Saturday, September 6, 2014

Federer on Cilic

From the US Open....

Q. You have been outspoken person about antidoping. Are you at all uncomfortable losing to somebody who only last year was convicted of an antidoping violation?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I'm fine with it. I truly believed he didn't do anything wrong in the sense that he did it on purpose. Was he stupid maybe? Maybe. You know, yeah. But I feel like I know him well enough, and I don't think he would ever do it. I don't quite remember what the circumstances were, but I feel more bad for him than anything else. So for me, when I see him it doesn't cross my mind in any way. And, no, I think he was becoming the player he is already way before that, so from that standpoint no problem for me.

103 comments:

  1. well I don't know what else he was supposed to say, Anything negative towards Cilic would be seen as sour grapes. Such is the state of the game I once loved. Now whenever someone plays out of their skin, as happened today in both matches, my first thought is, this guy is getting help. And it's really the anti-doping bodies who are to blame for not being transparent and failing to do their job. Cilic may very well have just been stupid but why did he say he was injured rather than tell the truth, that he accidentally took some tablets that contained an illegal substance. Then I probably would have given him the benefit of the doubt. Instead it just stunk like all of Nadal's supposed injuries.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cilic didn't accidently take anything. You cannot confuse Coramine tablets which is a medicine with the bulk glucose that Cilic said he normally took with his creatine stacks. He couldn't admit to what he did - use a known stimulant in training where it isn't banned - because under strict liability he would then have committed a definite doping offence as he knew what he had taken, albeit out of competition. So he lies and said he thought he was just taking glucose as he usually did, despite the Coramine tablets having a clear 'dopage' warning on both its packet and leaflet.

      Delete
    2. Thanks, Peter. This is exactly why I won't give Cilic the benefit of a doubt.

      Concerning Federer, what else is he gonna say?

      Maybe the below quote from his previous presser is unintendedly more revealing... When asked about Cilic and his doping-suspension he quiped this about his oponents improvement since returning: "(Cilic is) playing really nice, you know. I must say he's really cleaned up his game."

      Indeed, he cleaned up.


      source: http://www.tennis.com/pro-game/2014/09/federer-prepared-tough-semifinal-against-cilic/52696/

      Delete
    3. Let's not also forget that before 2013 Cilic "missed" two out of competition tests.

      Delete
    4. Cilic is a proven doper, that much we know. He is also noticeably bigger physically than he was three or four years ago. Whether he did it through doping or not is a matter of speculation. He has also improved technically, no doubt about that. He used to have a dodgy forehand kink which his coaches have managed to iron out. So he's certainly cleaned up his game. The power he applied yesterday on his groundstrokes was impressive.

      Delete
    5. Peter Gilson speaking the truth - good breakdown of the CIlic situation.

      Sadly, it's gotten to the point where a player says they're injured and in the back of my mind I'm thinking "silent ban." CIlic tried to pass off his drug suspension as an injury and still thinks he did nothing wrong.

      Delete
    6. Cilc really improved his tactics. New coach helping a lot. He always had a ton of talent, just like the other giants, wasn't sure how to cover for lack of movement and stamina.

      I also had learned from some contacts that he really did make a mistake and was innocent - doesn't mean that's true either.

      Here's the thing - I suspect people more when I see huge inconsistencies - Serena lately and Nadal for a long time top this list. But Cilic hasn't really shown such inconsistencies. Also a player who will play unfair on the court (fake MTOs for ex) would be more likely to cheat off the court as well. I don't see this with Cilic - always a very fair player.

      But I do have some doubts.

      Here's why - he has always had a stamina issue. Now he seems to be much stronger. He says it's because his new coach worked him harder and he is pushing harder mentally when he's tired. Ok I can buy that - maybe - BUT

      his first Semifinal in so many years and after being out of tennis for a time and no nerves?? Are you kidding? It could happen - maybe a Perfect Storm - he has been steadily getting better and actually played well this summer - just lost some close matches.

      Cilic - I"m up in the air - like I am with so many. Only a few do I feel strongly that something fishy is going on.

      Delete
    7. Thanks for the comment Drew, do your contacts also have any insights as to the other players that might be using PEDs?

      Delete
    8. Yes, but I want to refrain from all that ATM. I have been in contact with someone in particular since 2009. Even for him though it's somewhat speculative. It's a tricky business as the Star system is huge business and very well protected and maintained.

      It's very dificult as an individual who really just wants true competition in sport and no cheating to not get caught up in all this crap and lose perspective. Sport stopped being about competition first and foremost a long time ago. Bobby Jones saw this coming a long time before that. He saw the art, science and beauty in sport. At least Golf for sure. I see it the same way. We can all grow from it. Hopefully one day we will so understand the competition as greater than the individual that cheating won't even be a consideration

      Delete
    9. Adding to the above...as we all know, sport is just a microcosm of the society we live in. Our society is ruled by money and controlled by the big dogs with the goal to induce the masses to spend their money as they see fit. It's no different. But sport is maybe a place to start since it's not as complicated. Complicated, yes, but not like the complications of a huge society involving life death situations.

