Saturday, January 17, 2015

Offered Without Comment

APIA INTERNATIONAL SYDNEY 
January 15, 2015
Viktor Troicki

Q.  You were sort of punished for something you didn't deliberately try to do.  Did you ever think, You know what, I'm just going to walk away because I was treated unjustly?


VIKTOR TROICKI:  Well, you know, in life anything could happen to anyone.  This thing that happened to me, I felt it was unfair.  I know‑‑ me and my coach both know what really went on in that room.  I didn't do anything wrong.
I just followed the doctor's instructions.  That was my mistake.  I learned something.  It was a life lesson definitely.  The start was probably very, very hard.  Mentally I was very down.  I didn't play for some time at all.  For sure it was tough to focus on anything.  I mean, I needed some time off from everything.
Yeah, it was fun in the start.  I did some things that I couldn't do before.  I just relaxed and enjoyed the time off.  After that I started missing it.  I started thinking about tennis and how much I like it and how much I want to get back.
That's what pushed me to get back even stronger.  So that's the whole thing.

[...]

Q.  Did you feel you had to always defend yourself?  Did you feel embarrassed?

VIKTOR TROICKI:  No.  Well, if you read the case, I was tested and I was clean.  I never took anything.  Deep in myself I know that I didn't do anything wrong.  Just it was too many unlucky things happened in that room that day.
It was just a nightmare for me after that.  Yeah, ITF, such an organization, they cannot have a mistake in their whole system.  They blame me.  It was my mistake.  That was the deal...

39 comments:

  1. That interview is exasperating ..... Not just the sycophantic journo questions, but Troicki still trying to blame the ITF, as if they had henchmen pinning him down, and preventing him from giving blood.

    He refused to be tested, and was sanctioned. End-of story. He's lucky that it wasn't 2 years.

    Q. Did you lose any sponsors over it?
    VIKTOR TROICKI: Oh, yeah, I did.

    Good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 'Deep in myself I know that I didn't do anything wrong'.

      How deep does an innocent need to go to know he did nothing wrong? Not very deep at all really. You know.

      Depth takes you into denial, where lying can be reconciled as truth.

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  2. I´m not a doctor, so I´m asking for some help to know if it´s possible to have no scars after a appendix surgery, like this:

    https://rafaelnadalfans.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/2015-australian-open-day-3-20150121-123453-510.jpg?w=700&h=&crop=1

    After watching today´s episode during Nadal match., I feel myself again inmmersed in this dynamic of suspicion in wich we´re involved long time ago in this website, so I would really appreciate your comments on this matter.

    Many thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The procedure would have been laproscopic, so the scars should look like Image 7 here http://imgarcade.com/1/laparoscopic-appendectomy-scar/

      In the photo you posted, you can actually see the small scar / puncture site under his right ribacge if you look carefully, the one at his umbilicus is likely not visible due to it's location, and the third is presumably below the waist band of his shorts. I think this is legit, to be honest.

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  3. The presence of scars doesn´t prove anything. At this stage, I would only believe if I had been in the operating room.

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  4. Anything that causes young, healthy, athletes to have their hearts suddenly stop? Certainly not doping, because, this is tennis....

    http://nypost.com/2015/01/21/russian-tennis-star-dies-at-23/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Same thing happened with Mathieu Montcourt - 24 year old French player.

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    2. A 23 year-old who has barely scrapped inside the top 1000 would be doping? I'm mean it's possible, but surely she would have been better advised spending her money elsewhere. Like buying some coaching.

      I've no doubt that the strength, speed, recovery etc. that doping offers can make a significant difference to a top 200 player. Most players at that level are technically sound, so it comes down to fine margins and investing in PEDs is just logical. But once you are down to 1000, players are either very young or have rather greater playing drawbacks than being a step slow or a serve that is a bit powderpuff.

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    3. So getting some EPO in Russia would cost about $200. And you are going to buy some coaching for that? I guess I should move to Russia and hire a coach there.

