Monday, March 7, 2016

Maria Sharapova

From the New York Times:

"Maria Sharapova said Monday that she had been notified by the International Tennis Federation that she tested positive for a banned substance at the Australian Open in January..."

Only a few days ago, Sharapova withdrew from Indian Wells due to a forearm injury:

"I am extremely disappointed that I am unable to compete in this year’s BNP Paribas Open,” said Sharapova. “I have been focused on healing my left forearm injury and tried to get my body to be 100% ready to play this event, as it is one of my favorite events on the WTA and so close to my home in LA. I know the tournament will be a great success this year and I will be anxious to return next year and hopefully many years after."

The ITF release [Note that Sharapova was tested on Jan. 26, 2016, after her loss to Serena Williams. Loser-targetted testing continues.]:

TENNIS ANTI-DOPING PROGRAMME STATEMENT REGARDING MARIA SHARAPOVA
7 March 2016
Following the statement made by Maria Sharapova in a press conference today, the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (TADP) can confirm the following:
  • On 26 January 2016, Ms Sharapova provided an anti-doping sample to the TADP in association with her participation in the 2016 Australian Open. 
  • That sample was analysed by a World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) accredited laboratory, which returned a positive for meldonium, which is a prohibited substance under the WADA Code and, therefore also the TADP. 
  • In accordance with Article 8.1.1 of the TADP, Ms Sharapova was charged on 2 March with an Anti-Doping Rule Violation. 
  • Ms Sharapova has accepted the finding of meldonium in her sample collected on 26 January
As meldonium is a non-specified substance under the WADA (and, therefore, TADP) list of Prohibited Substances and Prohibited Methods, Ms Sharapova will be provisionally suspended with effect from 12 March, pending determination of the case.

78 comments:

  1. Will be very interesting to see how the tennis press handles this.

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    1. They'll say it proves the seriousness and robustness of the ITF's testing procedures. That if they are willing to expose one of their very biggest stars like her, everyone else must be clean by exclusion. You just watch...

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    2. Yeah, I've already seen people saying this proves there are no silent bans.

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    3. Despite Sharapova having withdrawn from Indian Wells with an 'arm injury' and some other events beforehand saying similar. Which, as with Cilic, are now shown to have been false.

      Hmm.

      I look forward to the response of the Russian government as well. All part of an Anglophone conspiracy to undermine Russian athletic superiority, no doubt.

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  2. A key issue is if she disclosed this as a prescribed medication on her many doping-control forms over the past 10 years (during which she states she took the drug)... Do we trust the ITF to be honest about this?

    It is correct that the agent was only placed on WADA's banned list from the beginning of this year.

    I'll say it again, as an MD, I personally can think of no reason apart from doping for her to be on that drug.

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    1. If there was a strong medical reason, and this was the genuine oversight being claimed, then there would have been a case for a post-dated TUE, wouldn't there? Which, clearly, hasn't happened.

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    2. Trust me, she would never have legitimately obtained a TUE for that agent..... The drug is for people with severe coronary arterial disease. She is an elite athlete. Does not compute.....

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    3. To quote the Woman herself from her presser "I need it to feel healthy"
      So she will be applying for a TUE for it when she returns from her ban. Right? Right??

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  3. Is it possible that the ITF have been permissive about doping in the past, but are now tightening the reins in the light of the IAAF scandals?

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    1. i'm not in anyway sympathetic toward Sharapova but i tend to believe her when she says she believed it was legal otherwise she would have gotten a TUE on a medical basis (like the long suffering Mattek Sands). There's a reason for catching a top ten player with a failed drug test - which as you know is a rare occurrence. And i'm fairly suspicious of it.

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    2. She just might have failed to realize the agent was recently banned... That doesn't change the fact that I don't believe she had a viable medical reason to take it at any time, nor would she have obtained a TUE for it, especially in the current climate.

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    3. Ok, I looked this up. meldonium improves cardiac function during ischaemia (restriction of blood circulation - sorry not great on medical terminology) so theres the benefit right there. its a little like EPO in a sense of delivering oxygen through the body faster?
      So why is this only banned substance list in 2016 and how widespread is it in Tennis. I wonder will the WADA/ITF look into this next.

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    4. If she's been taking this for 10 years I find it hard to believe this is the first time she tested positive for it. Since it wasn't on the banned list there was nothing they could do.

      This is an Olympic year so I am wondering if that's why the drug was added to the list. Either that or they had a lot of positives from this drug so they decided to finally put it on the list.

