Saturday, November 14, 2015

"Tennis is the purest sport"

Doping is all the rage in the news again....did something happen?

One view: "The doping scandals such as in athletics are impossible in tennis," Tarpishchev [Shamil Tarpishchev, the president of the Russian Tennis Federation] said. "This is just ruled out, tennis is the purest sport. So nothing threatens our players’ participation in the 2016 Summer Olympics."

Another view: "I'm always surprised when I walk off court after a final and I'm like 'where is anti-doping?'"

One more: "The whereabouts demands are a little bit too much and a bit unnecessary to write where you are every single day of the year."

Last one: "Sports events should redirect some of the prize money rather than it going to the athletes and put it into the anti-doping bodies to make the testing protocol better."

I'm sure Jon Wertheim will get the ITF to comment. 

54 comments:

  1. Federer just repeats what he has been saying for years. Many will see it as a sign of his decline, looking for cheap excuses being a miserable loser. I'm not sure that he is clean himself, but have no doubt at all with regard to those players that have transformed tennis into an endurance sport. The iron man from Mallorca, the most injured top athlete in sports history, going on cycles of ups and downs almost like Armstrong on the Tour de France, has been so obvious for all these years...

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  2. http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/a-possible-answer-to-the-do-tennis-pros-use-steroids.548517/

    What are you waiting for? Burn the infidel!

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    Replies
    1. The Carbon Isotope Ratio test detects the use of testosterone.

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    2. Carbon Isotope Ratio testing detects the ration of carbon isotopes --- which is where its name comes from. Testosterone is a natural hormone produced by your body and used by your body. Therefore, every male athlete on the planet would "use" testosterone.

      What the CIR does is measure the % of carbon isotopes to determine if the ratio appears to come from a natural or man-made source. If you use made made formulation that closely matches your own CIR for natural testosterone, then the test will not show you as using man made testosterone -- you will pass the test.

      This is the fundamental problem with anti-doping. People think "Oh, there is a test for such-and-such. Therefore, if people use such-and-such, they will test positive." This simply is not true.

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    3. "Robin Haase has abnormally high levels of testosterone, but in a letter he received from the ATP, they said it the abnormal level could very well be natural."
      http://www.10sballs.com/2013/11/25/haase-had-high-levels-of-testosterone/

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    4. Yes of course when I said "use of testosterone" I meant the use of exogenous testosterone. I would think that goes without saying.

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  3. All these players' comments amount to is a bit of pub talk following the IAAF revelations. As I wrote on the other post, professional tennis players have plenty of opportunity to pursue the matter through their professional bodies (WTA/ATP) were they serious in their opinions. They don't have to spend time themselves worrying about it - they are after all eilte athletes who should concentrate of the day job - but they do have perfectly competent directors and managers to do the heavy lifting for them were the commitment really there. As usual silence reigns within both these player organisations, as it does, regrettably, with the ITF and ultra-rich roof-builders of the Grand Slam committees. Nor are tennis players routinely being outed for peds to indicate the anti-doping regime is actually working. Inferentially, knowing how doping is now rife in all other major sports, it rather suggests that the tennis anti-dopers are still fast asleep to the point of snoring.

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    1. When high profile players such as Roger and Andy speak out and it appears in news outlets around the world, and raises awareness of a potential issue and adds a little pressure on the ATP. Better that someone speaks out rather than and everyone being silent on the matter imo. Other than that, its not the players job to police the sport.

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    2. "its not the players job to police the sport."
      It is actually one of their responsibilities. We can actually say this is impossible if doping is prevalent because, according to Murray, "everyone knows when someone is a bad apple".

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    3. Players don't have to put 'pressure' on the ATP by talking to journalists. The ATP is a representative body of the players and is partly owned by them. Players can make decisions internally which mandate the ATP to act. I see no such action.

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    4. Or... some players try to lobby the ATP but frustrated and making no headway up against all the vested interests, they resort to public statements in the media.

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    5. And we return to the top players. Remember Kyrgios being fined by the ATP after Wawrinka´s pressure? Remember Bernardes being 'banned' by the ATP from Nadal's matches? Remember Murray saying that everybody knows if someone is a bad apple?

