Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Fast & Furious

Tennis is getting bad press from all directions. It's hard to keep up with all the stories. Here are some of the more important links:

ITF claims testing is random, players suggest it takes place only after defeat

Rafael Nadal Threatens Lawsuit Over Renewed Doping Allegations

Match-Fixers Targeted Half My Players, Says Tennis Manager

The gambler and the top-50 tennis players

Here’s The Evidence of ‘Worldwide’ Match-Fixing that Prosecutors Say Tennis Ignored

Evert: PEDs Part of All Sports, Sharapova Should Release Medical Records
Evert: "Maybe (other players) don't want to throw rocks at a glass house. I don't know, I think everybody is being very guarded and careful not to point the finger. And I don't have any proof. But my opinion is science and PEDs have always seemed to be like ahead of the game—if you understand what I'm saying. I don't want to say anymore because I don't want to cause any more trouble. But I just think the medical records need to be shown to clear her."

117 comments:

  1. Match-Fixers Targeted Half My Players, Says Tennis Manager

    ALAN MOORE managed a group of Russian players until three years ago, when he said he stopped working in tennis because the extent of the corruption in the sport “wears your mind out and you just can’t do it anymore.”


    --

    I may have posted this before, but I'll post it again. It's Moore, more or less confirming that silent bans exist in Tennis.


    The fear of the known: drugs and matchfixing in football
    by Alan Moore

    "Doctor Luis Garcia del Moral is best known for setting up the doping system for the US Postal cycling team, he also had more than a decade of guiding tennis players at the Spanish TenisVal Academy. A tennis player my former company managed went to train at TenisVal some years ago – breaking her contract to do so. She returned to Croatia leaner, stronger and with notable skin irritations. It came as no surprise that a random drugs test found her to have taken anabolic steroids, amongst other banned drugs. She received a 6 month ban and went back on tour. I was told the governing body of tennis, the ITF, were informed fully of what had happened, yet in the almost 6 years that have passed nothing has happened.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20130530095923/http://backpagefootball.com/the-fear-of-the-known-drugs-and-matchfixing-in-football/52993/

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  2. Just a wee clarification, our players were not just Russian. Also, this old article I followed up on, with more recent info, and I will always say there are far, far worse crimes in tennis than match-fixing and doping, yet they will never be addressed.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for replying, Alan. Have you got a link to this recent article, I would love to read it. Also when you say that there are far worse crimes in Tennis, what do you mean? Surely not organised crime or anything like that? Though I wouldn't be surprised.



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    2. Far worse crimes? Like what? Manipulating the draw? Slowing all courts?

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    3. Far worst crimes? They'll never be addressed if nobody speaks about them. I think the word of the moment is "omerta"

      @Manus, i'm glad i'm not the only one who thinks the draws are manipulated.

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    4. You're welcome UK9, I've put the link to one of them below.

      @Manas and GMurph, far worse crimes are the tour predators (male and female), child physical, emotional and sexual abuse, and the lack of player and parent education and support. Some countries are better than others, though in my experience it is far worse than doping and match-fixing combined. Unless we get this single basic right, the other 2 are simple and logical by-products.

      http://backpagefootball.com/hippo-room-serena-slam-vroom-froome-football-questions/97609/

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    5. Also meant to add this one, part of a series, the English versions are rather watered down (due to libel laws) http://backpagefootball.com/hippo-room-footballs-dark-past-present-load-red-bull/97672/

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    6. I have often wondered about the young women on the tour and their vulnerability both at the hands of their parents and sponsors. Even the Maria Sharapova situation is troubling if it's true she was first given this drug as a teenager. She has responsibility for her adult decisions but how many very young tennis players understand the contents of everything they are being fed.

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    7. @Almo, got it, fully agreed, but if we take an even bigger picture, today around 19'000 children under 5 starved to death, just like yesterday, and tomorrow, and after... In that sense, there is no reason to feel bad about people taking EPO

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    8. Reading Andy's Murray's biography, i was surprised to learn his parents sent him to board at a Tennis Academy in Barcelona because they weren't impressed with the level of Training in England.
      Sending your kids away to boarding school at such a young age seems a little Victorian to me.

      I'd imagine such a separation from your parents and a child's well being put in the trust of those in charge of these academies is a dangerous situation for a child to be in. A child predator could easy operate unheeded like Bob Hewitt.
      Also i heard this term called the meat grinder in Tennis academies where children are subjected an onslaught of competitive Tennis from older players to build up resilient for their career. Seems a little brutal to me. When you see the adults that come out of Tennis like Caprati (and her anger management issues) makes you wonder what sort of childhood they had in Tennis.
      If the ITF are burying doping and match scandals you can bet overseeing of their child protection policy is just as lax.

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    9. @Manas - 100% agree. There are far worse things than some rich Russo-Yank doping her brains out, I'd rather the column inches were devoted to sensible discussion on migrants and solving massive global issues.

      @Gmurph - 2 simple facts - 1. To reach the top in a sport, especially a solo one like tennis/cycling/swimming, you need to be a sociopath. 2. The mental age of most players is far lower than their real age, especially girls. Boys can act the lad and enjoy camaraderie on tour (hence prevalence of matchfixing), girls are either banished to an academy and preyed upon, cloistered and babyed by overbearing parents (then go off the rails) or sent off after a time with a coach and open to all sorts.

      All the nice links and words on child and player welfare are a load of boll@x (pardon my english) as the reality on the tour is far worse. Predators exist in all walks of life, sports where sociopaths prosper (like tennis, cycling and swimming) attract them even more.

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  3. Chris Evert is the usual chatty sport journalist when there are white blondes at stake ( she has been a big fan of Sharapova for a long time and she even predicted a stellar future for Eugenie Bouchard..!) because the facts are quite different:

    Key details in Sharapova’s case remain unclear. When tennis players submit to doping tests, they are given a form that asks them to “declare any medications, substances or supplements that you are taking or have taken in the last seven days, irrespective of their source and your perceived risk of taking those substances,” according to the ITF’s guide to sample collection. The reason: “This section is provided for your protection, in order that you can show that you are not concealing the use of any such supplement, substance or medication.”

    Haggerty would not say whether Sharapova listed Mildronate on her form in Australia or any time in the past.

    “Out of respect for the ITF process and a strong desire not to litigate the matter in the press, I must refrain from proving answers to these questions to the media,” he said via email.

