Sunday, October 18, 2015

USADA Q3 Testing: Not much

Very little testing by the USADA in Q3 of 2015...or does it mean that there were a lot of missed tests?

4 Athletes Selected
6 Total Tests

Athlete Name
Test Count

Jean-Yves Aubone
1

Jamie Hampton
1

John Isner
2

Serena J Williams
2

Running total for 2015:

15 Athletes Selected
34 Total Tests

Athlete Name
Test Count

Jean-Yves Aubone
1

Michael C Bryan
2

Robert C Bryan
4

Lauren Davis
1

Jamie Hampton
3

John Isner
4

Steve Johnson
1

Madison Keys
2

Bethanie Mattek-Sands
1

Christina M McHale
1

Jack Sock
2

Sloane Stephens
1

Serena J Williams
5

Venus E Williams
5

Donald Young
1

97 comments:

  1. This is especially odd because the third quarter included most of the North American swing, when the players would have been more easily available for testing.

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  2. http://www.tennis.com/pro-game/2015/10/men-all-seasons/56630/#.ViUlbtaLVvM

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  3. Fuentes is back in business it seems (much like Ferrari)

    http://www.abc.es/deportes/20151015/abci-eufemiano-fuentes-201510142113.html [In spanish]

    "Anti-Doping Agency suspects the canary doctor convicted in Operation Puerto is still active in cycling and triathlon"


    I wonder if any Tennis players are still in contact with him.

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    Replies
    1. If they are, we're certainly not going to hear about it.

      In retrospect, what was amazing with all the players using Del Moral's services was how open they were using Lance Armstrong's doctor. After all, it wasn't exactly a secret Armstrong was doped to the eyeballs.

      Delete
  4. UK Anti-Doping threatened with budget cuts by UK government

    http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/athletics/34619576

    How can any government cut anti-doping funding?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is unusual for governments to cut funding to corrupt, under performing, mismanaged private "not for profit" agencies (with huge salaries for executives), but occasionally, it does happen.

      Delete
  5. http://www.tennisworldusa.org/Flavia-Pennetta-After-the-US-Open-Rafael-Nadal-and-Serena-Williams-called-me-articolo27324.html

    Does Omerta starts at young age?

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  6. Herman Ram (Head of Dutch ADO) and Dick Pound on why anti-doping efforts are not effective enough

    http://www.playthegame.org/news/news-articles/2015/0102_an-elephant-should-be-eaten-one-piece-at-a-time/

    Pound...... "all those who think that all international federations are code-compliant, please raise your hands because I have a bridge in Brooklyn that I’d like to try to sell you after this session"

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  7. More good sense from Pound.

    "The only way that international sport can be forced to change is to hit them in their wallets – hit them where it hurts”, he said. “Sponsors are involved because customers want them to be involved – don’t forget that”, he said. “Sponsors won’t stay where the customers don’t want them to stay"

    http://www.sportsintegrityinitiative.com/play-the-game-2015-sport-needs-to-show-why-it-is-still-fit-to-govern/

    The problem is that so many of the fans are happy to just keep drinking the Kool-Aid.

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  8. UK Government considering making doping a criminal offense.

    http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/34653817

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    Replies
    1. Yes, send all those diabetics to jail! How exactly would this work? If you take a cold medicine, you go to jail? Take those glucose tablets given to you by Clic's mom -- go to jail.

      In any case, the use of prescription drugs without a valid prescription is already illegal in the US -- and I am assuming in the UK as well. So, what exactly are they trying to accomplish?

      Delete
    2. I guess this is a reaction to the recent athletics doping scandals (where UK hero athletes were allegedly implicated), and a desire to look tough on doping, while news outlets suggest that they may be pulling the plug on UKAD budgets.

      On the plus side, I believe (if feasible) the potential for legal recrimination would be a more powerful deterrent than current sanctions. The Feds involvement certainly made the US Postal cyclists change their tune.

      On a related note, a successfully doping athlete steals earnings and reputation from their clean opponents. I'm surprised that there are so few (if any) civil law suits against sanctioned athletes to recover damages in this respect. Tennis would be the perfect show case. "You beat me, doped, in a GS final, and I'm suing you for prize money, bonuses and potential endorsements"

      If only......

