Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Dear Jon: Something to ask the ITF

86 comments:

  1. THASP (and crew): Why not ask Jon directly? Your last post, about Jon's mailbag, seems to show that he's looking for a safe, non-accusatory way of raising this very issue. So if he gets a volley of emails from THASPers, maybe he'll respond. Maybe not, but seems worth a shot.

    The only email I could find was generic: sportsillustrated_contactus@timeinc.com

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  2. Surely any move by the ITF to retest samples would conflict with its long-established policy of dealing with impropriety by turning a blind eye.

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  4. The WADA code changed in 2015, lengthening sample storage duration (and increasing the statute of limitations for anti-doping offences) from 8 to 10 years.

    In that light, I'm surprised that IAAF samples collected in 2005 weren't destroyed in 2013 (when the 8 year rule still applied)......

    The 2005 World Championships ran from August 6th -14th....For the 2005 WC athletes in question, an official infraction notice must have been issued either before the 6th of this month, or before the date of their sample collection that week in 2005! This literally was the last chance to sanction them...

    It would be amazing if all 'almost' 10 year old samples, across all sports, were tested for everything.... That would give the cheats pause for thought......

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  5. Michael Ashenden, one of the sports scientists who analyzed the leaked IAAF blood data (and who was snidely referred to as a "so-called' expert by Coe), responds with a powerful rebuttal.

    Good read.

    http://www.twitlonger.com/show/n_1sn8dnp

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  6. BIG NEWS to be coming soon regarding an athlete that has been caught up in the recent IAAF doping scandal. It has been described as "faith-shattering" Any guesses? Paula Radcliffe has been very quite on Twitter since the scandal broke out 10 days ago.

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    1. Any news on this then? Paula Radcliffe is not quite faith shattering, but Mo Farah or Brad Wiggins, two obvious dopers, would be to the English public.

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    2. I don't see how Mo Farah and Brad Wiggins would be faith shattering. Paula is the women's world marathon record holder, by a long shot. The one who fights for clean sport, the one who held a sign at a meet declaring "EPO Cheats Out." Mo has at least released his blood values (can still be doping of course) But Paula has been silent this whole time. Nothing from her. That to me is pretty big, a staunch fighter agains doping, adamant about re-testing samples, nowhere to be found during the IAAF scandal. IMO. Supposedly she took out a super injunction against the British press. Maybe that's what is holding all this up. We shall see.

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    3. Is this the David Nichols tweet? alot of people are throwing around bolt. But you know the skeptic in me is really saying who would i be really surprised at...got nothing.
      Apparently this athlete has a super injunction in place but the media are giving hint's...David Nichols tweet might have hints in itself, a couple of well placed prompts such as Brace yourselves and faith shattering. Could be something, could be nothing?

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    4. Yes, it is about the David Nichol's tweet, but other writers have chimed in as well, way before his tweet. Bolt would faith shattering as well (but not surprising for a 100m runner). All the clues have been pointing to a famous British athlete, notable for being against doping, amongst other clues. The dates line up as well. This athlete is also retired. The suspense is killing me.

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    6. Bolt would be a massive story, but that 'revelation' wouldn't rock any right-minded persons "faith" in anything lol. It's not him, unfortunately.

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    7. Carlos - What did you mean when you said that an athlete can "take out an injunction against the press"? I've never heard of anything like that.

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    8. Rick. As I understand it, the british have much more stricter libel laws (than the U.S). A super injunction is used to prevent the publication (in this case, of Paula Radcliffe's Blood values). A super injunction also prevents the reporting than an injunction exists at all, in this case, someone must have leaked it. Which is one reason that Mo Farah was probably not mentioned in the Panorama expose, and to some extent, why the British press are not writing about Chris Froome's TDF performance. Libel laws are very strict.