      Should I say more?

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  4. The players can't police themselves for one simple reason: conflict of interest. Their role as players is to get the best possible result on court. Unfortunately, doping may also help them to do that. The responsibility for ensuring the game is clean requires an independent body, for whom detecting and penalising cheats is its sole responsibility. That also effectively rules out tennis's governing bodies, who are also concerned to promote the sport and increase its revenues. Self-regulation is not the answer for a problem such as this.

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    Replies
    1. What are you saying?

      The ATP is the governing body of the men's professional tennis and like the governing body of any other profession that can be managed very good or badly, as a logical consequence, the same principle must be applied to ATP!!

      In practice, in this case ( anti doping rules ) it means that ATP can be super effective from any point of view and so very reliable or on the other hand, ATP can be ineffective from almost any point of view and not reliable at all !!



      Apart form that, the key point of the whole matter lies in this 2 following simple questions:

      1) Who do top tennis players mainly serve?

      Answer:

      They entertain audience for their sport performance on tennis court!

      2) Is most of the audience made up of people who do sports regularly, people who really know what intense physical efforts mean?

      Answer:

      No, most of the audience is made up of people who basically lead a sedentary lifestyle!

      As a logical consequence, most of the audience can be deceived very easily regarding the hidden truths of professional sport performance on tennis court!



      At this point, the most important and spontaneous question arises:

      Where are the journalists?

      Do they believe that they are only an important part of the audience and so the only thing they want is to entartein themselves as well and in the meanwhile they write some balls to make the sport event more spectacular?

      Is this real journalism or is it only "Infotainment"?

      Here is the definition of "Infotainment":

      Infotainment is a neologistic portmanteau of information and entertainment, referring to a type of media which provides a combination of information and entertainment

      The label "infotainment" is emblematic of concern and criticism that journalism is devolving from a medium which conveys serious information about issues affecting public interest, into a form of entertainment which happens to have fresh "facts" in the mix....

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infotainment

      No further comment is necessary!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

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    2. Were you sober when you wrote that?

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  5. If there is one here who isn't sober at all is only you because you have put too much emphasis on the fact that all the matter depends on the "conflict of interest" you have pointed out!!

    But I remind you a simple fact: top tennis players aren't poor people at all and if they wanted a clean professional sport, they would earn well in any case!!

    The obvious truth is instead that they are just too greedy like many other professionals who work in economic sectors where there are a lot of money around and in which there is also an asymmetry of information from the outset!!

    That's it!!

    Goodbye!

    Fabrice



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    Replies
    1. Players will not dob themselves in. Or each other. The ruling bodies won't bust the players on whom the sport depends for its reputation and revenues. Only an independent body is truly capable of going after the cheats.

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  6. Great interview with Renee Anne Shirley, who was involved with Jamaican anti-doping, and was the whistle-blower with respect to the laxity of anti-doping in that country.

    http://sportsscientists.com/2015/11/interview-with-renee-anne-shirley/

    "I was given responsibility for overseeing the development of Jamaica’s Anti-Doping in Sport Programme (2003-2007).
    But the more involved I got the more I learnt about what I like to refer to as the ‘threads in the spider’s web’ – that’s to say there are interwoven links between doping by elite athletes (who want to gain a competitive edge) and corruption in sport governance that is both wide and deep and covers the entire globe."

    "My current position is that doping is prevalent at the elite level across sport & across nations. Testing now being carried out is largely ineffective and most cheaters are not being caught."

    "I am not sure that the general public can truly appreciate the incestuous interwoven connections between corruption and the breakdown of good governance practices and accountability within the major sport administrations."

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    Replies
    1. Very interesting. That seems to be confirmation of what many suspect.

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  7. An "over the hill" and "finished" Nadal is crushing his grand slam winning opponents in the WTF. The long decline seems to be over. He is in danger of winning the title. For the first time in his career. What a relief for Uncle Toni. They appear to have fixed whatever ailed him.

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    Replies
    1. No wonder it's called the WTF??!! Finals!

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    2. His doping cycle change was pretty obvious since WTF 2013.