      Delete
    3. I am not a big fan of criminalizing more things and as much as I think our current system of anti-doping enforcement is seriously lacking, putting dopers in jail isn't good for society. Maybe because I am an American, where our criminal justice system and the number of people in jail or convicted of crimes is off the charts, I think this is a terrible idea.

      Delete
    4. I also wonder who it is trying to "protect?" I mean, do we need to have the government help those poor destitute sporting leagues like the NFL and MLB police their ranks. The NFL only brings in $10 Billion dollars a year, so definitely, it needs more government subsidies to keep it going. In any case, the NFL players don't go to jail for beating their wives, so why put them there for doping?

      Delete
    5. I don't want to sound smart but are most of the list of banned substances illegal anyway and caught in possession of them is a prosecutable offense?

      The risk of drug use must outweigh the rewards otherwise illegal or not it will go on regardless. I agree with Pound on hitting the federations financially however expecting the public (who are just there for the entertainment) to care is too much of an ask. Substantial fines and even banning athletes from competing in international events for non compliant federations would resound right down the ranks and provide an example for the rest of them.

      I like the idea of a clean athlete suing the doper - risk v reward if this became a precedent would be clearer. on this, you have to ask yourself why would a clean athlete be willing to drag their behinds around the world to compete blood, sweat,tears against drug abusers for nought and do nothing about it? Will Wayne Odensik bring out a book and let us why a number 200 (and something) needs to dope?

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    6. MTracy i don't see why taxpayers should fund the perpetuation of a lie and help line the pockets of the shadow puppets that stand at the forefront of anti doping.

      Delete
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  10. Nadal almost pulls off the upset in the Basel final. That's as close as he has been to an indoor title in ten years. He has found the right 'formula' again. But none of the hacks will question how he does it, despite yet another of his curious cycles.

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    1. Don't forget the implications of what you just have said. A 34 year old Federer beat a "Nadal with the right formula again".

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  11. Maybe. But this is Federer's best surface and usually his best time of year. Given that and his ranking and how he has played over the year his performance at Basel was to be expected. So we only come back to his age. Nadal, on the other hand, has completely reversed the conspicuous decline in his game over the last year, playing almost as well as he ever has on his least favoured surface and without apparent explanation. Bar one.

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    1. "Maybe. But..."

      Denial.

      By the way, we all suspect Nadal is back on the juice. Considering 6 months from now he said he was getting more tired than usual, and now he outlasted his opoonents in all his last matches, we can all agree on that.To make progress, we need to stop the denial when talking about a certain Maestro.

      Delete
    2. A 'maybe' is not denial but recognition that there has been nothing like the same evidence as for others, namely Mr Nadal. You have to offer a little more than simply Federer's age - which of itself is not conclusive. Jimmy Connors played a grand slam semifinal at 39, Ken Rosewall was in a final at 41.

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    3. And we all know for certain that every player until Nadal showed up was clean.

      What a 'conclusive' evidence you got there...

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    4. So what kind of evidence are you depending on to suggest Connors and Rosewall were dopers? You will excuse me but I prefer evidence over assertion in order to make such a claim. Also, where did I maintain no-one doped till Nadal came along?

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    5. There is reasonable chance in my mind that Federer is doping, because there aren't many things on court right now that separate him and Djokovic. No extended breaks from tour, but Federer is playing almost as well as Djokovic, and his defense almost seems as good as his heyday (refer to Wimbledon semifinal against Murray). I'm convinced Djokovic dopes. Don't see why Federer should be any different.

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    6. They play nothing like the same game. That's one reason. If you think Federer's defense is anything like Djokovic's you haven't been watching their matches very closely. In fact, if they were equal in that department Federer would almost never lose to Djokovic because his attacking game is better than Djokovic's.

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    7. I'm sorry, but I have to disagree. Federer has more holes in his game that can be exploited because he has to run around the backhand so much to force the issue. And a fundamental difference in their defence is the fact that Federer has to resort to slicing on the backhand, whereas Djokovic has two hands.

      And the Federer's attack being better is a bit of a myth. He just hits more outright winners than Djokovic. Djokovic starts on the front foot in a majority of his points because of his return of serve; something Federer just doesn't have.