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    5. If she's been taking this for 10 years I find it hard to believe this is the first time she tested positive for it. Since it wasn't on the banned list there was nothing they could do.

      This is an Olympic year so I am wondering if that's why the drug was added to the list. Either that or they had a lot of positives from this drug so they decided to finally put it on the list.

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  4. There needs to be a rule about players giving false information to the public. That's an issue that really goes to the heart of integrity.

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  5. I am surprised that the WADA notice period for banning drugs is so short. This drug was legal for years; notice is given December 22 and it's a doping offense on January 1? Seems somewhat lacking in due process to me. And I wonder now, how many other tennis players were taking this drug but not tested or will be getting theraputic use exemptions. I don't think any doping is based on secret formulas...so my guess is that if Sharapova is using this drug, others are as well.

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    1. the notice was given in September:
      "The decision to add meldonium to the banned list was approved on 16 September, 2015, and it came into effect on 1 January, 2016"
      " memo was sent out to athletes by Russia’s anti-doping agency last September informing them of the decision to ban its use"
      From guardian

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  6. I'm certainly hoping this is the pebble that is pulled out of the dyke that lets the water come flooding through on this topic and shows us that at the very top of the game, in women's and men's tennis, the stars are dopers of the highest caliber and, probably, the most sophisticated program that all sports have seen. T

    he massive money at the very top of the sport is far too much of an enticement and the sport's own governing authorities on each side have been able to attract a great deal of positive public attention due to literally a handful of players on each side over the last decade. Without them, tennis would have the mass TV popularity of lawn bowling. And with tennis, since the high profile events are so incredibly expensive and so few in comparison with events in other sports (and also spread across the world, not just in one country or small region like the NBA, MLB, NFL, and soccer to some degree), they rely on TV power and the big names to make people sit on their buts in living rooms all over the world.

    With Sharapova now done and a doper, tennis has just seen an extremely rare event - a supernova. When (other than Agassi, which was honestly not all that surprising) has such a big name in the sport been outed as a cheat?

    Never.

    The definition of a supernova has never been more appropriate in sport. And I'll say that in a brief discussion with an MD I know, she echoes what arcus has said above -- likely no reason for meldonium use other than doping. It's made in Latvia, used in Lithuania and Russia, not approved by the FDA for ANY use in the US and also was implicated in doping cases by a handful of other athletes in other sports, some ice dancing, running, and biathletics.

    Wow. This is as big as it gets, folks.

    I suspect that it is only a short time before news of the truth of silent bans over the last ten or twenty years starts coming out and also before some of the top male and female players, maybe even our current world #1's in each sport, are outed as dopers. Panic rooms and hyperbaric chambers might be good public distractions, but I sniff a hell of a lot more.

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    1. Point of correction: Agassi was not outed as a cheat. He tested positive for crystal meth, which is a recreational drug and is not known as a performance enhancing drug in sports. The point is the potential drug-related scandal was covered up by the tennis authorities. To find someone of that generation outed as a cheat go to 1998 AO winner Petr Korda, who tested positive for a steroid.

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    2. P.S. Agassi "outed" himself - in his autobiography. This is nothing like Sharapova's positive for a banned ped.

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    3. "With Sharapova now done and a doper, tennis has just seen an extremely rare event - a supernova. When (other than Agassi, which was honestly not all that surprising) has such a big name in the sport been outed as a cheat?
      "

      Sharapova hasn't been outed as a cheat. Taking legal PEDs isn't "cheating" and it's almost certain that Sharapova didn't notice that it had been banned this year.

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    4. @Tommy Hass - Lapdog much? If you don't think a corporation the size of Maria Sharapova has a stableful of minders who scrape all rules and regs to make sure she is staying just this side of legal, then you're the dope.

      The testing is likely so thorough that it would have registered positive no matter how little was in her system. And no way in hell would she not have gotten a sniff that this drug was one that WADA was keeping an eye on because of how it has been cropping up on more tests even thought it has not been illegal. Once they see a spike in a certain drugs presence (which they can test for but not punish for), you know that they'll wonder, "hey, why are athletes taking this drug when it is largely for people with severe cardiac issues."

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  7. The irony that she is claiming pre-diabetes as part of the reason to take the drug, while she's promoting Sugerpova, a candy company....

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    1. Well said. It's seems so hypocritical! These athletes are just money making machines not the role models they can be...

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  8. It's an odd case this one.

    Why would an athlete predominantly based in the U.S.A take a prescription drug that's not approved by the F.D.A, but legal in Russia?