      Delete
    10. I have been saying the same thing for a while now. Corruption rises in all areas of a civilization in parallel. Similar decay can be seen in politics, business, the entertainment industry, courts,...

      The most obvious, and easily measurable metric reflecting the decay of civilization, is the rise of government debt. The debt in most countries keeps climbing, and no political will is evident to control it. The situation is not sustainable.

      If you remember how the Greek default (who was bailed out by Germany) roiled the investment markets, wait until a giant country like the USA goes bankrupt. It's not going to be pretty.

      Delete
  2. Perhaps the ITF are artificially making the 'generation change' in tennis, by controlling the doping inffluence. But that's weird considering Fed is the main cash cow and the USTA just abused in their marketing this year. I hope today's ''unexpected'' defeats increase the pressure on the ITF from media and the fanatic fed/djokovic fans alike. I hope.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. what? This makes zero sense.

      Delete
    2. I suppose you didn't read it, then. I made two points. Both points assume that the ITF is doing the minimal effort to maintain the sport clean. You can agree with me on that, right?
      One point states that Cilic is doped And Fed isn't. Which is a little weird considering Fed's success under ITF supervisition (you know, 17 Slams xD). The ITF is in charge of anti-doping. We're still in the same page, right?
      Anyway, Cilic's doped, Fed isn't. Why? Why Fed wouldn't dope? We have seen the weird performances this USO of Murray and Djokovic. They weren't even close to previous Slams' performances. They got tired pretty quickly compared to their own previous performances in the AO for example. It looks like they were semi-clean. It the big dopers were semi-clean, perhaps Fed too. But why would that be true if the ITF is expecting a huge revenue by using their stars in top form? Specially Fed?
      These are 2 contradicting points. Which obviously makes no sense if both are assumed to be true.

      Delete
  3. this site has become a fed fan page imo anytime you mention fed about 20 people reply quickly giving reasons to why he is not. also anyone is accused these days nishikori , date krumm wawrinka etc. back in like 2009 when i read this blog regularly only people who were suspicous were accused for example david ferrer is losing takes a break comes back and thrashes his opponent or gasquet and his excuse for the doping ban that is suspicious. these days suspicious on this site means having a good grand slam result after having poor results in warm up events or when a player blows away an opponent in the semis or finals.going back to the federer part i dont think hes doping i think he is clean and is one of the few players who when giving interviews about doping looks honest and not as if he is hiding something. but when you see comments like "fed reacted normally to having played a five set match or fed is the last clean champion in our game. especially during the cilic match i saw a comment saying that cilices box looked too pumped up and like they were on drugs too.maybe they were just excited to see him on his way to a first gs final. i used to post links to this site showing the blog on nadal or the analysis of quotes by former players but now the debates are only a few comments long before the topic switches to a match that is currently going on .im sure when the creator made this he didnt want it to turn out like this. a site where people make excuses as to why their fav player is losing or a site where anyone who does well in a tournie is accused i mean seeing nishikori accused as being suspicious was the final straw for me. his game style is attacking and not a boring baseline game that just returns the ball into play like many on this site complain about with other players and he has a great coach and fitness team and he was given 3 days off.thats one day in bed relaxing and having ice baths the next spent going out for restaurants and seeing friends and the 3rd practising thats more than enough to get back to full fitness for a semifinal.to conclude im not saying you guys should have a fav palyer such as fed or murray just stop the obvious bias in the comments and the pointing fingers without anything other than " he played bad in the masters and now he is playing good in the grand slams" i still read this blog though as there are some fair posters that dont just accuseplayers for fun . to name a few the creator thasp, drew, mrn10sdave

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I apologize for the Cilic box comment, that was me. Sure fitness coaches have to look buff, or else you would not hire them. But my impression was that these guys look like on roids. It's the type of muscles that bodybuilders have and I personally think don't belong into the game of tennis.

      When we comment on live games, it is related to rpevious debates about form - which I consider an indicator of where a certain player is physcially and what can be expected of him or her. Dumps or unexpected rises are part of what can make a player suspicious, hence the commenting. A comment is also an invite for a debate among us, something which I enjoy here. Needless to say, we ALL don't know for sure what is going on in a player - yet, I think it is fair game to observe this and express as well as explain that phenomenon here. Especially in a thread that starts of devoted to Cilic.

      One topic here is how exactly players can get hold of PED's and who is involved. From other sports it has been revealed how much the team, the physios can function as facilitators or enablers. This is were my box comment was stemming from. Prior to Ivanisevic taking over the coaching duties, I simply did not notice that such a group of people were surrounding Cilic.I understand it rubs you and others the wrong way, but it could be an indicator of something. Or not. I am aware of that.

      First and foremost I am a tennis-tard, to modify your accusation. And when we debate certain matches, it is about the state of tennis that we are concerned with, as it is visible before our eyes, and not individual names, though they inevitably will come up, it is unavoidable. That said, I do appreciate a more varied/attacking style of play than just big serves and baseline rallies, that is my personal bias I am aware of. Also, we have been going over the structural flaws of tennis anti-doping programm, its protagonists, its weaknesses, loop holes etc - and unless new facts come to light, there will be the inevitable talk about players performances with a known doping suspension history or related doping cases, like BIOGENESIS.