      Like I said, I just don't feel Federer's game alone is enough justification to say he isn't doping. It isn't so much less physical than other top players; and he is 34. Yes, the argument is circumstantial at best; but then the same applies to everyone else.

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    8. The circumstantial arguments don't apply equally to all. The respective merits or otherwise of Djokovic's and Federer's game do not obscure obvious differences, chiefly that Djokovic's game is considerably more physical than Federer's game ever has been - demonstrated especially by his greatly enhanced court coverage, stamina and defensive skills, far greater than any player has previously demonstrated, with the possible exception of Nadal - which Djokovic largely and dramatically achieved virtually overnight at the end of 2010. Federer is not and has never been the athlete Djokovic has become from 2011 on - who is? - and has certainly not become either stronger or more tireless since his prime years of 2004/7. None of this means Federer cannot have doped but if circumstantial evidence means anything - and that's all we have to go on - it suggests the argument must be rather weaker for Federer than for Djokovic or certain others. That is all.

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    9. That I agree with. Federer is less likely to be doping, but I cannot dismiss the notion of him doping entirely.

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    10. Fed is most likely dope especially nowadays.It migh not be enough to beat Novak Lancovic but thats a different story.

      Delete
  12. Of interest? http://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-who-found-evidence-for-gluten-sensitivity-have-now-shown-it-doesn-t-exist

    So, gluten sensitivity is an invention? Or an excuse?

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  13. FIFA gets tough on doping with (wait for it!)......... a poster.

    http://resources.fifa.com/mm/document/footballdevelopment/education/02/72/96/96/11rulestopreventdopinginfootball_poster.en_neutral.pdf

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  15. Serena Williams' coach says she has same knee issues as Rafael Nadal

    http://espn.go.com/tennis/story/_/id/14046269/serena-williams-coach-says-same-knee-issues-rafael-nadal

    Serena Williams is dealing with similar knee injuries to the ones that have affected the career of Rafael Nadal, her coach Patrick Mouratoglou said at the Paris Open on Tuesday.
    [...]
    "She has bone bruises, and if you keep on playing with this for too long, too much, the next step is a stress fracture."
    [...]
    "There was no other option, and we knew that at some point we had to do it, because she plays with pain all the time," Mouratoglou said. "The injury can get really worse, and at her age her career could really be in danger if she went too far and got more injured, like Rafa did in the past.

    "It's the same as Rafa," Mouratoglou said. "It's just playing for so many years, the cartilage is [almost] gone. Not all of it, but a big part, so the bones just hit themselves.

    ---

    She can always try PRP/Stem Cell treatments. They have worked wonders for Mr. Nadal over the years. She will be good as new!

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    1. Apart from the ridiculous claim that someone can play championship level tennis without knee cartilage (bone-on-bone would make walking difficult, let alone running), what most struck me about the Guardian's coverage of this same issue
      (http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/nov/04/serena-williams-depression-knee-coach-patrick-mouratoglou) is the photo showing Patrick and Serena standing right next to each other.

      They look quite similar in weight, even if Patrick is a bit taller. His website lists him at 80 kg (176 lbs), while Serena is listed everywhere on the web as 155 tops. That 155 figure never made sense to me, and this photo suggests that her true weight is at least 20 lbs higher, which raises the question once again of where all that musculature comes from (and why so many websites quote an obviously false weight).

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    2. In Serena's defense on that one...all women lie about their weight.

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    3. Do superheros have problems with their knees?.....
      http://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/sport/serena-williams-turns-superhero-when-some-idiot-tries-to-steal-her-phone-703998.html?utm_content=buffer47f77&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer.

      It all makes sense now, the disappearing into the panic room to change into her superhero persona to charge to help someone in distress not because of a random drug test....wow!!!

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    4. Now this piece is pure comedy gold. Thanks for the good laugh, G Murph.

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    5. Mary - Even if all (many, some) women lie about their weight, why should Wikipedia and ESPN and Sports Illustrated and the major sports media outlets go along with Serena's fib?

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    6. Only because they have no way of accurately judging her true weight since tennis players, unlike boxers, don't have public weigh-ins. I think tennis player weight is one of the area where the press is stuck with what the players say. Can you imagine the uproar if ESPN estimated Serena's weight higher and didn't do it for everyone. I agree that she looks heavier (she also goes up an down) but I don't think there is much a reporter can do.