    Surely Sharapova can afford the best medical advice and treatment available in the world. Is she claiming that Meldonium was what was recommended to her for the treatment of early stage diabetes?

    Here's what I think happened. Some clever people looked carefully at the I.T.A list of banned drugs and saw that Meldonium, which improves circulation isn't on the list. That was back in 2006 and since then Sharapova takes it. She may well be on other things as well in that grey murky area between banned drugs and drugs available for a variety of conditions it's unlikely an elite athlete would suffer from.

    All goes well until Meldonium is banned as from January 1st 2016. Someone on Sharapovia's team makes a bad mistake and doesn't realise the significance of the ban or tells the wrong people or there's an oversight or something. Then Maria gets unlucky and gets a random drugs test at the Australian Open. And here we are.

    What happens now? Probably nothing more than a six month ban and a host of other tennis players having urgent consultations with their medical teams. But the timing, in the light of all the gambling scandals is rather unfortunate, and the calls for tighter controls and more transparency with tennis anti-doping procedures will increase.

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    1. "Why would an athlete predominantly based in the U.S.A take a prescription drug that's not approved by the F.D.A, but legal in Russia? "

      That is exactly what I was thinking. It seems obvious that this was a drug with known performance enhancing properties that had flown under the radar of the prohibited list and she acquired it through her Russian connections as that is one of the only places it is available. Her regular doctor is almost certainly in the USA and therefore did not prescribe it.

      Given that it wasn't prohibited until this year her career is not thrown into question for me, but the fact that she had a special Russian doctor prescribing her a drug not available to her in the US where she lives does raise questions about her integrity.

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    2. She carefully corrected herself from 'my doctor' to 'my family doctor' in the press conference, mostly because a doctor in a team of a professional athlete is already a rather suspicious character.
      But that raises it's own questions. Like why does she have a family doctor halfway around the world from where she lives? And if she doesn't, and this came from her parents doctor, why was she talking to him rather than her own, rather more local, Medical Practitioner?

      Unless her doctor in the US has been prescribing off-label. This is possible to do in the US even for non-F.D.A. approved drugs, as I understand it. But then her MD would have some hard questions to answer himself. I find it tough to believe this would be the case.


      Much, much more plausible is that she was taking mildronate as a performance enhancing supplement, but regards admitting this as a can of worms she doesn't want opened.

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  9. Russian Tennis Federation boss Shamil Tarpishchev has already leapt to Sharapova's defence, predicting how she will be able to return in time for August's Olymipic Games in Rio de Janeiro........


    "I think that it’s nonsense," the International Olympic Committee (IOC) member told the Tass news agency.

    "Athletes take what their physiotherapists advise them.

    "I believe that Sharapova will still have a chance to play at the Olympics though we will see how things are going to develop."

    You couldn't make it up......

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    1. wow! So a physio prescribed her a heart drug? Um I mean a pre-diabetes drug? LOL. This is comical.

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    2. Find me an instance of a Russian official disliking the truth of a matter and NOT calling it "nonsense".

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    3. "You couldn't make it up......"
      No, but you could set your watch by it.

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  10. They wish it were only that but there's more and it will never come out, here it is:

    http://skimonline.com/forum/showthread.php?51237-Victor-Conte-implicates-Maria-Sharapova-for-doping

    ( there is a video interview with him!! )

    However, high-level professional sports where running too much money is full of doping and then Sharapova is just one of many athletes who have made doping practices; however, the real point is something else:

    why did they hit her who is now almost at the end of her career??

    To give a strong signal to all the other female tennis players that the music will change from now on?

    Retaliations among important and powerful persons within the environment of WTA, ITF, IGM, main sponsors, main bet companies etc..., which ( those retaliations ) are only known within a very small elite?

    The entourage of Sharapova ( obviously Sharapova agreed with them ) has threatened to discredit some important female tennis players of the recent past and those currently in activity who were on doping and are now on rampant doping and in so doing they have been punished very seriously for such a threat?

    Or what else?

    Anyway, really too weird to hit someone like her, given her importance and the fact that she was almost at the end of her career, there must be something underneath !!

    My 2 cents!

    Best regards.

    Fabrice

    PS they say that Meldonium is also used to cover Epo, they say...!!

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  11. Capriati
    "I didn't have the high priced team of drs that found a way for me to cheat and get around the system and wait for science to catch up"

    Ouch....and really?

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    1. Capriati's rants were pretty entertaining to read.