      Doping costs a lot less than you think. Even in the US, a male can dope with testosterone and EPO for about $3000 per year. Females use anavar and epo -- for a little less. If you want to use xenon rather than epo -- you can do it for less than $2000. Outside the registered testing pool, you don't really need to get sophisticated with it. You can work your timing out performing some private doping test -- these cost $69 per test, so you figure to window when you have to be clean prior to a match where you might get tested.

      Maybe you can provide a list of coaches who will work for a year for $2000? So people don't have to resort to doping -- you'd be providing a public benefit.

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    4. @ Janik
      Of course a 23-year old journeywoman player would turn to doping if she thought it would help her career. Sure she may have had a heart problem or other health issues, but you can't discount the notion that she might have been doping. Hopefully an autopsy can clear things up.

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    5. I didn't discount that possiblity. Go back and read my response again and I'm sure you will see that.

      But there are all sorts of things a 23-year old journeywoman can do to help her career. Like learning not to put as many shots in the net or out. If people are pushing PEDs at players at that level, convincing them that their playing issues can be solved with chemical assistance, it strikes me that this advice is at best misplaced or motivated by something other than the players best interests.


      Cycling was (and quite possibly still is) riddled with doping. And yet riders still made it to the top level, the back end of the Tour de France fields, clean. It was only once they were in to elite company that they realised the front of the peleton was only achieveable by doping. Tyler Hamilton's 1000 days thing.
      A World no.1000 in Tennis is on a different planet from elite company.

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  5. The UCI has suspended it's OWN doctor and scientific adviser,Dr. Mario Zorzoli, over corruption allegations arising from a USADA investigation into doping by the Rabobank cycing team! Another result for Travis Tygart et al.

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/uci-suspends-zorzoli-from-anti-doping-work

    http://velonews.competitor.com/2015/01/news/testimony-sheds-light-leinders-rabobanks-systematic-doping_359008


    Thank goodness tennis only has good and honest people, and all the bad apples are in other sports!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I think we might be witnessing a clean Nadal for the first time in a long time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. no he is not
      if he got 3rd set he would have won in 5

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    2. I don't think Nadal is clean. I don't think he was back on his regular doping routine but I have a tough time thinking he's totally clean.

      I think Berdych just played out of his mind those first two sets and had one of those in-the-zone days. Also I agree with Alex - if Nadal had won the third set I think Berdych would have crumbled and Nadal would have won in five. Berdych was starting to get real shaky in the third and choked a couple of leads.

      Nadal still made it to the quarters after a long layoff and playing subpar tennis. Imagine him being back on his regular doping routine.

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    3. But he almost lost to Smyczek, a qualifier. He was just lucky Smyczek cracked under pressure or he would have been gone in the 2nd round. Maybe he isn't totally clean but I'm wondering if maybe he's had a health scare and been told to limit the crap he puts in his body. Maybe the appendicitis was something else. I guess the clay season will tell all. Funny thing is the guy manages to stay in the top four based on one surface really. If it weren't for the clay he wouldn't even be in the top 50. The guy did not look right in that loss to Berdych. He didn't even sweat which is so out of the norm for him.

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    4. Steve Tignor, a.k.a. a "Rafa" fanboy, chimes in: http://www.tennis.com/pro-game/2015/01/what-if/53846/

      P.S. He, like every ESPN analyst save maybe Darren Cahill, imagines, suggests potential injuries for Nadal every time he loses. Why must they do it all the time? I don't recall them doing it quite as much for a guy like Federer for instance.

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    5. "If it weren't for the clay he wouldn't even be in the top 50."

      Seeing as this is publically available info, I thought I would check. Discount Nadal's clay court results completely and he would have finished 2014 ranked... 12th.


      As for the suggestion that he wasn't doping in this event, I ask what would his motivation be for changing? It's not like he would feel the testing regime is suddenly breathing down his neck, is it?

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    6. I mean in the grand scheme of things. If it weren't for the clay there wouldn't be that aura about him (9 French Opens and counting) and more players would have the belief they could beat him. So I stand by what I say...he wouldn't even be in the top 50.