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    9. Radcliffe's brief twitter silence was broken yesterday with a number of re-tweets about Seb Coe being elected IAAF President. And one opinion of her own "Thank the lord".
      One could say that she has a prominent shield in Coe, who is a long standing part of the Athletics establishment that is currently under question. He would have no interest in a heroine of British Athletics being exposed. He said the German relegations were 'An attack on our sport', or something similar. And he also was publically willing to identify himself as a friend of Alberto Salazar after the allegations against him and Rupp came out. And go on to lavish praise on Salazar as a coach. Without, in good politician style, actually dismissing the allegations directly. But then, he is a global advisor for Nike...

      However it gets a little ambiguous in one of the first measures that Coe has announced is the establishment of a body independent to the IAAF to run its anti-doping programme. An acknowledgement of the significant conflict of interest in having the promoters policing is a distinct rarity. And this isn't a response to the recent scandals, either. Setting up such an independent body was a long-standing campaign pledge of Coe's.

      Of course, Coe has also been a British politician. There is a trick used in British politics for making difficult subjects go away. You set up an ‘independent enquiry’ and then carefully staff it with people who are ‘reliable’. Reliable in the sense that they will understand the lie of the land.

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    10. ^ Well said. As Victor Conte said, it is not good for business. No wonder this "breaking news" hasn't really come out yet. It actually may not, but all there journalists know who this person is, they just can't officially name her. Very sad indeed.

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  7. "Forget the silky seduction of pro sport, it’s time we saw it for what it really is.......In an area where we pay to fund the creation and promotion of false gods, it’s about time the customer got real and realised that it’s a lie in the name of profit", writes Ewan MacKenna

    ‘This is your last chance. After this, there is no turning back. You take the blue pill – the story ends, you wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take the red pill – you stay in Wonderland and I show you how deep the rabbit hole goes.’
    Morpheus, The Matrix

    https://ewanmackenna.wordpress.com/2015/08/13/forget-the-silky-seduction-of-pro-sport-its-time-we-saw-it-for-what-it-is/

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    1. Awesome quote by Ewan! Creation & promotion of False Gods that we fund-----so true!!!

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    2. Just finished reading this article and the reference to the red/blue pill is so fitting to the attitude on doping in sport. It's getting a mixed reception though, the "blues" are staying deep in the sand and giving not being nice at all about having to peak their heads out. Ewan also did an article on Tennis which is good too.

      https://ewanmackenna.wordpress.com/2014/11/05/a-racket-with-no-net/

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  8. There is a mass trail by media and public opinion being waged against Nick Kyrgios at the moment, that is providing a great distraction from the real negative issues in tennis at the moment.

    Tennis is becoming an arena sheep following Goats.

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    1. The irony of it all is that they r trying to shut up impulsive loud mouths on court like Kyrios b/c he might just say something about players doping that the mike picks up. After all, he threw Nadal under the bus for taking way too much time & getting away with it. Why not say something like well Nadal or Djoker never get tested & juice all they want----unfair.... That's why they r taking him down. If they don't, then other young guns who r fed up with the level of unfairness b/w top players & everyone else will start mouthing off on court.
      Wouldn't it have been something of a win for this site if Kyrios had blurted about top players doping & getting away with it??!!!

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    2. The Media are having a frenzy and public opinion want the young lads career on a sliver platter. So operation distraction is complete...

      Another thing to this nobody seems to be concerned about....If Donna Vedic is Stan Warwinka's girlfriend wasn't she seventeen at the time the rumor mill started spinning about their affair, a rumor which Kyrgios seems to have validated. Aside from the fact a grown man was chasing after a teenager is a little weird, it's illegal in some of the countries on the tennis tour too...

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    3. Kyrgios deserves criticism for his comments. The use of women's sexuality as leverage to humiliate men is based on the notion that women are men's property and that our decisions about sex are some kind of currency. Who Donna Vekic sleeps with, if anyone, are her business. Kyrgios's belief that those facts belong to him is appalling, and deserving of condemnation. The existence of doping doesn't mean other bad behavior should be ignored.