      Do post here, don't stop. The more reasonable voices are participating, the better it gets. However, when talking about doping, the issue of form and fitness and previous results will inevitable be discussed. Many folks here a good knowledge of tennis and a players history and sudden dips as well as peaks should not be off limits here.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for replying . I think I went a bit over the top saying its a fed fan page

      Delete
    3. It terms of getting their hands on PEDS, it would seem that the ITF just told all the players about a new and undetectable PED which seems to be generally commercially available without any prescription. I think the top guys were probably using xenon for years, but once the ITF gave it all the publicity, then pretty much everyone started using it. Simple to use, undetectable, you can buy it over the internet. Explains a lot.

      Delete
    4. Well, it's fair to say there is bias around here. But while we're all respectful, even the bias should contribute something to the general debate. When we start attacking each other because our suspicions are directed to players others don't want to be doped (because of people's own bias), then we're not going anywhere. It's even bad for the cause (fighting for a cleaner tennis). So, I hope team_kickass and Lopi stop with their strange indirect derogatory comments directed to me (for including Fed in the talks) and hope to talk in a friendly manner in the future.

      Delete
    5. I don't know. I'm a Federer fan and I think he is not beyond suspicion. The signs of a doper aren't as clear as with the others when it comes to him, but that is perhaps because we tend to constrain our idea of Federer as a constant from 2004 onwards.

      What other Federer fans think is not my concern; I'd like to see tennis cleaned up for the sake of the future of the game's aesthetics and those juniors who may not want to dope in future.

      Do I think Nishikori or Cilic are doping? More than likely.

      Delete
  4. One important issue that is overlooked is the mental side of the game. The will, the determination, the desire and the killer instinct. All these are essential to become a "big four". These must come together with being an outstanding athlete (obviously PEDs would help and probably have helped the majority of professional players) and being good with the racket.
    Cilic was lacking in the mental side obviously lacking consistency/belief. He has that now, very likely helped by being really annoyed with the ban and the "unfair" treatment that he seems to believe "discriminatory".

    I think that unlilke Wawrinka, who seems to still lack killer instinct, Cilic will stay at the top for a while.

    Nishikori has shown potential for a while now , and particularly this year belief is showing.

    They will stay with the big 4 and dethrone them I believe.

    I cannot say I was sorry to see Fed go, it is so annoying to listen to the screams of the fans that only want to see Fed winning, regardless of who is playing better.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Forget Cilic's "mental side". Your own could do with a bit of work. A sudden boost in "confidence" by a journeyman mid-career, along with a dramatic improvement in form, goes hand-in-hand with doping. And we know he is a doper.

      Delete
    2. People still believe he's innocent. And they figure he's done his time so give him a break. hmmmm a murderer is a murderer even after he's done his time. Likewise a doper is still a doper.

      Delete
    3. richard
      "Forget Cilic's "mental side". Your own could do with a bit of work"

      :-)
      That made me laugh, but still define you I am afraid

      "A sudden boost in "confidence" by a journeyman mid-career, along with a dramatic improvement in form, goes hand-in-hand with doping."

      Cilic a journeyman? as usual, keep thinking you are high up, somewhere over good and evil (the clever clever land :-)

      He might be a doper (I never said anything different if you can read) but he is no journeyman, 11 titles and 9 finals (most on fast hard courts of course), he is only 25 and has been consistently top 20 or close since 2008. His winning percentage at US and AO is over 70%, (without this years results) with one SF, 2QF and several 4R... He has also made QF at wimby and several 4R at RG,
      If that is your definition of journeyman...
      It is no surprise that he has made it to the final, and it would not be a surprise if he beats Nishikori. The surprise would have been seeing a 33 year old win his 18 major and being top of the ATP race for this year.

      My point, in case you did not understand yet, is that I believe he is quite a good player, and that after this (mental) breakthrough you are going to see quite more of him, like it or not.

      Delete
    4. "The surprise would have been seeing a 33 year old win his 18 major and being top of the ATP race for this year."

      It's almost like he doesn't know that Federer is no Cilic. Federer didn't come out of nowhere, you idiot. He's been at the top of the game for a good while.

      Delete
    5. There was a great article out there about a guy playing on HGH and more than the incredible physical stamina was the feeling of invincibility it game him. He started to feel sorry for his opponent because he knew there was nothing his opponent could do to beat him. He would eventually wear him down

      Doping helps mental possibly more than physical.

      Delete
    6. Doping helps the modern tennis player with the mental side of things. If you know you can be physically on top of your game for 5 sets, there really is nothing to fear. Now if it was super fast tennis courts where one strike tennis (i.e. serve and return) was a large factor, then the mental side we speak of is true.

      Tennis is a different game now. What was true in 1994 or 2004 is certainly not true in 2014.

      Delete
    7. They are called "PERFORMANCE ENHANCING" drugs for a reason. Don't you think that a player who has enhanced physicality (extra strength, speed, and stamina) would develop extra "confidence", and "mental toughness" ?