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    7. "So I stand by what I say...he wouldn't even be in the top 50."

      Go be mentally retarded elsewhere.

      Delete
  7. Nadal looked fine til this match. Just played poorly against someone playing well with good tactics.

    However. .given his recent trend of collapsing after the FO
    .kind of makes you wonder if the bio passport is having an effect.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It may well be. On the other hand, I'm watching Nishikori vs Wawrinka, doping possibilities aside, this is wonderful skill from both players. Levels above Nadal.

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    2. These two are head and shoulders above Nadal in the skill department. When he wins it's due to brute force.

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    3. Agreed. The Nishikori-Wawrinka match was very very good. It depresses me that I am cynical that they are clean because I would much rather a Wawrinka-Nishikori have multiple Slams rather than Nadal or Djokovic.

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  8. Have you watched Wawrinka all year? I have watched him in Abu Dhabi this year and all matches in AO. He was terribly lethargic at Abu Dhabi, bordering on unprofessional, due to his lack of interest. Sure it's an exhibition but the other guys always treat it professionally. Wawrinka's not usually like this so I was confused.

    I soon found out he was having an issue with his right elbow. I also figured his body was beatup from last year and he just rested in December and didn't prepare much to start the year.

    Sure enough, he's been sluggish the whole Aussie Open. Luckily he had a very favorable draw beating people he could beat in his sleep. His serve speeds were way down -ALL YEAR.

    Now he plays Nishikori and he's serving HUGE and playing with a whole new energy. Of course they showed him changing his medicine patch he uses on his elbow.. is there anything else I wonder?

    I am no expert in medicine and drugs, but I can tell when there are ridiculous inconsistencies and irregularities in the sport because I watch TONS of tennis. And I remember everything. AND I watch things out of order. For example I am still watching Murray Dimitrov. I was watching Venus/Radwanska while watching Venus/Keys. Easy to see Venus struggling from her disease vs Keys - looked much worse - especially if watching side by side - easy to see.

    Anyway - Serena is now Serena1 (first week) and Serena2 (2nd wk) at slams. Been going on for a while, along with sicknesses at any minor tournaments in between. So obvious she's screwing around with her body. Besides the fact that she looks much more like a man than before the foot injury. Just compare videos and pictures. I never thought the Willams' doped. Still don't think Venus does except for what she needs for disease. But Serena has definitely changed.

    As for Stan - I'm re watching some of it now - RIDICULOUS - not just serve. Suddenly he's a MONSTER again in movement, serve and more than anything CONFIDENCE&ENERGY. So the whole year he is lethargic and cant serve and now , as the commentator just said, "WAWRINKA AT HIS VERY BEST!". cmon - wake up people. This is not normal human body nor mind functions. Things take time - not up and down. Like Serena crushing everyone this week and then passing out and being carried off the court in her next event - unless it's the big one in Miami - which then is debatable whether she will be juiced.

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  9. Oh - and let me clarify - I DON'T KNOW FOR SURE - none of us do unless we are on the "inside". But there has got to be questions on the extreme irregularities. And for the "STARS" to get by with a "I don't have to answer that" is nonsense. Especially in light of the whole Cycling debacle. Which btw, is far more than just Lance Armstrong. He was basically set up like a patsy to hide the much bigger problem in all sport!

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  10. Wawrinka serving for 2nd set down 15-40 as Nish trying to break back. 138mph serve, followed by a couple more in the 130s , one at 124 and the last one was only 114 but followed up by big heavy fhs pushing Nish back to the point that in futility he hit a weak groundie into the net. Wawrinka pumping his fist acting like a maniac. Showing more energy than the rest of the year combined. In his last match he could barely get to 190 kph(118). Now he's consistently in the 120s and 130s mph?? His groundstrokes and movement are way more powerful as well.

    Early break to start the 3rd set for Nishikori. Wawrinka's energy level dipped. Ok ,that's normal. Next game he's ferocious again. Ridiculous bhs and passing shots. Nishinkori is putting his head down like "this is ridiculous". Stan is getting his revenge. Congrats.