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    4. I agree with mary. There is no excuse for what Kyrgios said about Vekic. He was pissed with Wawrinka and took it out on her - an innocent party.

      Kyrgios actually has some interesting things to say about tennis and doping, but due to outburst in Montreal and other temper issues he has, people will dismiss anything he says. KInd of like Rios, who when he played had a lot of issues with people he felt were doping (*cough* Agassi *cough*) but the media refused to listen to him because of his reputation as a jerk.

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  9. it is such a nice read: http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/revealed-secret-tests-expose-19-6179606

    They expose the cheats having witnesses, pictures etc. but nothing happens. That's just confirm how serious this business is about doping.

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  10. You say there are no journalists that risk their skin to write about dodgy things happening in tennis. And it is almost true.

    There are some kamikaze attempts like this one: http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/tennis/2012/10/18/is-tennis-doing-enough-on-doping/1639911/

    But nothing happens. People who care don't have the power and those who have the power or money they don't care or against theri interest. If they really wanted to make this sport clean there would be ways to do it. Anyone of us reading this forum would more likely to find abnormal performance than those that cash the money for not seeing it.

    The only clean sport may occur if there are no money prize and there is no big public for it.

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  12. Nearly choked when i read Serena William's latest post match interview on reaching the CM semi's in Toronto...

    "I don't feel like I'm at my best or anywhere near it," said Williams, who will go for the Grand Slam at the U.S. Open. "But I feel like I'm going in the right direction and I want to keep that up."
    ...Is anyone actually stupid enough to believe Serena isn't anywhere near her best? What is her best? Pounding the ball over the net with a forehand cross court then take to flight out of the stadium over toward Syria. Obliterate ISIS at one fell swoop with her racket then back to the stadium just as the ball comes over the net. send the ball down the line with a backhand shot... Game, Set, Match?

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  13. Now that is funny.I completely agree with you.Send Serena and Ronda Rousey to Syria.Can't do any worse.

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  14. "Shhh . . . yes, we athletes cheat
    With anonymity assured, up to 34% of competitors at the 2011 world championships told an independent survey they had doped — yet the governing body refuses to allow its publication."

    http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/news/uk_news/thedopingscandal/article1594288.ece?CMP=OTH-gnws-standard-2015_08_15

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  15. And so it goes...

    http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/aug/16/athletics-body-iaaf-accused-blocking-survey-revealing-widespread-doping

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  16. Just as the momentum looked to be slipping on the IAAF scandal, Hajo Seppelt has announced another follow up documentary on "doping in athletics" on August 16 (today 6PM CET) so keep an eye out on it. If i find a link, i'll post it.

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  17. Very strange Djockovic article on getting dizzy from someone smoking cannabis on court in Montreal....

    https://uk.sports.yahoo.com/news/esp-tennis-djokovic-left-dizzy-smell-cannabis-court-105534329--ten.html

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    1. Must not have been gluten-free pot!

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    2. Maybe they'll do an IC test and we'll find out...Lol

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  18. Not the documentary but an interesting follow up article on the aftermath - for the Russians at least...what about the rest i wonder?

    http://www.sportschau.de/doping/geheimsache-doping-106.html

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  19. ....and then there's this:

    http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/aug/16/leave-it-out-are-food-intolerances-fact-or-fad-gluten-dairy-free-from-coeliac

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  20. WADA President Craig Reedie skeptical about value of PEDs in racket sports....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9j1eEfX-mxQ

    No wonder his organization only recommend testing 5% of samples for EPO-like agents and hGH-like agents.......

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    1. Oh wow and he's so dismissive on it too. So what does it take to change the "president" of the WADA mind...a few deaths or scathing third party investigation that will expose his agency to scrutiny again?

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    2. Reedie was elected because he would go easy on the sports federations (he is part of the cover-up).

      Bitti and others were unhappy with the previous leadership at WADA. They were VERY vocal about WADA being too tough on dopers.