      Delete
  5. Justin Gatlin's once world record 9.77sec 100 meters was annulled because he failed doping tests. He was banned twice. most recently 2006-2010. He was a Balco Boy.

    Yesterday, Gatlin, now 32 years old, ran 9.77 again. Press response has mainly been "Amazing Justin is Amazing".

    #undetectable #notbuyingit

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was listening to BBC 5 Live sport on Friday evening and the commentators were discussing Gatlins Diamond league effort. The general mood was was of disbelief and they were appalled at the idea of him being an Olympic champion should Bolt be injured.

      I'm not defending the BBC, to the contrary I'm mystified how they and no other media outlet has yet picked up on Cilic's lack of credibility. It is this lack of scrutiny in the media that worries me more than the doping.

      Delete
    2. Probably depending where the media headlines cane from. Since Gatlin is American, wouldn't surprise me if the laudatory quotes are from American media.

      He's undefeated this year in races and holds 7 of the top 10 fastest race times in 2014. There's no doubt in my mind he's still doping. None whatsoever.

      Delete
    3. I suspect the press are afraid of legal repercussions if they call his achievements a farce.

      Gatlin's quote after the win "The crowd gave me a lot of energy."

      I guess Conti's "The Clear" has been replaced by The Crowd" lol.

      Delete
  6. I just read 4 articles on the Cilic win (espn, BBC Sport, tsn and the Guardian) and not one of them mentioned his ban. How quickly we forget. Amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Strength And Mobility For Tennis Program
    When you and the pros wait longer on the outside leg before hitting the ball, you will feel more natural power once you make contact.
    You want to avoid getting on the front foot too early before you actually make contact with the ball.
    So many recreational players think they need to step in on the return of serve. Sure, you can step in if the ball is coming super slow and you have a lot of time, but in most cases serves will come faster and it’s important to have the right timing so that you transfer the weight from the back foot to front foot. This is a return of serve lesson every player should know.

    watch :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sOJvUHLWZ9M

    ReplyDelete
  8. This is a great talk from Frank Shorter, who was one of the folks who set up USADA.

    Lots of interesting observations, including MLB piloting hGH testing in the minor leagues, and simultaneously moving the most promising athletes to the majors, and never playing them, so (presumably) they wouldn't be tested.

    He also points out that the IOC, when it announced EPO test, told athletes that the new test was sensitive for 72 hours after administration!!!!

    He said "you can't police and promote" again and again. This is so true. Paging Dr Miller.



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9LB0bSQbgTw

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, great link. The Epo detection window revealed reminds me of Verbrueggen telling Armstrong how testing works, giving him a tour of the lab and basically revealing how much their testing was able to detect...

      My impression is that tennis pro's know only too well how far they can go, doping-wise - and how to prevent detection. Cilic getting caught was just stupidity, a slip up which got leaked.

      Delete
  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I am not watching the women's final. There's a very, very small chance Wozniacki can pull off the upset and I have better things to do with my day. Let me know if anything super-interesting happens.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I recommend an article labeled Serena Sweet Eighteen. By the way, in tennis this is how you sneeze: EighhhhhEighhhhhEighhhteeeeeeeeeeeeeeeennnnnnnnnnnn.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Serena ties Chrissy and Martina. 6 more to tie Margaret Court's record of 24.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret Court won those 24 slams by age 31. Serena's already past that age.

      But if you add Venus's tainted slams to Serena's it's already the record.

      Delete
    2. Nobody really cares about the 24 slams. Tennis is not a skirt competition anymore

      Delete
  13. Caroline needs to get herself some of what Serena's having... And a panic room to go along with it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just an honest drug tester would do the trick.

      Barring that what Caroline needs is a Williams free draw. Plenty of women have won slams without having to face either of those cheaters and plenty more will in the future.

      Delete
    2. LopiLopi, Serena is a strong black woman. You just can't give that away

      Delete
    3. "LopiLopi, Serena is a strong black woman. You just can't give that away"

      Most black women don't look like that roidmonster.

      Delete
  14. Cilic I'm not sure (see post above), but Serena is definitely something fishy going on. Middle of the week she was a mess - blatantly. Supposedly she was having more episodes in her practice session yesterday. Was caught on camera by some.

    Today she's a maniac again. And though she was breathing heavy (I still don't think she's 100% and maybe carrying too much weight again) she was able to run all day with Wozniacki. I would have loved to seen Caroline make more balls , push to 3 , but it looks like Serena wasn't going to tire unless her body completely gave way and she had a muscle tear for example - like maybe in her back for example...

    I think there's tons going on behind the scenes with Serena - we have no idea. Bottom line - after a busy summer something wasn't right again with her and something was done about it. This time it worked out. 3 sets with Caroline - who knows - but whatever was done was after sometime between the Lepchenko match and the Pennetta match - IMHO.

    It's a shame because there is incredible strategy and new players coming out on both sides that is making this game fun again. Wozniacki has tweaked her game more than these commentators or regular fans can see. It's awesome. What do some players do - take something else - that's their answer - not strategy - and that pisses me off.

