sticks in my craw. I feel for the other two players Nadal has beaten in this particular instalment of the current farce that is tennis. I also watched Ferrer losing to Djokovic. Whilst I suspect both of them of indulging in the dark arts, the cigarette smoking Ferrer who unlike Federer is showing no signs of his age is sickening me almost as much as Nadal. Whilst I appreciate that many on this forum also suspect Murray, the fact that unlike Nadal he actually had an injury requiring surgery to treat it, and has had such a rocky road to returning to form gives me even more belief that he is clean - naive as that view might be. If Nadal wins the French Open again I shall consider tennis beyond hope.

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    1. Ferrer has never fully answered questions about his "work" with Dr. Del Moral (the doping doctor who also "helped" Eranni, Kirilenko, Safina and others).

      I wonder how serious Djokovic's wrist injury truly is. Wrist injuries are serious business in tennis - they've ended careers. Look at Del Potro who still hasn't fully recovered from the wrist injuries he sustained 4 years ago, yet Djokovic is playing like nothing happened. Well, like Nadal and his knees, and Serena with all her "injuries" (funny how she's only "injured" whenever she loses), Djokovic can always use "my wrist hurts" as an excuse if he loses at the French.

      Nadal is playing like crap, but he seems very dialed in right now - we'll see how he plays against Dimitrov, but Nadal is still the favorite at the French until someone beats him. I guess he found his "magic formula."

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    2. Wrists are indeed delicate matters, but just as a little note, Delpo injured his right wrist years ago, and now it's the left one that it's giving him problems.

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  22. About the TUE, can anyone explain what drugs are allowed for the treatment of: knee or back injury, mono, ADHD, OCD. also for how long will the TUE be valid for such "illnesses"?

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  23. Maybe it's just me. But, Grigor arms are getting bigger.

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    1. If they are, they didn't help him today. Of course I did notice the huge veins popping out of Nadal's arms. What's that all about?

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    2. Grigor has huge vains on his arms too, that what made me notice, because he wasn't always that big in the upper body. maybe he's working out harder who knows.

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    3. Some of the commentators this year have talked about Dimitrov working hard on his fitness.

      Regarding veins on the dominant playing arm, it's really not uncommon or necessarily indicative of anything. See this photo of Rod Laver for example (unless you think Laver was also doping) http://www.worldtennismagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/rod-laver.jpg

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    4. Then difference is that Nadal's arms have veins popping even when they're at rest. Not just when he's hitting the ball.

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  24. The only loser whenever Nadal wins is tennis.

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  25. Right on mark, Iwan Peter.
    P.S.By the way, everyone: am I suffering from "double-vision", or does El Torro of late really has to touch most of the significant parts of his personality *twice* before serving? For, if so, I'm afraid he'll need a lot more medication for his eternally decaying knees - and that might be bad news (for us fans), what with all the side-effects medications may cause.

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  26. Well, so much for Nadal being exhausted by his epic battle with Murray, not too mention the other 3 set matches he has just played. He went through the fresh Dimitrov, like a knife through butter. Yet there are still people who believe this guy is clean. It defies belief.

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  27. Iwan Peter: spot on. Nadal alone is killing tennis more than all the other cheaters united.

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  28. Looks like we're going to have the double whammy today: Serena wins the women's title in Roma and up next - Djokodal. If Nadal wins his confidence going into RG will be sky-high (but as usual he'll say he's not the favourite). I guess the testing in Rome is as ancient as the ruins.

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