    Source: http://www.wsj.com/articles/in-tennis-no-tears-are-shed-for-maria-sharapova-1457739940

    Hence, I wouldn't be surprised at all if her lawyer and manager stirred the pot to support false evidence in reference to that kind of form above mentioned!!

    Best regards.

    Fabrice

    PS bloody wars have been made on the base of false evidence, imagine what it could happen in the "Big Family of Tennis"!!
    The sky's the limit!!

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  4. Hey guys, I'm currently unsure on what happened to the Fuentes BloodBags. Did the spanish court continue to burn them or are they still available for investigation?

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    Replies
    1. Ruling is expected this month

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/cycling/2016/03/09/operacion-puerto-blood-bags-ruling-expected-this-month/

      Delete

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    ReplyDelete
  6. Updates about match fixing in tennis!!

    Tennis authorities deny Italian claims over match-fixing evidence

    Tennis Integrity Unit criticises prosecutor Roberto Di Martino for lack of help
    • Cremona official says he has files on 37 players over match-fixing allegations


    Tennis authorities say they “strongly refute” claims made by an Italian prosecutor that they have ignored evidence of match-fixing in the sport.

    Roberto Di Martino, the chief prosecutor in Cremona, had called for more than two dozen top players to be investigated by the Tennis Integrity Unit for possible links to betting rings. Di Martino told Buzzfeed and the BBC that he had evidence that players were offered between €50,000 and €300,000 to throw matches.

    He also claimed that his files included references to at least 37 players, only eight of whom are Italian and 29 of whom have ranked in the top 50.....

    http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/mar/15/tennis-integrity-unit-match-fixing-allegations

    Best regards.

    Fabrice

    PS Tennis Integrity Unit has always eaten small fish !!

    What a strange coincidence...!!

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  8. Isn't anyone really starting to doubt the dubious circumstances of federer's injury now that a lot has been happening? I mean, i'm a big federer fan, but it was always weird to me how the injury supposedly happened. It was a red flag to me, but i guess my biases ignored it. now, with him keeping quiet amidst the drama, i'm not really sure if i should believe him on this, despite being convinced for a long time that he has been one of the biggest advocates of anti-doping. surely, it needs more attention?

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    Replies
    1. This one is really simple. If he comes back and spends the rest of the year struggling to find form like Murray did after his back op, then it was probably legit. But if he quickly returns to winning ways, playing lights out tennis, like Nadal did, and picks up his Olympic gold etc, then we know for sure he is a doper.

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    3. Type on google these 3 words:

      Federer doping blog


      and you'll read a dedicated blog to that matter!!

      Anyway, the latest updates of that blog date back to 2011 but several clues are still there!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

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    4. Federer was always secretive about his health. Even if he injured himself during the match, he wouldn't say so as it might be understood as him looking for excuses. But the timing of this strange injury is as bad as it gets with relation to the ongoing rumours, and his physical level at his age, still playing constantly at No 2, is, well, impressive. In the pack with Nadal and Djokovic, he is just not the first that comed to mind nor the most obvious. You would also think that he would have an entourage smart, careful and experienced enough for him not to get caught and having to take a silent ban. If anyone, he might be given the benefit of the doubt. But my optimism regarding his case has steadily decreased over the past years. Why would he be different, when trying to overcome the challenge of players that outplay him repeatedly in the important matches?

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    5. If he had knee surgery, there'll be laproscopic scars. It's not like his knees are hidden when he competes. This is why I think it's unlikely that this injury break is not legit. If it was dodgy, he would not have mentioned operative management.

      Delete
    6. As much as I admire Federer, to save himself, why not have a surgeon make cuts in his knee that look right without actually having surgery, then limp around a bit, then regain form, etc?

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    7. The only thing about Federer that, to me, could give rise to conjecture is his ability to play as well as he does at his age. That said, there is nothing about the way he actually plays that of itself suggests doping. Nor is there anything about him physically, including his relatively few injuries, that raises any red flags. The only remaining question is whether anyone now can make it to the top of the game without doping. I don't know. However, I do believe the game is changing because of doping and this is particularly observable in the greatly increased athleticism that has now become typical on the tour.

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    8. Federer's keeping quiet amidst the drama, but he's posting pictures of himself training etc. He's still scheduled to play in Monte Carlo from the 9th of April. That would be 2.5 months after the injury. To what kind of suspension do you think that would correspond? Doesn't make any sense.

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    10. Fab Farn, are you serious about this Federer doping blog? You seem quite excited, or shocked... I had a look at the site and I remember it. It is a stupid (I mean really stupid - look at the story line) attempt at responding to the THASP blog, probably by some of the persons who were ridiculed on here for their silly stances. Pro-Nadal fans, anti Federer. Now that Djokovic has emerged, there is less need to write anti-Federer blogs.

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    12. Ahh "Federer doping blog", entertaining. JMF is right, if you look back at the comment section from one of the 2010 posts from THASP, you'll see exactly how that blog started. A delusional Nadal fan, went rouge.

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    13. @JMF i'm not talking about a suspension. i'm talking about a possible doping period. you can look at a player as clean as you like, but to put one player in the cross-hairs while another seems to get a pass on any circumstance is not being a fair observer.

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    14. @JMF

      I'm not excited and shocked at all!!

      (I've known that blog for a long time! )

      I simply approach the subject of "Doping in professional sports" with the same independent and competent mentality of Jericho 20:

      "you can look at a player as clean as you like, but to put one player in the cross-hairs while another seems to get a pass on any circumstance is not being a fair observer"

      In few words:

      "The search for truth is more precious than its possession" by Albert Einstein

      Best regards

      Fabrice



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    15. The fairytale goes like this: the talented Roger was playing such wonderful and precise tennis, that his opponents had to overcome his dominace by using brute force, magic potions and a conspiracy to slow down all courts. But even so, Roger continued to play until the doping ridden bodies of his opponents weakened and their reputation got affected by us spectators observing the obvious and commenting about it across the internet. In the end, they got stripped of their titles and the record of the last clean tennis player, which was anyway never broken, was assured for eternety; or at least until his double twins would start playing pro tennis. This horribly bad blog about Federer blood doping deserves one credit, to open the eyes to those believing in such ridiculous fairytales. Cyclism has gone, athletics have gone, tennis is on its way out. People have stopped believing in fairytales.