    And most fans love it - she's a Super Hero to them - a real life super hero - not just in the movies. Strong women are ones that survive a bad relationship and make huge comebacks after years of ridicule. Not ones that pump up to enormous strength stamina levels then crush other women with their manly strength.

    And btw, I love Venus - and it's amazing what Richard did to bring these girls into this world. And I don't think Serena doped all her life. I think it's actually helped her more mentally than anything else. And this week it may have even been a legal substance - who knows. But something happened in the middle of this tournament. Just like something happened at Wimbledon. And it's not a flu bug

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Serena, Rafa, same mess.

      Tennis has a major (lol...) PED problem. The day it blows open, everyday will say "it was obvoius, everybody already knew, lol!", but until then, most fans/journalists will continue eating the lies they are fed all the time by these capricious tennis brats and say "innocent until proven guilty" - trust your own eyes, people (preaching to the choir a bit here, but I need to vent). You cannot trust anything the players and or the sports media are spouting about these days.

      Anyways, have a great end of the season guys and brace yourselves for the Great Nadal Resurrection 5.0 (or something like that) coming to you soon, be it at the WTF or at the Australian Open.

      P.S. I also predict fragile Rafa will - once again - miraculously not get hurt during the next clay court swing - unless he loses before the finals, of course... :P

      Delete
    2. I'm actually surprised there aren't more people on here venting. Used to be when Miss Panic Room won a slam there'd be a lot more.

      Maybe people just aren't watching and don't care anymore.

      Delete
    3. I guess most of us have just given up. I mean what's the point really? Even when a player tests positive, their sentence is reduced, points and prize money reinstated etc. and it makes you wonder why bother? Now a previously suspended player has made a slam final and no one talks about it. It's like it didn't happen and everyone says he was exonerated. LOL. So that's what it's called? Poor Troicki. If only he had known, he would have given the sample and been on his way. Let this be a lesson to the cheats: Give the sample because it makes no difference anyway. And congrats to Serena. She showed them!

      Delete
    4. @dave453:

      I think a lot of people have given up (as Lopi mentioned above). Despite the mountains of evidence this blog and others have produced about the paucity of testing, players associated with questionable individuals, engaging in questionable treatments and being involved in questionable scenarios, the tennis media and most of the fans just don't care and/ore refuse to probe and ask the difficult questions.

      Despite the examples of Lance Armstrong and other sports, most people stick their head in the sand and spout the myth that tennis is "clean" and the fans believe them.

      There have been many posts on here about these issues, but getting people outside this blog to care has been difficult. No one wants to rock the boat. A few posts down they have Bitti basically saying it would be bad for the sport if any of the stars tested positive. They have an incentive to cover up any positives and to have a lack of testing. You can't catch dopers if you don't test them.

      It is exhausting to keep caring about this and I think a lot of people have tuned out - whether emotionally or tennis in general. We used to have a lot more posters on here, but I think some have just thrown up their hands in frustration because nothing has changed or will change. Unless some huge scandal breaks (w/names released) or there is a whistleblower (again, w/names released), tennis will continue to insist that it is clean.

      Delete
    5. Pretty much.

      I am admittedly a Federer fan and even with a very good 2014 year (for his "old age" standards), I have watched very few matches this year. I am also out of the loop sometimes as I don't follow the tour as much as I did in years past. It has become exhausting/frustrating to care about this sport. I am tuning out.

      My son is 8 and has been playing 2 times a week for 2 years now. He's not too bad either (pretty snappy forehand, terrible serve and mediocre backhand though). Anyways, I try not to be too close to the pros/teachers at this private club because they live in denial and are in awe of the pros. I encourage my son, though I am pretty happy that he shows way more interest in baseball - not that this sport doesn't have its whole set of issues regarding dopers and cheaters, but at least it is tackling the problem head on, which NO other major sports is even attempting. It is worth mentioning.

      Bottom line: f**k the ITF, the ATP and the spineless, sycophant reporters. There aren't many Woodward and Bernstein roaming the ATP tour press conference sites, that is a given.

      Delete
    6. Wow. Maybe it's time for some Woodward &Bernstein. I think today's world pretends to be cutting edge but up it may be more cookie cutter than the 50s. Mainly because it seems we are all so addicted in one sense or another. Myself included.

      What this means for sports is Addicted to the Star Machine. I have a tennis and football site. Tenniscrier.com & powerspread.net. I bring a different perspective and seem to rock the boat wit the most innocent theories. Such as different types of tennis balls make a difference in the game. Or schemes in basketball or football actually make a big difference. Forget about mentioning doping. I did that back in 2010 and was immediately banned from many websites. I've since been reinstated with some. Tennis forums now let's us speak about doping but the were one of the sites that suspended me in 2010. I'd like to think I had a part to play in them letting us speak of doping now.

      I am renovating my tennis site and thinking of ways to approach this whole subject of a dumbed down mass of people. Besides a consolidated tennis site where people can more easily follow this wide spread sport, I would like to talk about deeper significance of the sport. Of course, cheating and Star obsession would fall in this category. But it takes so little to rile feathers. Even a guy like Brad Gilbert who seems really cool and an original has to really tow the line. Same with Martina Navratilova.