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    3. Co-sign to what GoldenAgeOfDrugs said. WADA has been significantly watered down because the sports agencies fear the big names in their sports getting caught. They made sure their puppet Reedie got in over anyone else.

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  22. ARD documentary content continues to push the anti-doping agenda

    Worth watching.

    http://www.sportschau.de/doping/videogermanathletespublishbloodtestresults100.html

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  23. In an interview today, Paula Radcliffe says she disagrees with athletes, such as Pavey and Farah, making their blood data public. Quelle fackin' suprise:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/athletics/33990503

    I think, for many reasons, she'd be best off keeping quiet.

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  24. Watching Serena Williams first match in Ohio and noticed that she still has a large white plaster on the back of her left hand between the hand and the wrist. Does anyone know the reason for this? it's been there since the French Open and seems to be the kind of place you'd but an IV line.

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    1. I haven't seen a photo, but it could be kinesiotape, a physical therapy treatment for myofascial pain that prevents muscles from cramping or spasming by stretching them slightly. Totally benign. Plus, it's not likely that she'd have an IV port or site displayed so prominently (if so, the tape wouldn't be white!).

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    2. She claims she hurt her hand against Vinci in Toronto.

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  25. "Paula says she won't be releasing her blood values" D-O-P-E-R! It is her, the British athlete with the off scores. Suddenly, she doesn't want HER scores to be released.

    http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/athletics/33990503

    "The key point is you can't prove you are clean," she said. "We don't have a foolproof, 100% testing programme in place right now so we can't prove that. In some sense, what Wada are trying to say is we don't want this data out there in the public domain because people don't understand it, it is very complicated."

    Paula we get it. You were doping.

    http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/61808000/jpg/_61808558_radcliffe_epo2_640.jpg

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  26. Wow, looks like it may be Paula as the one who told the media she'd sue then if her results got out. And they wouldn't get the money back 'like with lance Armstrong'. No wonder she has been deafeningly silent!

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    1. And she still has her defenders! Unbelievable. She also tried to come up with some BS excuse for being silent. She was trying to figure out twitter in China. Total BS because she was training in the Pyrenees (a week or so?) and other athletes who were training at Font Romeu, were tweeting several times a day. She was even in a couple pictures!

      https://twitter.com/alydixon262/status/631169057534906368

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    2. And the way she talks about how it's 'important to remember' that abnormal blood results are not proof of doping but rather an indication that you need to target test in the future, is setting herself up for when her alarming results one day get out, so she can say 'I've said all along, this is no proof of doping!'

      A bit like Djokovic with his strangley random 'what if somebody messes with my test samples one day' comment after his good mate Troiki refused to take a blood test. Pointless comment but something he can point to should he ever test positive one day.

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    3. "Be careful how you treat others on your way to the top, because you will never know who your are going to meet again on your way back down"

      Sort of puts an image in my head of those athletes Radcliffe condemned as drug cheats and the "EPO Cheat out!" placard her supporters use to wave.
      So the next time Paula draws comparisons on Lance Armstrong she should remember one of his mistakes was was pissing people off and they had no hesitation in getting revenue when giving the chance...

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    5. Her over-the-top behavior is only further proof in my mind that she doped. She sounds utterly terrified to have her results released. If she is as anti-doping as she has claimed, she should be open to more scrutiny of athletes' doping results and more transparency.

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  27. "Bolt saddened by doping focus"....

    http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/athletics/34001275

    "All I've been hearing is doping, doping, doping," said Bolt. "All the questions have been about doping." and says he "cannot save the sport's reputation on his own...."

    You couldn't make it up.


    Focus is obviously on athletics atm, but tennis' day will come (I hope).......

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    1. Track and field is rife with doping, maybe more than any other sport. He should know that better than anyone else. Of course there is going to be speculation about any success in track and field. He's an idiot if he thinks any doping speculation is going to go away, especially since Justin "Two Strikes" Gatlin is back running and putting up ridiculous times (yet claims he isn't doping).

