Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Wayne Odesnik: Suspended from participation for a period of 15 years

18 Mar 2015

Decision in the case of Wayne Odesnik


PRESS RELEASE
18 March 2015 – London, ENGLAND - The Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (the “Programme”) and the United States Anti-Doping Agency (“USADA”) jointly announced today that Wayne Odesnik has committed a second Anti-Doping Rule Violation. 
Mr Odesnik, a 29-year-old player from the USA, provided an out-of-competition urine sample to USADA on 14 December 2014, and further samples to the ITF (on behalf of the Programme) on 17 December 2014 and 12 January 2015. Those samples were sent to WADA-accredited laboratories in Salt Lake City, USA and Montreal, Canada for analysis, and were found to contain one or more of: metabolites of methenolone; metabolites of androst-(2,3)-en-17-one; and GHRP-6. All are Prohibited Substances under the 2014 and 2015 WADA List of Prohibited Substances: methenolone under section S1 (Anabolic agents); androst-(2,3)-en-17-one under section S4 (Hormone and metabolic  modulators); and GHRP-6 under Section 2  (Peptide hormones, growth factors, related substances and mimetics). They are therefore also prohibited under the 2014 and 2015 versions of the Programme. Accordingly, Mr Odesnik was charged with an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Programme. 
Mr Odesnik’s commission of an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Programme was confirmed, which was his second such violation, having been sanctioned in 2010 for the possession of human growth hormone. It was, therefore, determined that he is suspended from participation for a period of 15 years, back-dated to commence from 30 January 2015, and so ending at midnight on 29 January 2030. It was also determined that Mr Odesnik’s results at the Happy Valley Challenger event, Australian Open and Maui Challenger event should be disqualified, with forfeiture of the ranking points and prize money that he won at those events. 
This case featured extensive cooperation between the ITF (on behalf of the Programme) and USADA, including information sharing, use of the expertise of each organisation and a consolidated approach to the results management process. These contributions are hereby recognised and held up as an example of the benefits of cooperation between Anti-Doping Organisations. 
The Tennis Anti-Doping Programme is a comprehensive and internationally recognised drug-testing programme that applies to all players competing at Grand Slam tournaments and events sanctioned by the ITF, ATP and WTA. Players are tested for substances prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency and, upon a finding that an Anti-Doping Rule Violation has been committed, sanctions are imposed in accordance with the requirements of the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme and World Anti-Doping Code. More background information on the Programme, sanctions, tennis statistics and related information can be found at www.itftennis.com/antidoping
USADA is a signatory to the World Anti-Doping Code and fully complies with the World Anti-Doping Code’s International Standards. USADA runs the anti-doping program including education, sample collection, results management, and drug reference resources for athletes in US Olympic, Paralympic, Pan American, and Parapan American Sport, including all Olympic sport national governing bodies, their athletes, and events throughout the year. Additionally, USADA’s commitment to clean competition and the integrity of competition also includes programs aimed at scientific research and education & outreach initiatives focused on awareness and prevention.

Read more at http://www.itftennis.com/news/202429.aspx#7jbUPpyAFBlpUXPU.99

19 comments:

  1. It's about time... Maybe the fact that he was running dope for other players through Biogenesis can now be examined. And who were those he allegedly named the first time he was suspended to get off? I still contend that he got his first suspension lifted by threatening to reveal other players involved and now that he is banned, maybe he will finally give it up.

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  2. At last!
    ITF kept the deal private but Austrian newspaper Kurier reported that Odesnik's first suspension was reduced because of reports he made against Daniel Koellerer about match-fixing.

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    2. I always felt this was a throwaway excuse. It came long after his suspension, Koellerer was an easy target and they needed to come up with something to justify pulling Odesnik's suspension. You have a doper and a fixer and you let the doper back in to nab the fixer? That doesn't make sense (especially since Odesnik is also supposedly a fixer). This was a "round up the usual suspects" ploy. Odesnik must have been aware of many other dopers and he never implicated anyone else, yet he continued to play even AFTER his name was linked to Biogenesis.