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    16. @Jericho20 - You clearly wrote that people should doubt the circumstances of Federer's injury "now that a lot has happened". The only thing that's happened is the Sharapova case - she has been caught doping during the AO. The only thing you could have implied is that Federer was also caught doping. There were no news about people taking time off to dope. But to serve a sentence. And the logic that if someone's doping, then all the others are doping is faulty. At least here, we've discussed for years why those players who rely on strength and stamina should be prime suspects. Now you have those that have fantastic concentration, perfect reaction time to missiles served etc.

      @Fab Farn - I knew you are not surprised, I was being ironic. You put a lot of exclamation marks, that's why I sensed you're excited. But I really didn't understand why you would say that blog has useful information. It really looks like a lot of crap. Someone claiming to be an independent mind and quoting latin and Einstein should be able to have some minimum quality / veracity standards.

      @ Manas. Federer is at least on record (although I need the exact quote and source) saying that tennis needs more testing, and that samples should be kept for years.
      And courts have slowed down, mind you. Perhaps not because of Federer, but it certainly didn't play to his advantage.

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    17. Ah, and you guys will be happy to be able to watch Federer at the Miami Open (presented by Itau ;)

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    18. @JMF

      I've also written in plain English ( not in German! ) the following words:

      "To put one player in the cross-hairs while another seems to get a pass on any circumstance is not being a fair observer"

      Hence, if in your opinion, your Federer deserves a pass on ony suspicious circumstance related to doping, the problem has been, remain and is yours not mine!!

      For example, if Federer was clean 100% and a true leader at the same time, he would be the first top player to give up the time slot once for ever!!

      But, what a strange coincidence..., he has never spoken about giving up the time slot!!

      Don't you know deeply how the time slots for anti doping controls OOC (out of competition) work in professional tennis?

      Here it is a good explanation:

      http://tennishasasteroidproblem.blogspot.it/2016/02/2015-itf-anti-doping-statistics-per.html#comment-form

      ( my first two posts )

      After reading those two posts, any person with a minimum intellectual honesty would start to have some serious doubts even on tennis player like Federer!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice








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    19. @ Fab Farn

      Yes, you have written in English something that you believe makes a lot of sense (all of the major players should be examined with the same attention), but I don't subscribe to what you're probably implying - basically "that all sides are probably equally guilty".

      I also don't understand (even after looking at your link) what "giving up your timeslot" means. You mean publish it? Or say I don't need a timeslot, test me whenever you want? Please clarify.

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    20. @JMF

      1) As far as "you're probably implying basically "that all sides are probably equally guilty".

      I haven't implied such a thing at all because for example one thing is to steal $100 and another completely different thing is to steal $1Million, the same is true for doping in professional sports!!

      It isn't rocket science, it's just basic logic!!


      2) As far as "I also don't understand (even after looking at your link) what "giving up your timeslot" means "

      Obviously, I meant "test me whenever you want" in anti doping controls OOC (out of competition) as Alex Schwarzer (under the guide of Professor Sandro Donati, the Italian hero of anti doping ) has already made it, still makes it and will make it!!

      Anyway, I already pointed out this point very clearly in my second post within the link above mentioned!!

      ( It starts in this way:

      " 4)If the top tennis players keep on saying that they are clean sport professionals, why don't they give up the "Time Slot" ( above mentioned ) as Alex Schwarzer has already made it?....." )

      3)A finale note!!

      Another point that no one wants to notice is the obvious following thing.

      Federer has often sung the praises of Nadal:

      "The way he plays tennis has been crucial for my improvement as a professional player from any point of view, I appreciate him a lot as a tennis player, bla, bla, bla, bla, bla, bla, bla.....", even in recent times, futhermore, sometimes Federer has also sung the praises of Serena Williams, even in recent times ( 2016 Oscar Ceremony in LA ) , as a consequence, the logical and immediate question should be:

      "If you have always said that you are clean 100% and you are against doping, how the hell can you appreciate so much these two tennis players on whom there are a lot of doping clues? Especially Nadal, you lost against him a lot of times and you know very well that there are plenty of doping clues concerning his case, how the hell do you behave in that way??"

      Answer:

      There isn't any logical and rational answer to this question, only total silence from online and offline main stream!!

      What a strange coincidence...!!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      1PS "Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication"

      by Leonardo da Vinci

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonardo_da_Vinci

      2PS for example, the same reasoning is true (obviously on a far smaller scale!! ) for Pennetta and Kvitova who have said that Sharapova has just been an absent minded person in the case of "Meldonium Case"!!

      In other words, I never apply double standards, it's inconceivable for me!!





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    21. What should Federer say instead? Something like: "I don't appreciate Nadal, I feel very bad a out all my losses against him because I believe he is doping and I am not". Would you think that would be a more rationale and logical way for Federer to react, instead of singing the praises of Nadal? Something deep down in me tells me that he once said it, not through words, but tears, in Melbourne. That was the moment he realised that he could do nothing about it. In his favor, interviewed today about Sharapova, he repeated that blood samples should be kept for 10 years to be able to test later for newly discovered PEDs. I'm sure Nadal and Djokovic and Serena agree...

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    22. Patience guys. All will be revealed shortly. The guy had knee surgery. If he plays like someone who has had knee surgery over the coming months we will know he's had knee surgery.

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    23. @LiaMarch

      1) One thing is singing the praises of someone, another thing is keeping a neutral and professional approach, another completely thing is being totally frank and open!!

      If you don't understand this very simple and logical concept because you are a Federer's fan, the problem is yours not mine!!

      2)Another thing, as far as "In his favor, interviewed today about Sharapova, he repeated that blood samples should be kept for 10 years to be able to test later for newly discovered PEDs. I'm sure Nadal and Djokovic and Serena agree..."

      Too easy to tell something like that to impress the public opinion given the fact that Federer is towards the end of his tennis professional career!!

      Nadal and S. Williams don't care a fig about it because they are almost at the end of their tennis professional careers as well !!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

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    24. Just a correction!

      Here is the exact sentence I wanted to explain:

      "1) One thing is singing the praises of someone, another thing is keeping a neutral and professional approach, another completely different thing is being totally frank and open!!"

      I missed the adjective "different" in the last part of the sentence!

      Pardon, I was in a hurry!!

      Delete
    25. @Lia

      I forgot one thing!!