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    3. Its completely crazy : Nadal may win the only big title he never got in his worst season ever so far:-)

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    4. He's starting to look like the dominant Nadal of old in this tourney. Certainly a doping cycle change as Unknown mentioned. Which means that next year he'll be back in full swing to try to dethrone Djoker. Except that an uber doped Djoker seems more likely to win over an uber doped Nadal except during clay season. Anyhow, tomorrow will be very telling of how next year shapes up b/w these two once again. Welcome back, Nadoped!

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    5. And then he gets hopelessly routined by Djokovic.

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  9. NADOs from Russia, Andorra, Israel, Argentina, Bolivia & Ukraine declared non-complaint by WADA.

    Others were put on the non-compliance watch-list were Brazil, Belgium, France, Greece, Mexico & Spain (Qué sorpresa, ¿no?).

    There were 8 (!) NADOs using non-WADA accredited labs for testing... Belgium, Germany, Brazil, France, Greece, Mexico, and Spain all require "legislation and government action to become fully compliant".

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    Replies
    1. I was wondering how the NADOs work when a player lives most of the time outside the country for which they play. For example, how often does Russia have testing access to Maria Sharapova (who lives mostly in the US); or Serbia to Novak Djokovic (whose residence is in Monaco). Very interesting non-compliant list.

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  10. In other news, Greek tennis player Alexandros Jakupovic has been found guilty of 5 offenses under the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program.

    Career high 464. Another minnow, so. Has to be said, though, that the temptation to fix matches is largely restricted to the players who are not making a good living.

    http://www.tennisintegrityunit.com/media/30/tennis-player-alexandros-jakupovic-found-guilty-of-breaches-of-the-tennis-anti-corruption-program/

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    Replies
    1. The message being that the elite are not doping. Renew Anne Shirley must have it wrong.

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    2. But at the same time banned-for-life liar and fraud David Savic allowed back in to tennis (to coach only) after providing the usual 'substantial assistance' to the Tennis Integrity Unit. I wonder what that's all about as he's been out the scene for quite a while.

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    3. Here's the link:-

      http://www.sportsintegrityinitiative.com/substantial-assistance-allows-savic-to-coach-from-march-2016/

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  11. Doping discussions tend to put the emphasis on dopers, anti-dopers and federations. I often feel that the clean athletes get overlooked. This is lamentable since they're the primary victim of doping (with audiences coming a close second).
    In these interviews, Travis Tygart puts the focus back on them.

    'We are at a crossroads'
    "Travis Tygart, chief executive of the United States Anti-Doping Agency, said athletics is "at a crossroads" and declared the current investigation is the biggest since Wada was formed in 1999.
    "We have to decide," he told BBC Sport. "Are we going to end up regulating ourselves to be a toothless bureaucracy or are we going to roll up our sleeves and get into the field of play and win this fight for clean athletes? The eyes of the clean athletes are watching.
    "I don't think we have seen something on this scale since Wada took over. It far eclipses anything we have seen from corruption and impacts on the rights of clean athletes. It is why it is so important.
    "We, as the world anti-doping community, have to step up for them and support their decision to do it the right way or we might as well walk away and throw in the towel and quit the charade."


    When asked about the Countries that have breached WADA codes have failed to respond to the organization’s request for information on doping in their respective countries to be implemented immediately, he called the lack of action “a gut kick to clean athletes”.

    http://www.bbc.com/sport/athletics/34860136
    and
    http://www.voicechronicle.com/82421-20-reedie-warns-the-world-is-watching-after-rusada-declared-non-compliant/

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  12. Funny that a Djokovic vs Nadal match is less gritty than a Federer vs Nishikori one. And that a pouncing one-handed backhand used by a stronger player (Wawrinka) was matched by a more delicate one used by a weaker player.

    Don't you think the WTF is THE tournament to show who best doper is?

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    Replies
    1. "Don't you think the WTF is THE tournament to show who best doper is?"

      And the Serb wins a 4th consecutive WTF title, so all hail the reigning king of the dopers Novak Djokovic. He's been looking very lean recently. Much leaner than last year and 2011.

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    2. Indeed.

      http://cyclingtips.com.au/2012/11/blood-doping-101/

      Can we agree that Fed & Nole are the best active dopers?