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  3. Remember when Odesnik cut a deal and got a shorter suspension for naming names? Remember when Mr Luray was mad about it and called him a rat? LOL.

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  4. Why is this idiot taking all this stuff??
    He is a journey man, not winning anything, but should save his money for travelling and hotels instead of expensive drugs.

    But very interesting what WADA can find in urine samples...
    Or maybe Odesnik didn't care anymore and took too much deliberately, because he wants to become the Heisenberg of tennis now.. lol

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    1. "Why is this idiot taking all this stuff??
      He is a journey man, not winning anything"

      Various possiblities;
      i) He needs to dope just to reach the level of journeyman,
      ii) Everyone around him is doping so he has to as well, he is just so dumb/sloppy that he keeps being caught at it,
      iii) Doping doesn't actually help significantly for Tennis. But some think it will, so can't do without.

      You pays your money and you takes your choice. Around these parts one of the options above is going to attract much more support than the other two.

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  5. So he fixed, doped and was a snitch. Pretty similar to everyone else on tour, except on the snitch part.

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  6. Is Mr. Cilic next up? Or any of the actual top pros making miraculous recoveries with endless endurance and strength?

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  7. It's about damned time. He should have received a harsher sentence the first time around. No shocker he tested positive again. Wonder what his buddy Djokovic will say?

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    1. "Wonder what his buddy Djokovic will say?"

      Not a damn thing that I can see and Nadal has been typically evasive claiming he doesn't know Odesnik and hasn't read about the situation, but, “obviously when that happens twice, you don't deserve to be on the tour.”

      http://www.tennis.com/pro-game/2015/03/roddick-rips-odesnik-players-react-latest-doping-ban/54382/#.VQrw2ktarwI

      Meanwhile other players are confident enough to be more outspoken:

      Roger Federer (in the same article) said, “It’s good you catch guys who don't do things they shouldn't be doing. Players and athletes should know if they cheat, they get caught. That's the moral of the story here. I didn't know him at all, personally. But I'm all for a clean sport, and that's why you've got to catch those guys who don't do the things they are supposed to be doing.”

      While Andy Murray was among the fastest to comment writing on twitter. "Bye bye Wayne... Good riddance."

      And in another article Murray appears to be even suggesting a cover up by someone somewhere - "After what happened the last time, whatever story you believe, the one that was given, I don't believe at all..."

      http://espn.go.com/tennis/story/_/id/12507559/wayne-odesnik-banned-15-years-second-doping-violation

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    2. Why doesn;t Murray speak out against dopers closer to home, dopers that actually do threaten his ranking?

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  8. Good riddance, obviously..

    But, seriously, how dumb is Odesnik to get caught This will make the uninformed believe that all dopers in tennis get found out, and everyone testing negative is clean as a whistle.

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  10. The ITF declined to use its investigatory powers in 2013 after the Biogenesis bust when Odesnik's name was plastered all over documents removed from the clinic. They need to answer the question why they didn't open a doping case against Odesnik at the time. They did exactly the same in the TennisVal case when they had cause to open cases against Errani, Ferrer and others known to have associated with Del Moral. Safina even refers to the 'recovery treatments' that Del Moral prescribed for her. What the ITF did was simply fire off a warning letter rather than pounce and catch the dopers red handed. All of which goes to show just how disinterested they are in exposing dopers.

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    1. Don't forget the ITF's handling of the Fuentes case. Remember, Fuentes claimed that he doped tennis players.
      The Spanish authorities then claimed "we are not INVESTIGATING tennis players". Not that there were no tennis players using Fuentes services.
      That non-denial, denial was good enough excuse for the ITF to DO NOTHING.
      Only a fool, at this point, would believe that the ITF, actually WANTS to catch the DOPING CHEATS.

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  11. Now Odesnik needs to write a tell-all book. But I guess without proof anything he says would find him fighting lawsuits for the rest of his life. No one's going to believe a pariah like him.

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  12. What annoys me is everyone will believe this means the ITF are doing a good job, when they were lucky the first time and only caught him the second time, as he was the only one they were chasing. I thought second offences usually meant life, but no doubt they'll cut it short again for agreeing to keep quiet on doping.

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