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    7. You're right about the lack of tennis weigh-ins, but a case could be made that weight should be part of the biological passport (plus BMI and body fat index and etc.) given how directly steroid use can affect musculature and weight. Not holding my breath, though.

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  16. Nadal has never had surgery on his knees. His problems have been associated with tendinitis, not cartilage. Despite MTO's and a knee bandage, Nadal was running like Bolt at Basel. As he usually does. I wouldn't be worried for Serena if she has 'knee issues' like Rafa.

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  17. http://www.eurosport.co.uk/tennis/peugeot-become-official-car-supplier-of-the-atp-world-tour_sto4975937/story.shtml

    Is that Djokovic making sure ATP will keep him clean?
    Interesting visual as well, Djokovic umpiring Chris Kermode (the left one with the racket, grey suit, black tie)

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  18. Former IAAF chief, Lamine Diack, arrested by French police for allegedly accepting bribes to defer sanctions against Russian dopers.

    There is no reason to believe that international federations are intrinsically honest.

    http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/athletics/34721317

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    1. This is going to be one of the biggest doping scandals since Armstrong.

      The head of a major international federation allegedly taking ~$1M from Russian Federation to cover-up doping control positives..

      The physician who was responsible for the anti-doping program was also arrested

      "French police have placed proceedings on a more formal footing by not only placing Diack under investigation but by taking Dr Gabriel Dollé, the former director of the IAAF’s medical and anti-doping department, into custody in Nice. "

      Also covered here.......
      http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/nov/04/lamine-diack-investigation-iaaf-corruption-doping

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    2. What strikes me most of all in this is Coe is given 100% co operation into the investigation and the usual defensive tactics aren't being applied like we've seen when the German documentary came to light. Diack ruffled some feathers before he "left" especially among some of the athletes like Christine Ohuruogu. Wouldn't be surprised if they try to ladle the whole mess on Diack and/or his predecessors and say hey it's alright Lord Coe has the reigns now....wink, wink.

      Delete
  19. BREAKING NEWS: Nicolas Mahut has missed a drug test and could face a ban

    Source: https://twitter.com/livetennis

    They have caught a small fish in a big pond where there are also big sharks!!

    Obviously, they never catch those big sharks, as usual !!

    Nothing new under the sun!!

    Best regards.

    Fabrice

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    Replies
    1. Famous for the longest match at Wimbledon - wonder if they'll take down plague outside of court 18?

      Delete
    2. He merely missed a second test in a rolling 12 month period, which is within the rules..... Assuming he avoids an additional whereabouts failure in the next 4 weeks, he wont incur any sanction. Not a big deal..

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    3. yeah it's always the journeymen they catch. One would think doping only makes a player mediocre. 0_0

      Delete
  20. Venus williams could finish as high as no 7 in the rankings if she wins the wta elite trophy - not bad for a 35 yr old with a progressive illness.

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    Replies
    1. She made it! Exactly 20 years after her first top-20 victory.

      Delete
  21. Umpire Carlos Bernardes showed some impressive umpiring skills during the Djokvoic/Berdych match in Paris.

    http://www.tennistv.com/video/videoId/h5wlc7uplj9i1hi1fol7vjikz/title/umpire-catch--atp-paris-qf

    Though i note he still seems to be barred from officiating over any of Nadals matches. How long can Rafa hold a grudge against the guy for doing his job?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/tennis/rafaelnadal/11631798/French-Open-2015-Rafael-Nadal-admits-demanding-ban-on-umpire-Carlos-Bernardes-following-Rio-Open-dispute.html

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    Replies
    1. I still can't believe the ATP/ITF acquiesced to their demands re. Bernardes. So wrong on every level.

      Delete
  22. Djokovic is to tennis what Lance Armstrong is to cycling. In fact, with the wheels he demonstrated in Paris Djokovic should enter the Tour de France.