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  28. This is a really excellent article summarizing why the various anti-doping strategies are ineffective.
    It should be compulsory reading for all the folks that think negative testing means clean sport.
    http://t.co/0UgVBHlVE0

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    1. The article overlooks serious problems with its own argument. It says "testing isn't perfect." Ok, sure. But then it talks about the CIR test and says that it does work better, but simply costs more. Well, is cost a problem? If cost is a problem, then why is that? There are billions of dollars in sports. Who is responsible for allocating the money? And is the real reason that dopers aren't caught really caused by the people allocating the money? If so, new tests will never solve the problem.

      Same thing with the biomarker test. The author wants us to believe that a very good test for HGH exists but "the kits aren't always available." Really? Why are the kits not available?

      There is already a very effective method of catching dopers -- it is called testing. When truly "intelligent" out-of-competition testing is done, it is extremely difficult to dope. When athletes get 2 -3 "free passes" each and every year, and they are only called upon 2-3 times a year, it is ridiculous to talk about "micro dosing" or "smart drugs." Better to talk about stupid testers, willfully ignorant authorities, and duplicitous sports organizations.

      Rather than simply throwing up their hands, these journalist should say, "Hey, catching dopers isn't that hard." Even if they "micro dose," there is still a window. Pick some athletes, work out when they would be micro dosing, show up and take their blood and urine. Stop taking worthless samples -- yes, testing the champion of a tournament after the tournament is over is worthless and simply adds to the meaningless statistics cited by this author (only 1% of tests are positive -- yes, because 99% of the tests are stupid and a waste of time). Test athletes that train in bizarre locations. If an athlete misses a test, send a tester every day for a month.

      In terms of "investigations," even that could be dramatically improved. Simply offer a reward of $100,000 to any "kitchen chemist" who will identify an athlete he supplied drugs to. Up the offer to $1,000,000 for top athletes -- then see how many "kitchen chemists" will work in secret for athletes. Modify the code so that the guilty athlete has to pay the reward -- then it won't even cost a dime to implement.

      There are dozens of simple, cost effective ways to dramatically improve testing. While nothing will be 100% foolproof, it would at least eliminate the laughable state of affairs that exists now.

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    2. MTracy right on the money as usual.

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  29. I'm convinced the biological passport has an big and positiv effect on tennis. Just look at Nadal. All started at the end of 2013 when ITF said they are going to introduce it. 2014 he lost at AO. I know, the passport doesn't have an immidate effect, but just by announcing it, players might think more about it, they will lose confidence, their routine is off.

    2015 and still Nadal is losing to a lot of bad tennis players. Yesterday against a 34 year old *g*. He tried his last shot (literally) when he had this suspicious HGF/HGH treatment or what ever they called it. It clearly didn't work.

    Look at Djokovic. He seemed to be exhausted during that FO Final.
    Murray or Wawrinka would have beaten Nadal also. It wasn't down to Novak. In Rome Wawrinka played great against Nadal. And Nadal wasn't even bad on that night..... Also Djokovic is looking not as fit as in the past, when he could play two 5-hour matches within 3 days... Last year he struggled against Nishikori at the US-Open and also before this match. In Canada or Cincy now, he isn't really enjoying himself.


    Today Nadal's forehand is so off, it has vanished. He clearly lost more than a step. More than Federer who is what? 5 or six years older? He is saying he lost confidence, he was mentally always weak. That is no surprise when you have your uncle/coach doing more interviews than yourself....

    In women's tennis they just suck. Sorry to say that. Women's tennis is soooo weak. Serena
    will never have an Wimbledon 2014 or Panic room attack ever, ever again... Because there is no competition for her. She even has time to study medicine now LOL
    http://edition.cnn.com/2015/08/20/tennis/serena-williams-grand-slam-tennis/index.html



    Those who were doping heavily in the past will find of course new ways, like micro dosage. But the "good old times, dope until you drop dead, no one will catch you" are over.

    So this is good.