    Stan was terrible disinterested in Abu Dhabi. Won Chennai, again, against Challenger competition where his serve speed and energy was average.

    Got to Qtrfinal of AO with a fortuitous draw with again average serve speed and energy.

    Now is a MONSTER in a revenge match. Emotion? Great strategy to conserve energy and play average all year until this moment then just suddenly turn it on and play perfect? maybe. or maybe something else...

    ReplyDelete
  11. I will say this for Wawrinka. He didn't serve like a monster all the match. There were lulls where he was serving like the rest of his year so far. 160s-180s kph first serve. But there were alot more 190s-200s and way too many huge serves as compared to the rest of the year.

    He also got nervous at the end and almost didn't seal the 3rd set. We all know that doping helps mentally as much as physically. Getting nervous at the end is typical of Stan and most players.

    I never thought he was a doper before. Even his rise last year I attributed to his continuing work on fitness, strategy and also the new balls at the AO last year. They are much more Power Friendly - ironically they have less compressed air - deader -- but at the same time they are lighter, a tighter felt and more resilient rubber - all factors to keep the balls flying through the air better and bouncing lower.

    If Stan had been playing well all year ...or even this past week .... I wouldn't say anything... but...

    Does anyone else know anything about him?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is possible that he dopes. It is possible that anyone in the top 10 dopes to be honest, considering that if Petr Korda did, the system isn't made to catch them.

      Wawrinka is a very skilled player, and a much better shotmaker than, say, Nadal but he could well be doping. I wouldn't put it past him. Doping patterns in players could vary depending on their priorities for the season and generally, in life.

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    2. I have to agree with Beacon Tripper. It is not out of the realm of possibility that all Top Tenners (or even Top 50 - both tours) are doping.

      Wawrinka has always been very talented but was a mental midget. If his newfound confidence (and results) over the past couple of years is a result of simply pulling himself together or doping, we will probably never know.

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    3. Wawrinka's average and top service speed in the AO:
      Round 1: 101mph, 134mph.
      Round 2: 100mph, 131mph.
      Round 3: 105mph, 134mph.
      Round 4: 105mph, 133mph.
      QF: 108mph, 138mph.
      SF: 106mph, 131mph.

      A bit of an increase against Nishikori, but nothing I would consider suspicious in terms of doping. I think Stan's improvement is more mental than chemical.

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    4. You have to look at Avg 1st Serve speed - don't care about 2nd - completely different mentality and physicality on the 2nd. Also I took from Radar Gun on cut - QF Top = 141. I did a detailed breakdown for another service including a breakdown by set and game. The meat of serving is usually after the start and only during crucial times. Once Wawrinka was up 2 sets on Nish he slowed down until he needed to finish. Taking all this into account there was a big difference as compared to other matches.

      Besides this the footwork and energy was MUCH better vs Nish. Nishikori played much better than his other opponents including Novak who really wasn't prepared for the rallies after Muller and Raonic. Just on energy alone Wawrinka looked like he was shot out of a cannon vs Nishikori.

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    5. All those stats are from the AO app so I'd take them as legit. Second serve should also be included IMO to give a fully rounded profile of how they're serving. Otherwise it's like you're picking and choosing stats to support your theories. TBH I think players should be allowed to have peaks and troughs of energy in a tournament without always being accused of doping. It's like nobody can ever play well without being on something.

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  12. Murray looking like he never had back surgery

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    Replies
    1. Yes, at long last. Its been a 15/16 month recovery but now he's playing somewhere near the level his talent justifies...

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    2. ... and his doping programme permits.

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    3. All I can say is if Murray is doping he is pretty rubbish at it. Had back surgery in Nov 2013, struggled for most of last season, only winning a few diddy tournaments at the end, which so knocked him out he was almost double bagelled by the elder statesman Federer at the WTF. As the AO this year showed he is still getting completely knackered at the end of long sequences of matches. Compare and contrast with Nadal's return from "injury".

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