      As far as "Something deep down in me tells me that he once said it, not through words, but tears, in Melbourne. That was the moment he realised that he could do nothing about it."

      Just one year and a half ( august 2010) after that particular event ( february 2009 ), Roger Federer and Rafa Nadal can't stop laughing at the tv spot!!

      Here it is:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJV-mF6chSg

      http://www.tennis-x.com/xblog/2010-08-19/5009.php

      Hence, one thing is the personal perception as a fan of a famous athlete, another completely different thing are the facts which say ( by images and words ) something totally different!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      Delete
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    ReplyDelete
  10. Breaking News!!

    Yuliya Efimova Fails Doping Test For Meldonium; Russia Confirms Temporary Suspension

    Russia’s Yuliya Efimova has been caught up in the rampant amount of positive tests for meldonium that has recently taken place among Russian sports stars since the drug moved to the prohibited list this year according to Russian media Sports Express.

    Efimova, who already served a 16-month ban for a positive test for DHEA steroids, could face a lifetime ban after what is being reported to have been an in-competition positive test....

    https://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/news/yuliya-efimova-reportedly-tests-positive-for-meldonium/

    More Info on Yuliya Efimova:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuliya_Yefimova

    Best regards.

    Fabrice

    PS what a strange coincidence...!!

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  11. Nike Is Hinting That Maria Sharapova Could Return to the Fold

    “Each time those situations happen, you are saddened and disappointed. At the same time, there are many athletes that inspire us.” “At the end of the day, athletes are humans just like the rest of us, and they have the same frailties that the rest of us have. And sometimes those moments become teaching moments.”


    http://fortune.com/2016/03/17/nike-maria-sharapova-bounce-back/

    Quotes are from Travis Edwards, NIke's global brand head, and a man tipped to become its CEO one day. This is not surprising, given the egregious resurrection of Nike's commercial relationship with Gatlin, but it still saddens me. Sharapova hasn't even been sanctioned yet, and they are already paving the way for her relationship with them to be restored.

    He may be giving their stance a veneer of conciliation, forgiveness and humanitarianism, but I sense it to be much more Machiavellian at its core. The message is that "We don't really care if you cheated to achieve extraordinary things in sport, we just care that you did excel, so we can get richer on the back of your fame, and you can get richer along with us"...

    You would think that blue-chip brands would not want to be endorsed by individuals perceived as lacking integrity. That was certainly the case with Armstrong. If all athletes found to have cheated to succeed became unendorseable, it would constitute a powerful disincentive to dope, since sponsors are the source of the majority of famous athletes fortunes. Nike are bucking that trend, and sending athletes the message that integrity is irrelevant, and the end justifies the means.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As Pliny the Elder once wrote:

      “Multi famam, conscientiam pauci verentur”

      =

      “Many fear their reputation, few their conscience.”

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pliny_the_Elder

      Question!

      If you asked to Western women and men the following question, imagine that you can choose between two careers as a professional athlete:



      in the first case, you are a super successful athlete with a net worth of about $100Millions but towards the end of your professional sport career you will be caught seriously positive for doping and your professional career will be stained in a negative way for the rest of your life;

      in the second case, you are just a good athlete like many others with a net worth of only about $10Millions but everybody know for sure that you have been always clean from any point of view because it's really true;

      which would you choose?

      70/80% of people would choose to be the professional athlete described in the first case!!

      Just as Pliny the Elder wrote 2000 years ago:

      Many fear their reputation, few their conscience!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      PS in that case you have supposed, you have a very meaningful personal choice:

      don't buy any Nike produt for the rest of your life!!

      Delete
  12. Just a note:

    http://www.latin-dictionary.org/Multi_famam,_conscientiam_pauci_verentur

    Best regards.

    Fabrice

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  13. Just a useful reminder about Nike!!

    It wasn't that long ago that Nike was being shamed in public for its labor practices to the point where it badly tarnished the company's image and hurt sales.

    The recent factory collapse in Bangladesh was a reminder that even though Nike managed to turn around its image, large parts of the industry still haven't changed much at all....

    http://www.businessinsider.com/how-nike-solved-its-sweatshop-problem-2013-5?IR=T

    Best regards.

    Fabrice

    PS personally, I don't buy any Nike product, I prefer to buy from smaller companies.

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  14. Wow, Nadal is so slow right now it's scary... His first serve is 175-180kph and his forehands rarely pass the service line

    When you think that 2-3 years ago he was teleporting on the court and blasting the ball...he definitely toned it down, or even off, this year

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    1. Didn't stop him running over the top of Nishikori.

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    2. Indeed...he was getting thrashed at first (like in their previous meeting), but then Nishikori started playing like crap.

      Even undoped and slow, Nadal is still a really good defender, and can be clutch in decisive moments.

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    3. Nadal may not have the power of his absolute peak of a few years ago but his defensive speed is still ridiculous. Sure, he may not be everything he once was but he is still doped. He always is. That's his game. The former French Sports Minister, Bachelot, was right about him. And despite the bluster from Nadal I am not picking he will be suing her anytime soon. Only another good doper will now beat him at Indian Wells. Cue, Novak Djokervic.

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    4. I'm not sure about that. He's far from Djokovic, Murray, Nishikori or even Federer in terms of pure speed.

      I think his outstanding defense relies on his anticipation, him being really far behind the baseline, and his ability to hit unbelievable passing shots and long, consistent shots on the run (thanks to his muscles gained during his heavy steroid usage).

      You can be sure that he will be vaporized by Djokovic today.

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    5. That would be funny if it weren't so true. Finished watching the match - Djokovic sprinted across the court to chase down a ball, win a point in the dying game of the second set and in that temperature! There is literally nothing stopping this man, its unbelievable.

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    6. You are perhaps forgetting that Nadal defends from further behind the baseline than anybody. Yet he can return as many balls from that far back in the court as many who play closer to the baseline, like Djokovic. It is his counter-attack that has lost some of its sting. But of course he is nearly 30, and in the past the great counter-punchers were well done by then. He has passed his due-by date. Doping will not send him back into his prime.

      Delete
  15. Rugby player banned for 4 years for refusing to provide a sample

    http://www.ukad.org.uk/news/article/rugby-union-player-thomas-price-banned-for-four-years

    UKAD Chief Executive, Nicole Sapstead, said:
    “The message to athletes is clear - when anti-doping authorities request a sample, they must co-operate.”