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    Replies
    1. I thought Nadal was the Lance Armstrong of tennis? Actually I think Djokovic is worse than Lance. If not, then this is the weakest tennis era ever. Djokovic has twice as many points as the #2 ranked player. He's won 6 Masters and 3 majors this year. How is that even possible? I'm still waiting for one of these top tennis players to come down with serious health issues a la Lance and his cancer. It's going to happen. I'm actually thinking that's why Nadal's level has dropped. That he was forced to scale down for health reasons. Or maybe he's trying to make a baby with his GF.

      Delete
    2. It's hard to watch any men's final with Djokovic these days and especially listening to the superlatives used to describe his play, with no irony or cynicsim. How many times can the commentators say words like "unbelievable" without reflecting on their own words.

      Delete
    3. @lopi: Might be it's already happened. Fish, Soderling, Tipsarevic, Ancic, and plenty others spring to mind.

      Delete
    4. Yup you may be right about those four.

      Delete
  23. Pound report on IAAF and Russian doping is truly shocking... Shadow labs, mass destruction of samples before WADA could have them retested in non-Russian labs, bribery, involvement of security forces. Unbelievable.

    Full report here: https://t.co/UAbeWxR80D

    Interestingly,it concludes that:
    “There is no reason to believe that athletics is the only sport in Russia to have been affected.”

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  24. Anyone have an idea of what is happening with the Puerto blood bags? In light of this WADA report their destruction is surely now unfeasible?

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  25. Lax anti-doping turns sport into a house of cards.... This is a quote from Dick Pound today....

    "The credibility of sport has taken some serious bodyblows over the last few months. The difficult for all of us is that it doesn’t stop there. The public view will move towards believing all sport is corrupt. If you can’t believe results then there is a serious credibility problem. I hope all sports will look at their governance and their anti-doping systems because their existence may be at risk."

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  26. USADAs strongly worded response to report outlining extent of Russian doping and corruption

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CTYSfi9WUAEL-RX.png

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  27. Some commenters on the Guardian's article about the Pound report even mention tennis, and the possibility that doping is present there too, especially with respect to one gentleman of the "Iberian persuasion":

    http://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2015/nov/08/sebastian-coe-iaaf-doping-investigation#comment-63002770

    I wonder if that commenter - "oldtrev" - is a THASP regular....

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  29. On the WADA report - what about the rest? Or is it more convenient to focus on big bad Putin and the gang? Kenya has already been painted with the scarlet letter of doping and corruption in the Ard documentary why is there being nothing said about their practices? what about all the athletes that vary in both sex and nationality whose ten year data is questionable? I'm sure there is at least one athlete who is happy the doping spotlight has passed the fringes of the European continent and across into Russia.

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  31. Coe gets roasted in this interview....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oBg6-_wrsOQ&feature=youtu.be

    How does he have any credibility to lead the IAAF? He was vice president of IAAF for 7 years, he eulogized out-going president Diack as the IAAFs "spiritual leader", and he is still apparently taking 6 figure annual payments from Nike, the multinational who sponsors Justin Gatlin?

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  32. Now that was an interview! Thanks for the link. Imagine if American TV news reporters did that sort of follow-up questioning, not being distracted at all by rhetoric. If only....

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  33. One of the good things about the IAAF/Russia scandal is that it raises public awareness of doping and corruption in pro-sports. Since the sports themselves are poorly incentivized to deal with the issues in a substantive manner, they will only be properly addressed when the public insist upon it. The public are, after all, the customer. They ultimately pay the bills. And the public should care. While the technical activities of sport (hitting a ball with a bat) are trivial in the human context, sport is important. We focus intensively upon it, we immerse ourselves in its stories, and absorb its values. It should project positive messages. Sports narrative can't be "profit by lying, cheating and stealing from opponents.



    This is a good article dealing with this.

    What happens if trust goes out of sport?
    "Sport matters because it has the potential to do what very little else in the world can: uniting communities, stirring the soul, strengthening the body, building bonds between disparate nations, offering individuals identity and an escape. But sport is not getting the governance it deserves. "
    "Where is your money going? Where is your affection being exploited? There are those who turn off the Diamond League when dope cheats are welcomed back. Others stop buying the trainers of companies who give those cheats shoe contracts. The fan is not an impotent consumer"

    http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/34767962

    I know I don't buy Nike products any more.............

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  34. Arsène Wenger has outlined his fear that doping in football is a serious but largely undetected problem.