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    1. Something is definitely going wrong with Nadal - to slip so far in form and down the rankings at his age is getting suspicious. The cracks are showing especially seeing his hissy fit with Carlos Benardes in Rio over a time violation. Even going as far to insist the umpire not oversee any of his matches.

      On Djokovic's recent performance in Montreal. I'm not sure if this was genuine especially given his record with Murray. He's already seen the questions that are flying around about Serena's dominance of the women s game and he doesn't have the race card to throw at his haters. Of course don't forget that Odensik, Trokici are/were his besties.

      Yes the women's game is insufficient in a pro sport category at the moment...look at the top ten. Serena is rubbing her hands with glee at the moment, no wonder the stands are empty or half empty at the women s events.

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    3. I agree that we can observe some small improvement after introduction of biological passport but I would not exagerate its effects.
      Especially when we talk about 100% natural, Rafa.
      He has started taking steroids around 10 years ago and has undergone vaious treatments and it is absolutely posible that he cannot take as much as he did in the past.

      With regards to Djokovic I cannot see any effect the passport may have on him. He has lost only a couple of matches this season (Montreal was one of them). I can't believe he is clean and at the same time he doesn't seem to care about doping authorities and what they do. His dominance in sport is ridiculous and makes this sport so predictible that it becomes boring and disgusting after all.

      Biological passport is a joke for most of the players.

      MTracy (some post up) is right that it is all designed not to catch anyone. If they wanted they would clean the sport quickly - the matches would be quicker and rallies of 50 shots would be a history.

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    4. I am a long time fan of women's tennis but I have to agree with you Rota and Gmurph. Women's tennis is at the lowest point it's been in 20 years. It is an utterly terrible product right now. 99% of the women on the tour right now have the mental stamina of a moldy piece of bread riddled with holes.

      The ratings are nosediving (go see how ESPN will no longer cover the French Open and claimed that ratings were an issue) - the ratings for the French Open barely cracked a million for both finals and the Wimbledon finals were equally dismal - the women's final only had 1.4 million watching and the men barely cracked 2 million.

      That's not so bad, you say, but compare to the Women's College World Series - also on ESPN - where it's Game 3 beat out both Wimbledon finals with 2.3 million watchers. The U.S. Open might get decent ratings because of Serena going for the Slam, but that's the only reason, not because people love tennis.

      Nadal has fallen so fast and so far that it is pretty shocking. There's no guarantee he's making the second week of Slams anymore. Personally I just think Nadal's body is betraying him. But that's what happens when you dope for so long, your body is telling you enough.

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  30. Newly elected IAAF head-honcho Seb Coe has refused to give up the six-figure salary attached to his ambassadorial role with sportswear giant Nike.....

    No doping Nike athletes, right? No potential conflicts of interest, right? #justingatlin

    Pro-sports are a $mess.

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/othersports/article-3203804/Lord-Coe-not-six-figure-Nike-salary-elected-IAAF-president.html#ixzz3jV6EqHYS

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  31. This is an interesting analysis of how the average age of top tennis players is increasing year on year...... Over time, they are breaking through at a later age and playing till they are older. Many reasons for this, but in some cases its probably pharmacological

    https://cleaningthelines.wordpress.com/2015/08/21/43-the-concealed-effects-of-ageing-part-1/

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  32. For the die-hards.... Jeff Novitzky (who helped bring Armstrong down) talks to Joe Rogan about doping.... (UFC/MMA have employed Novitzky to supervise health in their athletes, so consider all statements in that context).

    Interview does contain some interesting insights, including comments about use of animal-derived testosterone (which might circumvent CIR testing), and process for TUEs for testosterone in elite athletics (which Novitzky claims is rare), mental burden for cheaters, overseas training to avoid detection, reasons young athletes make these choices, microdosing, and suspicions about Conte (lol),...

    Some comments were not well-informed, though......