    Except in tennis....

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    Replies
    1. Tennis player runs into panic room, it's okay. She has a troubled past. Tennis player fakes injury, runs off court, out of building and into waiting car - testers chase after her like idiots. Next week, next tournament, same thing again. Nothing..nada...she has an "injury break" and that's it. It's one of many that just happen and everybody on tour laughs about.

      Delete
  16. WADA declares Spain and Mexico non-compliant with anti-doping code

    http://abcnews.go.com/Sports/wireStory/wada-declares-spain-mexico-compliant-doping-code-37777167

    Big surprise, no?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Was i right in reading that they're excusing Spain because they don't have a sitting government? With Spain's political environment focused on its mass unemployment and austerity are WADA really taking this stance? As for Mexico - i wouldn't be surprised if WADA conducted the whole investigation via skype.

      But what a solution leave the mess in the hands of the sporting federations. who will of course *ahem* do their best to ensure testing compliance in the run up to the Olympics.
      Ban them from competing internationally like they did Russia. They'd sort their house out quick enough after that.

      Delete
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  18. It's tempting to think that doping in tennis is largely confined to the usual suspects debated in these posts. But as professional players become aware that they are unlikely to reach their full "potential" without doping then I would think it will be found everywhere on the tour, at all levels and all styles. Success is everything in the pro game. When I see a player greatly improve his/her court movement, power and consistency at 25, as much as if they were a teenager, then I believe doping will have a part to play. In the past, players in their mid-twenties were not making significant improvements in their game - they had already peaked. Their best years were generally behind them. But not so today. I am reminded of this when I see a player who doesn't usually come up on the radar like Milos Raonic. In the last couple of years his game has leapt away and he continues to simply get better and better. From the cumbersome albatross with only a serve and no backhand he has gotten stronger and stronger, more agile, more consistent, and acquired a much better backhand and a net game. How, I wonder. And why has it all come so late in his career? He is no budding juvenile talent. Borg, McEnroe, Wilander and Chang were done or over the hill at his age.

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    Replies
    1. Of course, with his absolute demolition of Raonic in the final at Indian Wells Djokovic is conspiring to make an idiot of me - unless one also considers that Djokovic is far better at 29 than he was even at 25 (Raonic's age). Peaking late. The new trend in professional tennis.

      Delete
    2. Doping is a factor but there are technical changes that players also make to their game that shouldn't be discounted. The Djokovic of today is technically superior to the one in 2013, which is why he is near unbeatable now and wasn't back then.

      Delete
    3. "I am reminded of this when I see a player who doesn't usually come up on the radar like Milos Raonic"

      Not disagreeing with your overall sentiment, but Milos has been touted as the next big thing in tennis for years now.

      In explaining longer careers and athletes peaking later, you do have make at least some allowance for progress in health an nutrition. Even as late as the eighties tennis players were drinking and smoking and not paying much attention to diet.

      Also, to build the modern sporting physique (without PEDs) can take until your mid-twenties. It can take some body types that long to even just fill out naturally. So even if you were to strip away the doping, it would still be hard nowadays for a wiry 21 year old to compete physically with a seasoned 28 year old.

      Delete
    4. Milos Raonic under the guide of tennis coaches like Riccardo Piatti and Ivan Ljubičić ( best ranking N 3 ATP ) has improved:

      a) his tennis

      b) physically, a strict diet made him lose something like 6-8 chilos.

      Apart from that, he is a regular user of hyperbaric chambers like Djokovic

      ( http://www.wsj.com/articles/tennis-players-get-an-oxygen-fix-1454023796 )

      and in spite of the fact that that latest news

      http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-mouth-guard-that-keeps-milos-raonic-loose-1453746321

      want to make him another "Saint Doping Free",

      in the past and in the recent past ( and why not nowadays? ) Milos Raonic has been the client of the famous Dr. Cotorro, guess what Dr. Cotorro's specialty was?

      Here it is:

      a)a licensed physician for completion of doping control....

      http://www.menstennisforums.com/2-general-messages/228489-doping-tennis-thread-no-accusations-without-proof-wada-ic-report-published-250.html

      ( Read the post that starts with these words:
      Milos Raonic has a SPANISH coach and a SPANISH trainer and SPANISH doctor. It's in the middle of that web page )

      b) "Lower ranked "doping lone wolves", like Kendrick are much more likely to get caught, than is Milos Raonic, who has the best doping doctor in tennis today Dr. Cotorro, whose area of expertise is "doping control"....

      http://tennishasasteroidproblem.blogspot.it/2012/02/doping-control-2009-wta-memphis.html

      ( Read the post written by "Cimber". It's towards the end of that web page )

      c) The description for Dr. Angel Ruiz Cotorro's specialty has been changed from "licensed physician for completion of doping control" to "a specialist in sports medicine ", after a number of internet poster's (myself included).....

      http://forum.cyclingnews.com/viewtopic.php?t=15174

      ( Read the first post of that web page )

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      PS Dr. Cotorro has had a client much mooore famous than Raonic, guess who has been that very famous client..!!
      What a strange coincidence...!!!

      Delete
    5. I'm not suggesting Milos isn't suspicious, just that comparing career trajectory and longevity nowadays with past eras is not a good indicator because, even if one were to assume no doping, careers can still be expected to last longer and the modern player to peak later because of a whole plethora of other factors. Besides, we can also say with some certainty that doping existed in the 70s/80s anyhow - see Chris evert above amongst many other anecdotes - and therefore, PEDs alone can't explain modern career longevity etc.

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    7. @beacontripper

      - So how is the Djokovic of today "technically superior" to the player of 2013? And why should he make those significant technical changes to his game (changes which I don't see) between the ages of 27-29 but not between the ages of 22-24 (which was prior to his going "gluten-free")?

      @northwesterncircus

      - What are the significant changes to diet that make such a dramatic difference to the athlete of today compared to the athlete of thirty years ago? (And, by the way, 34-year-old David Ferrer is a smoker.)

      - How do you know whether the "modern sporting physique" is accomplished without ped's? You are assuming what you are seeing has been accomplished without doping. We certainly know that ped's can enable an older athlete maintain a a physical level that would enable them to compete physically with a younger athlete.