    “For me, the beauty of sport is that everyone wants to win, but there will only be one winner. We have reached an era in which we glorify the winner, without looking at the means or the method. And, 10 years later we realise the guy was a cheat. And during that time, the one that came second suffered. He didn’t get recognition. And, with all that’s been said about them, they can be very unhappy.”

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/football/teams/arsenal/11987053/Arsenal-news-Arsene-Wenger-claims-football-has-widespread-doping-problem.html

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    Replies
    1. On twitter there's an extract from Merson's book that claims Wenger had the team take vitamins and other tablets and had syringes of "yellow gunk" into his arm. Merson didn't know what these were only that he was first in line for them.

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  35. I watched the flim on marco pantani - the accidental death of a cyclist (it's on netflix for anyone who has it) although a very tragic story it also painted the very bleak nature of doping within sport and the pressures on athletes to perform. There was even one quote from a ex cyclist before EPO was even introduced that "you can't win tour de france on mineral water"

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  36. For those who are interested, this is a long radio program about the IAAF scandal. It includes an interesting interview with Kris Akabusi, where he talks about about the choices he was confronted with when encouraged to dope (about 45 minutes through), as well as some politically correct but, smart/choice comments about Coe.
    http://talksport.com/athletics/kick-doping-sport-special-151110173864

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  37. "Russian Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko has accused the IAAF of concealing more than 150 doping cases, mostly from countries other than Russia."

    http://www.bigstory.ap.org/article/552998d5025f4e24b1fcc06e1b69a75f/latest-russia-offers-cooperation-ahead-iaaf-vote

    Who knows? Neither party exactly 'believable'.

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  38. "Doping scandals impossible in Russian tennis — official"...."Tennis is the purest sport"

    "Nothing threatens Russian tennis players’ participation in the 2016 Summer Olympics, the president of the Russian Tennis Federation says. This is just ruled out, tennis is the purest sport. So nothing threatens our players’ participation in the 2016 Summer Olympics.""

    http://tass.ru/en/sport/836279

    What an amazing quote. Might deserve it's own thread, ROFL

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  39. Roger Federer calls for more doping tests in tennis

    "He said he been tested out of competition about five times this year. “There needs to be more resources,” he said. “It’s very important. Players need to feel that there are going to be tests. So they will shy away from any silly thought they might have."

    “I’m always surprised when I walk off court after a final and I’m like ‘where is anti-doping?’”


    http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/nov/13/roger-federer-calls-for-doping-tests-tennis

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    1. As far as,"There needs to be more resources", he should remind himself that he earns a staggering amount of money, something like $50Millions a year ( among prize money and sponsors ), hence, if he doesn't put his wallet where his mouth is, he is just talking the talk but he can't walk the walk!!!!

      In other words, talk is cheap!!!!

      Nothing new under the sun!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      1PS even Nadal has recently made a strong declaration in that kind of direction but you know what? Again: Talk is cheap!!!! As usual!!

      2PS A True Leader gives the practical example straightaway, instead in professional tennis, top players ( ATP and WTA ) are only money machine for the joy of gullible fans!!

      They are just money leaders, quite different!!

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    3. This again....
      Individual wealthy athletes can't fund anti-doping endeavors while actively participating. If they did so, there would be a glaring conflict of interest. We already this saw play out with Armstrong's "donations" to UCI for anti-doping equipment.

      Athletes can't fund anti-doping till their last stored sample is no longer eligible for analysis.

      Delete
    4. I think Roger knows that there is a problem with some of the athletes and comments that he and Andy Murray have made give me the sense that they can't prove their suspicions but are hopeful for an eventual positive test. Of course, they may be implicated themselves and just engaging in misdirection, but I am not convinced.

      Delete
    5. Of course, I took for granted that their money should be donated to independent third agencies, WADA is the most important for example, anyway, it isn't the only one!!

      However, Andy Murray has just said:

      "We have incredibly high prize money - he said - and if I were asked to contribute to the scientific research I wouldn't have any problem to do it. Anti doping controls are necessary but they aren't enough, it also needs the scientific research. Look Armstrong for example, he said he was tested hundreds of times, but has never tested positive "

      Source:

      http://www.gazzetta.it/Tennis/13-11-2015/tennis-doping-parla-federer-nel-nostro-sport-servono-piu-controlli-130912253831.shtml

      Obviously, also in his case, talk is cheap beacuse he can contribute on a voluntary basis, any time, any where and he could give any amount of money he would like to give!!