      If anyone has any suggestions for my revamped site I'd love to hear. Maybe I should just be bold and brave and talk about whatever I want. Even at the cost of offending or irritating so many. Or is that just stupid self sabotage?

      Delete
    7. Going back to Apancheful post where he/she had a little moment of overall fed-up-ness with this blog and folks mentioning players or judging their performances, I think I would like to stress that it has become harder to add new elements to what we already have agreed upon here after years of reading on this blig /following tennis/ reading about PED's and their scandals over the years. It feels a bit like going in circles.

      Still, I like this place to vent some air whenever I see/read something suspicious. I have the feeling that this public forum, despite its flaws to some, is good at getting it out in the open and start a discussion (in a mostly polite fashion) that otherwise is not desired, in fact, swept under the carpet.

      There might be moments of rashness and of course speculation, but there is also a solid base of factual analysis, stats and CAS verdicts are being read, also statements from players scrutinized. And there is a fair amount of media watch going on here. Corruption is being discussed (USTA scandal, just to name one example) here and other doping cases used as comparison. The occasional live-post during particularly eyebrowrising matches included

      So there is a bunch of varied approaches - and I bet this is increasing the pressure somewhat.

      Yet, it is despicable how little tennis media covers doping. I mean, hell, they don't even cover their own scandals - look at the sum of money the tennis.com CEO got directly out of the pockets the USTA - not a WORD about that on that to be found on their site. Yet, some dribble about Pat McEnroe resigning from the palyers develeopment program by Bodo, his buddy. This chronyism is what makes reporting on such cardinal topics nearly impossible. Tignor seems to have a gag-clause in his contract. All his beatiful prose is in vain when his sport is rottening under our eyes, when its being suffocated by this inbred tennis-mafia.

      Anyway, this place here is a good outlet for those thoughts that mainstream media shys aways from. I hope people add their 2 cents and keep posting here more frequently.

      @ Drew - be bold and ballsy would be my advice. Yet, stay to the facts. Talking about the star system is a good start.

      Delete
    8. Thanks. Not a bad idea. Though there is so much that can't be verified as fact in Tennis. Even, for example, the way a surface may play for a player. I know most of the manufacturers of the different surfaces, but they aren't going to tell me the in depth secrets of their product. I can only get so many facts before intelligent speculation. The problem with the public is they only believe "facts" from writers, but in their daily life they base so much upon speculation, intelligent or otherwise.

      I was a physics major at Bucknell in PA and I could see how the world of science was so held back by "waiting" for proof instead of moving forward with what they knew to be true. I believe that sometimes using the "Give me Facts" idea has also contributed to the dumbing down of our society. One can know something to be true without knowing facts or all the intimate details.

      We don't know for sure what's going on with Serena, but you really have to be blind to not notice that SOMETHING is going on and it doesn't seem good.

      Delete
    9. I wouldn't be surprised if Serena is forced to retire very soon with serious health problems.

      Delete
  15. Does anyone else miss the photos of players that used to be on this site years ago?

    Now the blog is just a bunch of technical reports.

    A photo speaks a thousand words as they say.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pictures tell some of the story, but not all.

      Technical reports and stats get to the meat of the story better than pictures.

      You can explain away most pics, it's tough to explain away facts/stats.

      Delete
    2. "You can explain away most pics, it's tough to explain away facts/stats."

      Unless you work for the ITF anti-doping program.

      Delete
  16. Where's Tipsarevic again? And Almagro? Just curious.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. and Soderling, and Nadal, and Haas (?).

      However, I'll give Del Potro the benefit of the doubt: first time he came back, he basically sucked for an entire year.

      Delete
    2. Soderling keeps saying he wants to come back but he has been gone for over three years now. Either he had a real serious case of mono or else he had a lengthy ban.

      Tipsarevic allegedly had surgery in May (he posted a pic on his twitter page), who knows if he's coming back. He claims he just started training again in July. Almagro beat Nadal in Barcelona and has been MIA since and no word if he is coming back.

      I believe Del Potro's wrist injury was legit since he has been a shell of himself since winning the U.S. Open in 2009. He did get to the Wimbledon semis in 2013, but that is his only decent Slam result in 5 years. He has been in and out of the sport with wrist problems ever since 2009. He's not making amazing comebacks like other players who have had serious injuries (ie. Nadal).

      I tell you, mono, lyme disease, asthma, embolisms, foot injuries, etc. - tennis players are the sickliest athletes on the planet. In no other sport do the athletes have so many illnesses, disease, and ailments.

      Delete
  17. By the way, gun to your head, who do you guys "root" for (against?) tonight?

    Cilic is a "convicted" cheater, that we know. But Nishikori, with his stamina, is highly suspicious. In the end, I'll go with Cilic: I hate the counter-attackers/never tired retrievers in the Nishikori, Nadal, Ferrer "mold".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nishikori if I was forced to choose.