      - What is the "whole plethora of other factors" that can enable careers to last longer and cause a player to peak later? Can you confidently separate those factors from doping?

      - Given that the tennis players of the 70's and 80's bear almost no resemblance to the players of today, what is the evidence of significant ped use in tennis at that time? (I am not talking about other sports in the 70's and 80's, such as track and field, where it is well documented to have been present - as well as being more obvious. Also, the point about the Chris Evert anecdote is that likely dopers in tennis could be virtually identified by their rarity - which is certainly not the case now.)

      I would suggest that the very sophisticated nature of modern doping practices, the incentives to dope - it is virtually a perceived requirement now amongst many athletes and their entourages - coupled with the limitations in testing practices, as well as the known collusion of national and sports governing bodies in allowing doping, will mean that it is likely to be as pervasive in modern sports as any other form of illegitimate practice, such as match-fixing (which we now know is endemic in tennis), and so it becomes difficult if not nigh impossible to distinguish the doped from the clean athete. Nothing may be what it seems. No sport, or individual athlete, can be trusted without qualification. On the other hand, "red flags" suggesting doping can easily be perceived to be present everyhere.

      Delete
    8. @Richard

      The advances in diet, nutrition, training, dealing with recovery; general medical advances, dealing with injuries specifically, physiotherapy advances; an entourage of cooks, fitness trainers, doctors, sports psychologists and all manner of advisors you care to name that were simply not part of the game even 10-15 years ago, let alone 30. Every aspect of the day-to-day life of any elite athlete has been analysed and honed, with advances made in everything from computer analysis of service action to correct sleeping position. Then of course you need to throw in the fact that with every generation we all get a taller and stronger. This is all well documented and easily found on the internet, so no need to go into any detail on a post here.

      That said, of course doping gets you that extra 10%(?) over your rivals and I am as gloomy about its prevalence in tennis as anyone reading. My only real disagreement with you is that I don't think players maturing into their game around mid twenties (provided they have shown early promise and fairly linear improvement) or extending their career into 30s is an obvious sign of doping. In fact, nowadays, for me the opposite would hold true: If a player arrives on the scene ready-built, aged 19/20 and was beating season 28-32 years olds, then I would be highly suspicious.

      Delete
    9. @northwestcircus

      Genetically, we as humans have not changed for thousands of years. We have always depended on proteins, fats and carbohydrates, with essential minerals, to sustain us - which can all be found in readily available foods. We don't need pills for that. Better balanced nutrition has made us bigger and stronger where this was otherwise lacking, but that has applied much less to healthy human beings from affluent societies - which applies to most successful sports men and women in the 20th century. There are other reasons now for why some are bigger or stronger.

      Sure, there have been advances in nutritional understanding, training methods and recovery, but on their own I don't think these will make as dramatic a difference as you seem to think. The tennis players who trained under the legendary Harry Hopman from the 50's to the 70's trained up to six hours a day on court; some (like Laver and Hoad) also did weight-training as well as fitness conditioning. They even slept - like athletes do today.

      Yet they were nothing like the players of the last decade. I would say modern equipment has been the most sigiificant advance. And something else.

      By increasing a naturally gifted athlete's physical capacity - their speed, strength, stamina and recovery - through drugs we are likely to be exponentially adding to their skills in every department. We are not simply enabling them to run faster for longer and to hit harder; in activities subject to such demanding athletic rigours as professional sport now imposes they can be better in almost any way we can conceive of. They are fast becoming supermen. A particular consequence is that a natural decline through aging can be fore-stalled. We are seeing that. Youth is increasingly being made to wait.

      Delete
    10. @Richard, there is more variety to his serve, especially his second delivery. His first serve effectiveness varies a bit, but he generally has improved his trophy position and upward swing a lot. His forehand is more compact and relies a lot more on timing than it used to. Tennis isn't purely about physicality or strength, a lot of it is about feel and mentality. And this generally gets better when you become more experienced. What doping helps you with in this regard is to maintain the physical prowess you need to retain to take advantage of technical developments. I'd advise to watch Djokovic's matches from his younger days and now. His swings on the forehand and serve are different and quite clearly as well.

      Delete
    11. I will add something else to this. A huge component of power in tennis is timing, and this is more true with today's strings and frames. Djokovic is definitely centering more rally balls than he used to, and expending less energy per point except when he has to stretch.

      Delete
    12. I will add something else to this. A huge component of power in tennis is timing, and this is more true with today's strings and frames. Djokovic is definitely centering more rally balls than he used to, and expending less energy per point except when he has to stretch.

      Delete
    13. @Richard, there is more variety to his serve, especially his second delivery. His first serve effectiveness varies a bit, but he generally has improved his trophy position and upward swing a lot. His forehand is more compact and relies a lot more on timing than it used to. Tennis isn't purely about physicality or strength, a lot of it is about feel and mentality. And this generally gets better when you become more experienced. What doping helps you with in this regard is to maintain the physical prowess you need to retain to take advantage of technical developments. I'd advise to watch Djokovic's matches from his younger days and now. His swings on the forehand and serve are different and quite clearly as well.

      Delete
    14. A pro doesn't usually get technically better from 24 to age 29. But if you are comparing Djokovic's technique pre-"gluten-free" with today the improvements he has made are easily attributable to doping. Doping doesn't simply make you stronger, faster and fitter - it can make you better.

      Delete
    15. No I think you're incorrect there. Djokovic had some obvious technical glitches in his game that he has cleaned up. You can't dope your way to shortening forehand swings or changing the trophy position on your serve. I've seen amateurs make corrections to their game well into their 20s. Don't see why a pro cannot.

      Delete
    16. Then why is it that it is only in this generation of players that we have seen them improve as they have passed their mid-twenties? (Forget the amateur experience - they don't count. Pro's have been learning the game since the age of 5 - many of them even younger.)

      Delete
    17. The Djokovic rise to the top of the game is so much bullshit. For years, until the age of 24, he had plateaud as a player. He was a capable if not entirely consistent performer at number three in the world. He didn't look like a future number one. Who then would have picked him to become the player he suddenly became the following year, let alone the colossus he has become at 29? Never in the history of the game has a top player become so transformed so late in his career. Most past number one's showed what they were to become even in their teens - as we saw with the 19 year-old Federer, who beat the greatest grass-court player in history - Sampras - on his "home turf" of Wimbledon in 2001. Federer clearly signalled then who he was and what he could - and did - become. The rise of Djokovic in his own tennis middle (and now old) age - nah, I don't buy it. But millions do. As with everything else about this increasingly crooked game.