      For example, he could start giving his money to drug-testing expert Don Catlin!!

      Here is an interesting article about this special man!!

      The Awful Truth About Drugs in Sports
      Cheaters can't be stopped. Testing costs a fortune. It's shockingly easy to beat the system. The drug cops are perpetually playing catch-up. Says who? Drug-testing expert Don Catlin, that's who. He's the doping detective who helped break the BALCO scandal wide open—and the man who's about to launch a radical new campaign to finally solve the problem.....

      http://www.outsideonline.com/1823621/awful-truth-about-drugs-sports

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      PS obviously Djokovic doesn't agree at all !!

      The number one in the world, Novak Djokovic, isn't of the same opinion: "I think we are tested enough - he said - we never had big problems with doping. During the season it is easy to find us, we are around at tournaments all year. In the few days when we are at home instead we must always be available and if for just two times we aren't available, we are suspended, it seems to me too much"

      Source: the same link above mentioned.

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    6. I don't know what to make of this. The most honest of the 4 in this instance might just be Djokovic; I mean, the irony of Nadal talking about doping.

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    7. “I’m always surprised when I walk off court after a final and I’m like ‘where is anti-doping?’

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFPRBSnus0o

      Lol

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    8. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    9. “I’m always surprised when I walk off court after a final and I’m like ‘where is anti-doping?’

      Didn't Federer complain some years ago that when he won Dubai, Rotterdam and Indian Wells in a row he wasn't drug tested once? It seems nothing has changed. Awaiting Stuart Miller's response.

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  40. Posted without comment:

    http://espn.go.com/tennis/story/_/id/14119838/andy-murray-rafa-nadal-roger-federer-line-demand-transparency-drug-testing

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  41. You should say something: like, I don't buy any of this old bullsh.t from the players. They said all the same old baloney after the Armstrong fiasco and look what happened then. Nothing much.

    If professional tennis players were as honest and morally resolute as they like to present themselves, then they would long ago have made their opions matter through their own professional organisations. They could have passed resolutions to oblige the directors of their own professional bodies to raise the anti-doping banner within their own sport and to take that fight to the ITF and the lavishly-rich roof-raisers of the grand slam committees.

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    Replies
    1. But there again, who's ever heard of a turkey voting for Christmas?

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    2. You have just made me laugh!! Thank you very much!!

      Your words "who's ever heard of a turkey voting for Christmas?" sum up very well their false ( to say the least! ) attitude!!

      Brilliant irony!! Congratulations!!

      All the best! Fabrice

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    3. Grazie, Fabrice, per il complimento ma è un detto, un modo da dire, americano o inglese ovviamente.

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  42. Marat Safin says accusing Russian athletes of doping without evidence is unfair.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRativzWvSU (in Russian)

    Didn't Marat and his little sis train at TennisVal?

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  43. Here's Murray confirming Omerta's at full force in tennis.

    "And in small worlds, you usually get a good sense of what everyone is like. You hear things. And trust me: When someone is a “bad apple,” in any way, you’re definitely going to hear things."

    http://www.theplayerstribune.com/andy-murray-cancer-charity-tennis/

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    Replies
    1. Disappointing to read this. You might hear about a bad apple, like Odesnik, but doping is covert and tennis is an individual sport, so there is no guarantee. This is not like the team environment of cycling.

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  44. Enough enough with this childish Fed is least likely to dope because you loved the style of play the guy is playing. Sampras was even more explosive player than Fed at his peak yet he looked like a zombie when he reached the 30 years old mark. Yet we shouldnt question Fed. The reality is all of them dopes. Novak even put it on to your eyes with his Armstrong type stamina and cyclists type of physic age nearly 29. Rafa also doper but his real physical prime came in when we was 22 years old in 2008. At least Spanish team can play the youth card. Novak just put on to your eye along with Fed. I also get the feeling reading this side that nobody cares who is a doper or not people only cares the other doper they dont like that much beating their favorite player which is also a doper.

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