      Delete
    2. I'd be rooting for maybe one decent tennis writer having the balls to call Cilic's UO run disgraceful and an outright shame for the sport of tennis.





      I know this won't happen.

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    4. It's like nothing happened, same with Troicki.

      The only thing that could shake the establishment is a Federer/Nadal/Djokovic doping scandal blowing out in the open. I mean, can intelligent, sane people who follow tennis on a daily basis truly believe in their hearts that Nadal and Djokovic never doped?

      Delete
    5. It's actually kind of nice to see two new faces in the final, and especially no Djokovic or Nadal. Whether it's because the rest of the field is catching up in the doping race, or the big guns are toning it down, I hope this trend continues. I'm not holding my breath, though; dreading the return of the bigger, faster, stronger than ever version of the robot...pray that I'm wrong!

      Delete
  18. I have watched either the entire match or extended highlights of all of Serenas matches this summer Hardcourt season. She has worked her way back into form and it was a steady progression since Wimbledon. But her play has become very inconsistent again at the US open. Everyone seems to be ignoring her play in the middle of the tournament. Great start great finish very bizarre behavior in the middle of the two weeks

    ReplyDelete
  19. I have no idea what's going on with Serena nor do any of my contacts, but somehow all this lethargic behavior in the middle of this slam is either being ignored or chalked up to Serena being crazy.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Serena was so bad in her Dubs loss. Double faulting twice in a row to lose match. Lethargic throughout. In the same kind of hot humidity vs Makarova she was fantastic.
    (Sorry about all the separate comments. My ipad is acting up!)

    ReplyDelete
  21. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  22. We didn't even need this video. For a decade or more, all you had to do was open your eyes and watch. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XwrP1zHC5Eo

    ReplyDelete
  23. Unfortunately, not everyone is built like an undercover skeleton.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Cilic is juiced to the gills. Look at his miraculous movement.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Its indeed amazing how a very tall guy like Cilic improved his movement in such a short time.

      Delete
    2. He moves like a guy who is 5' 10" now. These guys are a shame.

      Delete
    3. He was a decent mover but never like this. His serve was always a weapon, but never like this. It's ridiculous how much he "improved" over the past year.

      I remember reading articles when Petr Korda was caught doping. The other players condemned him and wanted him out of the game. Now, the other players just shrug their shoulders that a known drug cheat just won a Slam.

      Delete
    4. I actually find it shocking that no one is questioning this win. I guess they figure the ITF will test him and if he passes the test he's clean. Of course we know better. Don't we?

      Delete
    5. I remember how Ljubicic was furious when Canas came back on the tour after a doping ban. I am wondering if he will react the same way after the triumph of Cilic, his countryman, but I am not holding my breath.
      http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=125925

      Delete
  25. Is Cilic's mom in the box?


    I think her Coramine was way inferior compared with his new supply chain.

    My German commentator mentioned Cilic's buffer post-suspension physique, noted his stronger upper body and arm muscles - yet he did not connect the dots. On the contrary, he pulled the old "he is such a decent chap, so modest and humble", it was all unintentional, simply an "accident" trick.

    What a boring match though. The whole thing felt unemotional and rather cold. Cilic was business-like when receiving his trophy. The crowd was rooting for Nishikori, it seemed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. [On the contrary, he pulled the old "he is such a decent chap, so modest and humble", it was all unintentional, simply an "accident" trick. ]

      "Cilic is an honest and truthful man" - As written in the ITF report. Remember, this was published as fact as well.

      Delete
    2. Hahaha, yes that was pure comedy gold - the entire report. I did not forget, how could I, the ridiculousness of it, the stilted prose - it was my bedtime read for a while

      Oh, and not to forget this gem from Cilic during the post-match on court interview:

      “I think this is all hard work in these last several years, and especially this past year. I think my team has brought something really special to me in this past year.”

      "Hard work" uh-HUH...

      Delete
    3. It seems Cilic's team understood that cheap doping substances like nikethamide don't lead to anything.

      Delete
    4. The German TV commentator even called the time period Cilic had to serve for his doping suspension a "compulsory break" (Zwangspause), which is a nice euphemism in itfself, as if it was an unforeseen accident beyond his responsibility that is usually avoided. Only moments later, he talked how he upped his game in those four months, reiterating the myth that suspensions and injuries (i.e. silent bans) are virtually the best thing which can happen to a tennis player.

      Delete
  26. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  27. It's sort of disgraceful that a proven doper can miraculously win a major like it's nobody's business. Pure comedy. I did not watch the match. For shame.

    ReplyDelete
  28. $3 million will buy a lot of PED's.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ivanisevic and his super-buff looking "team" get half of it.




      Still, a lot of PED's.

      Delete
  29. There are quite some mixed reactions in the media regarding Cilic's win. They don't shy away to mention the ban. Yet they can only go thus far.

    Here is Mike Dickson/Daily Mail on Cilic's magic run - it is fair to say that his piece seems to be the outmost a tnenis journo is willing to say without risking their job. He rightly points out that Cilc, despite the reduction, did not get fully exonerated by CAS, they still had doubts, but eventually believed in his version. Dickson questions though whether those suspensions can be a sufficient deterrent to potential dopers.