      Seems Rod Laver was pretty good too.
      http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/if-djokovic-wins-wtf-does-he-pass-lavers-69-as-top-year-in-open-era-or-still-behind.548208/#post-9791098

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    3. @Unknown

      Laver? Why don't you just say that anyone who wins a match must be doping? You have as much evidence.

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    4. Well, Unkonwn also thinks that Murray is a more obvious doper than Djokovic. Even though the so called "Big 4" could all be benefiting from PEDs I think looking at their overall careers Djokovic and Nadal have more red flags than the other two.

      But maybe it doesn't really matter and every player who wins a match is on drugs.

      As for Laver, maybe some Lucky Strikes?

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    5. The Aussies liked a beer, too. Now you've got me thinking.

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    6. Really, guys? Are you really promoting anti-doping yet ignore doping's history? Did you think doping began with Nadal and will end with Djokovic?

      Don't you think that the person with the greatest season ever (Laver) wasn't possibly doping? Are you blinded with your own delusional definition of the word 'evidence' (which you, ironically, don't have, on anyone), that you keep on repeating it when someone disagrees with you?

      I'm always thrilled with your answers in this blog. It's like a little circle of pals nodding when someone inside the circle says the most obvious or stupid things. What's next, fellas? The ATP's mantra 'tennis is clean' is true? After all, no one dopes but Nadal and Djokovic. Statistically, they pretty much nailed it. 2 players of thousands is a great record.

      Long live Kermode.

      http://www.tennisworldusa.org/Boris-Becker-Novak-Djokovic-can-improve-Federer-I-dont-know-how-he-does-it-articolo28084.html
      By the way, do you think a doper knows a doper?
      On Roger Federer: "I don't know how he does it, he is 34 and is always difficult and tough to beat. He's getting incredible results. Better ask him, he has a secret about it!"

      Oh wait. I forgot Becker is from the Pre-Nadal era, so doping didn't exist back then.
      Silly, silly me.

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    7. "Did you think doping began with Nadal and will end with Djokovic?"

      And where did we mention that? I think it's most will agree here that doping has existed in Tennis for decades. The major pioneers were probably Lendl and Navratilova (not forgetting players who were partial to Coke, not the drink). Perhaps you should go back and read some comments.

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    8. @Richard

      Alcohol and Cigarettes were all the rave back then and let's not forget all those Tour de France riders who were sipping some during races. Cycling whilst tipsy, ha! Did Laver ever turn up to a match drunk?

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    9. @Unknown

      I have never maintained or implied doping began with Nadal and ends with Djokovic. I well recall doping in sports from the 1960's onwards. However the existence of the problem did not of itself enable a conclusion that every sportsman/woman must therefore be doping, in the same sense that because tax evasion occurs everyone who pays taxes must therefore be a tax evader. It does not follow. You are cynical about the use of the term "evidence" but, yes, evidence is what is required if you are going to draw conclusions of fact. In your case, you fail to distinguish a conclusion supported by evidence from mere supposition or assertion.

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  14. Your all barking mad, going on and on about something you could possibly not know anything about. Something youve made up. Guessed. Absolutely pointless without evidence. Your actually going on like its a fact!! One day maybe we will know who is doping....and let me ask you this question. If Nadal was doping then how comes he hasnt won for 18 months. If he was doping hed be winning everything including beating Djokovic. ...?? Not rocket science! !

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    Replies
    1. Cilic, Troiki and Barbara Strycova, amongst others, have all served doping bans. So what titles were they cleaning up? Everything is simple to a simple mind. Especially rocket science.

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  15. Ok so why not use those names instead!! Not rocket science 😀

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    1. Of course you miss the point. Doping doesn't guarantee that you - or even Nadal - will win everything every time. That is because others are also doping, and if your base level has fallen following injury or even simply as a result of natural ageing then doping may not be sufficient to restore you to your previous levels. But you would know this if you has done any reading on the topic. Rocket man.

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    2. Still unproven for Rafa and Fed ect. *Rocket lady.

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    3. "Do you want to see the truth - or hang on to your dreams?"

      Former agent of Caribbean and global sports stars to Jamaican whistle- blower and anti- doping expert, Renee Anne Shirley.

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