      Delete
    18. I am not saying doping hasn't helped. But I have also stated why I think he has improved a lot in terms of the technical game himself. In response to why it is only this generation of players, I'll list the factors:

      1. Doping
      2. Better training facilities and analysis
      3. Better equipment

      Delete
  19. "This could be the year that sport dies of corruption"

    http://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2016/01/this-could-be-the-year-that-sport-dies-of-corruption/

    ReplyDelete
  20. @ Northwestcircus

    Here are two interesting articles about the subject:

    1) The game has become much more physical, with bigger, faster players using technologically enhanced rackets and dealing with once-quick surfaces that have been engineered to play slower. The sport demands a more developed, mature sense of point-building, along with exhaustive training.

    “The rigors of the tour have made for a much longer learning curve for what it takes to be a real professional, physically and mentally,” said Craig Kardon, a longtime coach on the women’s circuit, currently working with the American player CoCo Vandeweghe, a prime example of what he was talking about....

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/29/sports/tennis/young-tennis-players-struggle-to-break-through-on-pro-tours.html?_r=0

    2) The chances for greatness in tennis are tiny and decreasing by the year, as the sport takes root in more places around the globe. The game now demands more athleticism, training and patience from its players, who are becoming champions in their mid-20s rather than late teens.

    The competition is physically and mentally excruciating, and there are no teammates to share the load.

    Then there's the economics of the sport. Players must pay for coaches, physiotherapists, doctors, trainers, racket stringing and travel. Last year, only 58 men on the ATP earned more than $500,000 in prize money. On the women's tour, there were just 37. By contrast, the minimum salary for a major league baseball player is $490,000 this season; in the NBA, it's just under $474,000. In those two sports alone, hundreds of athletes make that and much more; their travel, fitness and medical expenses are also paid...

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424127887324183204578565400657393068

    Anyway, in my opinion, it also depends on the fact that young tennis players started to dedicate their lives to tennis too early and in so doing, most of them are already too much stressed when they are just 18-20, in addition to being mentally immature to be a Pro tennis player!!

    Furthermore, to become a professional tennis player is too expensive and therefore, the most gifted young athletes choose to make a career in other professional sports much less expensive but much more profitable like for example baseball, American football (soccer in Europe), basket!!

    Best regards.

    Fabrice

















    ReplyDelete
  21. Women could boycott Indian Wells over comments - Martina Navratilova

    Martina Navratilova says she would not be surprised if female players boycotted Indian Wells as a result of the row ignited by the tournament's chief executive.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/tennis/35866641

    ReplyDelete
  22. Anyone else feel the reemerging debate on equal pay and the recent reconciliation of Djokovic with the WTA was a PR rouse to cause drama. The primary aim of which was to deflect attention away from drugs and match fixing plaguing them ATM?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No. I just think Djokivic is a tool who is very morally confused.

      Delete
  23. Interesting interview with Federer in The Guardian, in which he discusses doping, his own history and experiences and calls for tougher testing in the wake of the Sharapova positive test.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. At least he's being consistent in his views and calling for retroactive testing. Interesting tho Federers drug tester lives in his village so he knows he'll have a drug test at home lol.

      Delete
    2. At least he doesn't have a panic room.

      And I wonder how often that other guy gets tested in Mallorca.

      Delete
    3. Who needs a panic room when they have an oxygen chamber that keeps him young forever?

      Delete
  24. Hmm... plot thickens (a little)..

    Roger Federer pulls out of comeback match at Miami Open

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/tennis/35901070

    Genuine illness? Or maybe the B sample just came back +ve

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's what was also thinking. Roger says he injured his knee while preparing the bath for his twin girls & needed surgery (arthroscopic?). Doesn't play since his loss in semis @ Aussie Open (where he actually was playing very well until Djoker who makes every top player these days look like a novice) where he also hinted at being injured during or after that match? Now, saying he' ll play Miami only to withdraw last minute with gut issues. This sounds like a pattern we've seen many a time before with certain other top players. Please, Roger, say it ain't so.

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    3. "Or maybe the B sample just came back +ve"

      That means he would have had to have received the results of the A sample within 5 days - 26th January (when he got tested) and 3rd February (when he announced he had undergone surgery)

      Here's what I wrote on a previous post:

      --

      Federer revealed he had knee surgery 5 days after his loss to Djokovic where he would have gotten tested after the match. Is 5 days enough time for the ITF to test his A and B samples and ban him? Not sure.

      In comparison Sharapova received the ITF's verdict on March 2nd (5 weeks after she was tested) and was provisionally banned from March 12th. She did not even ask for her B sample to be tested which would have prolonged the process even further.

      The only way I see Federer's absence on tour being due to a silent ban is if he tested positive at the World Tour Finals (presuming he was tested there) and he had just received the results or he was doped during the Australian Open and he already knew that he would test positive, so he decided to get ahead and pull himself out of tournaments.

      The only problem with that last scenario is if an athlete definitely knows they would test positive, I would think that the athlete would try his/her out-most best to evade the test (just look at Armstrong and Tyler Hamilton and how they evaded tests).
      --

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    4. "Genuine illness?"

      That or his knee not holding up, who knows? He didn't exactly sound too confident in his press conference:

      "Also a lot of testing, making sure the knee does hold up. If I feel something tomorrow, I won't play. It's very simple. Expectations are really low, which is nice for a change. Just see where I am, go out there”

      Was he really going to get through his draw, reach Djokovic and even beat him?

      "Please, Roger, say it ain't so."

      None of these players are above reproach, it wouldn't surprise me if he did indeed test positive prior the Australian Open and is pulling a "Nadal".

      Delete
  25. AS ı said before.They caught Roger and he is going to retire at the end of this year.Unlike popular idea he is the least likely,the guy is biggest EPO adn PED user the game has ever seen.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am not sure anyone can beat our Spanish and Serbian friends on the suspicious doping front. I have however become increasingly suspicious about Federer over the last 18 months or so. At 34 still at the top of the rankings, and taking the likes of Murray apart on a regular basis. Compare and contrast with Leyton Hewitt. Something has not been adding up.