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rR7IqzwgGeU

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  33. So Sir Craig has given Russia solace in the doping scandal. What is the point of WADA, if there going to play happy families and not police them?
    Out of curiosity I looked up WADA funding - their own webpage for funding is "Bad Gateway" (LOL) so i found out on Wikipedia "various governments of the world" contribute 50%. Does this mean i'm paying for Reedie to arse around and ignore an issue that's the basis of his employ..

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/article-3207651/WADA-president-Sir-Craig-Reedie-s-comfort-email-Russia-s-senior-drug-buster-reveals-toothless-clampdown-doping.html

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  34. Bolt beat Gatlin by one tenth of a second in the final in Beijing 9.79 to 9.80.At 33 Gatlin is running out of his mind.Now that is some fishy shit.

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    1. That would be one-hundredth of a second.

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    3. You are right.Check it out, awesome race.

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    4. A late stumble loses Gatlin time hey? not anything to do with a drug cheat winning would upsetting the apple-cart on the dawning of lord seb coe's rule.

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  35. Breaking newz folks: Just so you know, the 22nd is comingz in a few weeks.

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    1. Oh dear Eric Ed...we were thinking more 26 plus actually.
      Credit were credit is due couldn't even get a 1st serve in yesterday because of her elbow "trouble" now the serve was back in flying form against Halep less than 24 hrs later...what 13 or more aces? Wonder who her physio is, the last guy who was able to preform a miraculous healing like that was the son of god.

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  36. http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/08/18/us-tennis-men-cincinnati-idUSKCN0QN00L20150818

    I watched this match and Monfils looked not interested in wining it with Janowicz who I must say is not in top form. Not only he served quickly and made some double faults but generally one could sense that he didnt care. He played drop shots one after another although loosing points with them. I was really astonished to see that. The question is what the heck was happening.

    Was he not interested because it was not his day?
    He had no excuse not to play and was on something? US Open is close...
    Or was it the strategy to win the match?
    Or the tennis federation asked him to defeat because they have some catch on him?

    It would be very intersting to find this one out.

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    1. If it were anyone else I'd be questioning it, but it's Monfils who is the Clown Prince of the ATP Tour. He's the type of player who, if he doesn't want to be out there, will put in zero effort, collect his prize money and go home. Maybe something was up, but I think it was just Monfils being Monfils.

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    2. I know what you mean about Monfis being Monfis....

      That said, every cent earned by professional tennis players comes from the fans either directly or indirectly (via sponsors/endorsers/broadcasters). Audiences pay to see players try, not dial it in. In that respect tanking is disrespectful. It's right, IMO, that the tours are clamping down on it.

      Pro-sports exist as consumable entertainment products. If audiences don't believe in the product (either through doping or tanking), they won't consume, and the money will dry up. Federations and players need to understand this.

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    3. You must be right. I have not seen him doing it before. I remember how he fell on the court trying to return some ball from Berdych this season. That was a different man, ready to show more tricks.
      He could have won this match with Janowicz if he had a different mood/approach.

      Cincinnati was not within his priorities - which may seem strange but if it is a winning strategy I would go for it. I am courious how he plays at US Open.

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    4. @arcus: I agree with everything you said. It sucks and I think tanking should be penalized more in terms of fines.

      Monfils is a mood player - if he is "on", he makes wacky shots and tries to entertain the crowd. But when he feels "off" he puts in the most minimal effort possible. He's a crowd player - if he has a disinterested or small crowd then he doesn't play as well. It's just he way he is - it sucks for people who want to see him play and perform but he is very much a mood player. I wouldn't be surprised if Monfils did really tank.

      Kyrgios clearly tanked at Wimbledon this year and didn't get fined The ATP and ITF simply aren't consistent when it comes to enforcing the tanking rules as they should be.

      @Grzegorz Gajowki:
      Knowing Monfils, he'll do well at the U.S. Open. He loves the big crowds and bright lights and likes to put on a show for people. He does have QF points to defend from last year where he really should have beaten Federer there.

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    5. Paid to lose possibly. You can never tell.

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