Saturday, December 13, 2014

Blood Work

The emerging details of abnormal blood values in athletics warrants a repeat of a 2013 post of this blog.

19 comments:

  1. Assuming that the testing was indeed targeted due to abnormal blood values, the implication of the bloodwork cited is that almost all of the top players are blood doping. I think this is too much for most fans and journalists. Much like the Nandrolone scandal, when it gets to be more than a couple of athletes, it is going to be swept under the rug. There is just no reason to doubt that tennis, which still has weaker testing than cycling did during Lance Armstrong's heyday, is a cesspool of doping.

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  2. This is interesting. Who needs FOUR hours to pee? Kimiko Date-Krumm!
    http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?t=819985

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    1. It's amazing how easily people will fall for this victimization routine. You'd think after Lance, they would wise up.

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    2. and yes, no mention on any major tennis site...

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  3. http://www.tennisworldusa.org/Richard-Gasquet-Training-With-Rafael-Nadal-He-Never-Stops-He-is-Incredible-articolo21658.html

    Interesting...

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  4. In this interview, Paul Kimmage mentions interviewing Nadal, and looking (unsuccessfully) for evidence that he was implicated in the Operación Puerto scandal

    http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/latest-news/the-big-interview-paul-kimmage-88368

    For die-hards, here is a (very long) interview with Kimmage about his career, and his anti-doping status in cycling.. Lots of fascinating insights.

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    1. Here is the link
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIOjtsMTkO4

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  5. A spanish article about the controversial, and for some elite athletes, magical stem cell treatment. It was written by a former cyclist, now journalists known to cover extensively the Operation Puerto Scandal: Carlos Arribas. http://deportes.elpais.com/deportes/2014/12/24/actualidad/1419435517_036222.html

    It was an article probably inspired in Khan's joke on twitter regarding stem cell treatment for the back: https://twitter.com/BJSM_BMJ/status/541173794534989825

    In summary, no positive results are guaranteed and actually, are very unlikely to happen. It includes comments about stem cell treatments from two doctors:
    González Lago, a traumatologist that uses stem cells (among other dubious techniques like PRP: http://blogs.bmj.com/bjsm/2014/12/10/common-ground-and-continued-debate-further-response-to-strong-evidence-against-prp-injections-for-chronic-lateral-epicondylar-tendinopathy-a-systematic-review/) states that his experience with the treatment is 'good' despite not having scientific evidence that backs it up.
    And Juan Manuel Alonso, a member of IAAF's medical committee, that states he doesn't supports this kind of treatments.

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  6. Talk about making life easy for the cheats, WADA's new 2015 charter for dopers allows retrospective applications for TUEs after a player tests positive.

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    1. Needless to say, the ITF has responded enthusiastically to adopt the new loophole for dopers. See 7.5 below.

      http://www.itftennis.com/media/194233/194233.pdf

      The false TUE is the biggest doping scam going right now.

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  7. Apparently Serena lost the first set in her match against Penneta at the Hopman Cup. She then ordered an alleged cup of coffee and proceeded to crush her opponent in the remaining sets. Later on she talked about having had a jetlag, which was magically fixed in a matter of seconds by drinking some coffee. This is just as pathetic as it gets. As always, she gets a complete pass on anything she does.

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    1. And another question should be: Why is she holding that cup so oddly? Must be crazy hot, or something.
      See: https://twitter.com/gazti10/status/551948192225697793/photo/1

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    2. Isn't caffeine considered to be a stimulant and PE in competition? Why is that allowed then?

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  8. http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/jan/05/serena-williams-coffee-australian-open-warmup

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  9. TBH, I doubt there was anything nefarious going on.

    Caffeine is no longer on the WADA prohibited list, and a tournament official fetched it, not one of her entourage.

    It did look odd that she put the napkin around it when drinking, but my guess was that she was concealing the commercial branding on the outside of the cup. She has (or at least had) a Gatorade endorsement which probably requires her to not imbibe other company's products on TV. It's also possible that the tourny asked her to conceal the branding since they obviously don't have a contract with the coffee outlet for TV exposure, something other commercial entities are paying them for.

    If Serena dopes, my guess if that this is not how she goes about it

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  10. I think the point, arcs, is that the coffee was just cover for whatever stimulant she was really taking, not that the coffee itself was the delivery system.

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  11. Caffeine is in the WADA's monitoring list this year. Right now this is legal but perhaps they could request that the ITF bans it in-match.

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  12. Meanwhile in MMA: http://www.bloodyelbow.com/2015/1/7/7510649/jon-jones-out-of-competition-drug-tests-all-show-abnormal-hormone

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    1. More interesting stuff: http://www.subjectmma.com/explained-jon-jones-drug-test-scandal/

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