      Delete
    2. I am more suspicious about the Serbian guy. No one in the history of the sport rise to the top the way Djokovic in 2011. This was guy who retired from matches because of physical problems before 2011. He was the champion of retirement.

      Delete
    3. I don't know what you guys think you are seeing that is so suspicious about Federer. So he takes two months off after knee surgery. Big deal. Then he is unlucky enough to get a stomach bug - which will keep him off court for about two weeks. Some "silent suspension". I wouldn't hold your breath that he will make a "Sharapova announcement" any time soon. He hardly has a pattern of suspicious injuries and miracle recoveries in his career. For nearly fifteen years he has been one of the most skilled players ever to have picked up a racquet. But he is not the player he was even only a few years ago; he is not as fast or as powerful or as consistent. If he was he would have beaten Djokovic in some of those recent slam finals where he faced the Serb. Fact: Federer may be still a great player - good enough to hold the three ranking (for now) and beat some of his more inconsistent peers (Murray) but he is still a player in decline. He doesn't look like a doper now and his game hasn't looked like a doper's game at any stage previously in his career. I may be wrong about him, but if you want to build a case that top tennis players are dopers you have to look elsewhere - to Spain or Serbia, I would think.

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    5. @Richard

      “I don't know what you guys think you are seeing”

      Every fan base has their reasoning. I maybe generalising but roughly:

      Djokovic’s fans: “Federer must be doping. There’s no way a 33/34 year old can beat my favourite player who is playing at the highest level Tennis has ever seen without the use of PEDs. Also Federer is playing the best tennis of his career at 34, who does that?”

      Federer’s fans: “Nadal and Djokovic must be doping, look at their sudden improvements in stamina and all the times they beat my favourite in slam finals”

      Murray’s fans: “Djokovic and Federer must be doping. Look at the times when they have continually beaten my favourite player in grand slams. Also, shouldn’t that arrogant and smug 34 year old be retired by now, yet he’s straight-setting Andy in Wimbledon”

      Nadal’s fans: “Djokovic must be doping. He went from retiring from matches to beating my favourite player in 7 consecutive finals including 3 slam finals. Also, Rafa has never taken anything, he works hard”


      All I know is this, looking at their overall career progression if you wrote down a list of indicators/red flags that suggests doping, Nadal and Djokovic will be leading the pack, followed by the other two.

      Delete
    6. Not everyone is coming from a fan bias. A view that some players are more likely to be dopers than others can be supported by arguments that have nothing to do with liking this or that player.

      Delete
    7. Definitely, hence why I mentioned looking at things such as red flags.

      Delete
    8. Richard. Could you shut up for a second with your gibberish?

      Delete
    9. I see you managed to escape from the institution.

      Delete
  26. David Haggerty: "tennis is a clean sport".

    http://www.espn.co.uk/tennis/story/_/id/15064908/itf-president-david-haggerty-maintains-tennis-clean-sport

    "We want to make sure that every single consumer and spectator believes that tennis is a clean sport, because it is"

    He sounds just like Coe... Talking about making people "believe" a sport is clean, as opposed to actually trying to "make" it so.

    ReplyDelete
  27. http://www.irishtimes.com/sport/other-sports/tennis-endures-a-season-of-scandal-from-match-fixing-to-doping-1.2587529

    "If the rigour that was applied by sports journalists to the world of cycling was transferred to tennis, the sport would be in a lot more trouble than it already is."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes. Remember this from Wertheim:

      "We’ll start this week with a story. A few years ago, I was at an event when a player grabbed me by the wrist. “I want to show you something,” she said. She took me to a wall displaying photos of the event’s previous winners. One player had won the event multiple times. Her photos revealed a remarkably -- how to put this? -- evolved physique over the years, the equivalent of before-and-after images of a toning program.

      “There,” the player said. “Now go write about it.”

      The implication, of course, was that the past champion had been doping, and these complementary images were unimpeachable proof.

      It was a jarring sight. But it was a long way from evidence sufficient to accuse a player of doping -- the most serious and damning charge you could level at an athlete.

      [...]

      Time and resources were finite. Like others, I would have my suspicions about this player. But I could not write anything. I would not write anything.

      http://www.si.com/tennis/2014/11/19/wertheim-mailbag-doping-itf-tennis

      Did Wertheim investigate that player, I doubt. After all he wouldn't want to ruffle the feathers of the WTF/ATP/ITF. His livelihood depends on them.

      Delete
  28. Nadal just out to Dzumhur. What the heck is going on?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Retirees in Miami on the ATP side:

      Stakhovsky
      Nadal
      Belluci
      Ram
      Kukushkin
      Monaco
      Federer (Withdrawn)

      Innocent explanation: food poisoning/bug?
      or is it drug testing?

      Delete
    2. Dodig and Bedene also retired.

      Delete
    3. Wtf, as per ESPN (couldn't see the match) 29 year old Nadal had his blood pressure checked before retiring. I guess it comes down to this when you are on some sort of performance enhancing drug cocktail since the age of 16, l-o-l.

      Delete
    4. Miami must be testing & have scared the crap out of several players. If this is really happening, this is a good start as long as it continues. The problem though is transparency---covering up all these players is not helping the sport any. From what I've read, it sounds like Sharapova wanted to out herself by looking so ignorant & managing the press. But if the ITF had their way, she would've just taken a silent ban.
      At this point, the entire sport is very dirty. We can't excuse anyone just b/c we like them just as UntitledK9 stated above. Have to say though, of all the top players, Djoker has figured out how to beat the system by playing & winning all the major tourneys while the rest have to protect themselves from being found out thru withdrawals & injuries

      Delete
    5. I agree with you and richard and untitledk9: everyone's a suspect at this point, but Djokovic, Nadal (and SWilliams) are the three no-doubters out there.

      Delete
    6. Also, early loses by Serena Williams, Wawrinka and Murray (Dimitrov mentioned he's had a stomach virus all week). My guess is, there's something in the water in Miami.

      Delete
    7. Ferrer lost too. So, who's left----Monfils, Raonic, Dimitrov, Nishikori, Simon, Gasquet, Berdych, & non other than Djoker. So, either they're selecting who they're testing or these guys r good at masking what they take & therefore, have no fear. This of course is assuming that most of the top players are playing dirty. Or they just all have much stronger guts than the dropping like flies top players if Miami water is indeed contaminated. LOL!

      Delete
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    ReplyDelete