    He seems to be equally dispappointed as some of us were about Fed's rather benevolent reaction from his post-Cilic-match presser.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/tennis/article-2747037/Marin-Cilic-doping-scandal-hangs-US-Open-final-short-bans-leave-questions-drugs-tennis.html

    Most articles turn the ban/suspension into a sort of comeback-kid story, making the most of it, finally having the time to train and tweak your game, adjusting, working on your serve, etc. Ironically , this turns the ban into something positive, noting that the long season leaves little time for improvements. Rather than looking at the sorry-state of tennis, they turn this into some survival story, beating all odds etc.

    I guess everybody should just serve a ban then and comeback all blazing and revamped!

    Will this be a new trend - getting banned to saddle the horse from the back, so to speak, to then crush the field? Nadal seems to have set the paradigm. Knee, wrist etc.

    ReplyDelete
  30. SERENA'S INTERVIEWS IN THE MIDDLE OF HER TOURNAMENT RUN
    After Lepchenko Win - Definitely seemed tired after a tough match
    http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2014-08-30/201408301409438446669.html

    After Kanepi Win - Very Sluggish after a sluggish match on a hot humid day
    http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2014-09-01/201409011409600137978.html

    After Pennetta match - Seemed 100% fine after a night match
    http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2014-09-03/201409041409806057440.html

    After Makarova match - 100% again even though this was another hot humid day (earlier Peng Shaui hit the deck)
    http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2014-09-05/201409051409959476817.html

    Check out 3:20 of the Pennetta Interview. Asking why she served so badly in Dubs. She basically blew off the question.

    None of this comes close to proving doping. Not my point. My point is to illuminate the strange lethargy by Serena midway in the tournament and then suddenly she felt great again. Ups and Downs are normal in any sport - but Serena's are extreme and do not seem to be contingent upon weather, opponent, etc..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, these rollercoaster rides in her game have been visible for a while and I agree with you, they are striking, whatever conclusion one would draw from them.

      Ususally, her sluggishness/lethargy is being explained away by her lack of motivation, superchamp she is, or by fatigue, afterall she has a long, succesful career going. Another way is to point out she hasn't yet reached her FULL potential etc...needs to get more match practice, the usual explaining away.

      I think you are on to something, and if you add this years dubs Wimby episode to it, not to forget the previous bizarre shards, panic room and embolism episodes, it is too tempting not to suspect something else.

      Delete
  31. To add - If you get a chance to see her Dubs loss with Venus - check it out. Horribly sluggish. Plus the photos caught by some people of Serena again moping around during practice on Saturday before the final.

    Along with Wimbledon and so many other incidences - Serena's fluctuating energy levels need to be examined and not swept under the rug. To say she was playing great this whole US Open is an outright lie. Maybe she has a disease too? Or maybe something else?

    ReplyDelete
  32. The FIFA has a huge bribery scandal currently going, apparently the Brazillian Football Federation have been giving away expensive watches to FIFA exo's and prominent members of football federations, worth in the five-digits, they were coming from one of the main sponsors, a watchmaker company from Switzerland. Also Hublot are invovled (sponsor at the UO).

    I wonder if the ITF or prominent tournament directors are receiving luxurious "gifts" from sponsors as well. Maybe for arranging a new sponsorship deal or kicking out a rival. With so many watchmakers as sponsors, it would suggest itself, you'd think.

    We do know that USTA money is going in the wrong pockets, not into support of up-and-coming players but to their very own CEO's pockets ventures.

    Following the intial disclosure by the NYT, this scandal still remains UNADDRESSED by tennis media. So far, no consequences whatsoever.! Same procedure as ususal over at tennis.com.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Apparently Nadal will be playing an Exhibition against Tsonga in Kazakhstan at the end of the month.

    Just curious, If a player is serving a silent ban would he be allowed to play an exhibition? I don't see why not. Then he would be able to say that the supposed injury wasn't healed and he would have to withdraw from more tournaments. Just a thought.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds a lot like the exhibition he played before Wimbledon 2009...

      Delete
    2. Exactly my thoughts, alsohere's no drug testing at exhibitions either.
      And what ever happened to Nadal receiving growth hormones, oh sorry factors (according to his PR) I guess the treatments didn't work in time for the US Open. Either that or the scrutiny he and his team received forced them to pull out.

      Delete
    3. I was thinking the same thing. A normal wrist injury has a recovery time of 4-6 weeks, exactly twice the time Nadal's team reported. It was safe to say they were planning to use an 'unorthodox' method for faster healing. But with the great Nacho's leak, seems he had to play by the rules this time, effectively doing no better than a regular man.

      Delete
  34. Nadal roid rage? It's hard to argue against this video. Comments please
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=s5nFVcVKfN8

    ReplyDelete
  35. alat bantu seks wanita, Good sir I am quite happy and satisfied with the information that the father or mother to right on this page.
    obat pria kuat
    obat kuat murah
    procomil spray

    ReplyDelete