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    2. and she's probably going to live to be a ripe old age. Which is more than I can say for athletes like Maria who take PEDs. It will be interesting to see where she is in 20 years. Taking that drug long-term (when it seems she doesn't have a heart problem) has got to take its toll eventually. In fact, it will be interesting to see where a lot of today's players are in 20-30 years. There is no way long-term PED use won't have its negative affects in the future.

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  12. She's been taking this for 10 years for "medical issues" yet we're just finding out about this now?

    I think the bigger issue is that a good chunk of sports governing bodies have had this on banned lists for years now, but all of a sudden tennis put it on the list. What took them so long? This puts Sharapova's entire career under a shadow. Who knows what else she was taking? Who else in tennis is taking this drug and just had an "Oh shit" moment?

    Sharapova is the biggest cash cow for the WTA outside of Serena. It will be interesting to see if they give her a slap on the wrist or throw the book at her to make an example of her.


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    1. Actually, no. Tennis subscribes to the WADA code, like most pro-sports. WADA only put this substance on the banned list at the start of 2016. So it was legal till the end of December. Her error was testing positive in January.

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    2. You are wrong because it has been a doping practice already known among athletes, here is the smoking gun!!

      "Doping > In Endurance Sports"

      "Meldonium, The New Frontier of Cheaters"

      "Biathlon, cycling and athletics, at least five athletes found positive for doping in recent weeks for drug used to cover EPO, banned from January 1, 2016."

      The drug is a medicine also said Mildronate and is very low cost, available commercially since the eighties, it is available in pharmacies in many countries and it is made exclusively by Grindax, a Latvian company.
      At therapeutic levels, it alters the metabolism, lowers hemoglobin values by improving the fluidity of the blood and therefore acting as possible covering agent of EPO...

      Source:

      https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-6sNZdv69vmw/VtlIRGinHBI/AAAAAAAAdxg/CCrjybTtvTg/s1600/20160303_145720_res.jpg

      It'a an article extracted some days ago by "Gazzetta dello Sport", the most important Italian sport newspaper.

      Here is the online version:

      http://www.gazzetta.it/

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      PS to notice that the headline begins in the following way:

      "Doping > In Endurance Sports"

      and having a very good physical endurance is a crucial factor to become an excellent tennis player, what a strange coincidence....!!


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    3. You can't "dope" if it's legal you doofus.

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    4. You can "dope" even if it's legal, it's called "legalized doping", hence, the problem to be doofus is only yours and not mine!!

      Here is the smoking gun:

      1) October 2015

      Anti-ischemic drug Meldonium has been upgraded to WADA’s banned substances list for 2016, and swimming federations have already started to warn athletes of its coming illegality.

      Meldonium was added to the banned list due to “evidence of its use by athletes with the intention of enhancing performance.”

      Source: https://swimswam.com/blood-flow-drug-meldonium-added-to-wadas-banned-substances-list/

      2) If you go to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) website, you can find their anti-doping code.

      A substance shall be considered for inclusion on the Prohibited List if the substance is a masking agent or meets two of the following three criteria:

      It has the potential to enhance or enhances sport performance;
      It represents a potential or actual health risk; or
      It is contrary to the spirit of sport

      In conclusion, professional athletes ( not amateurs!! ) knew very well that Meldonium could be used as a masking agent ( to cover Epo practices ) and they also knew very well that Meldonium could be used as a performance-enhancing drug that gives him/her an unfair advantage!!

      And obviously they knew all these things long time before October 2015 because they had used it ( among other things!! ) for such purposes above mentioned!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice











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  13. Surely, there are a lot of elite pro-tennis players sweating-it about now!

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  14. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25847280

    To date, substances such as Mildronate (Meldonium) are not on the radar of anti-doping laboratories as the compound is not explicitly classified as prohibited. However, the anti-ischemic drug Mildronate demonstrates an increase in endurance performance of athletes, improved rehabilitation after exercise, protection against stress, and enhanced activations of central nervous system (CNS) functions. In the present study, the existing evidence of Mildronate's usage in sport, which is arguably not (exclusively) based on medicinal reasons, is corroborated by unequivocal analytical data allowing the estimation of the prevalence and extent of misuse in professional sports. Such data are vital to support decision-making processes, particularly regarding the ban on drugs in sport. Due to the growing body of evidence (black market products and athlete statements) concerning its misuse in sport, adequate test methods for the reliable identification of Mildronate are required, especially since the substance has been added to the 2015 World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) monitoring program. In the present study, two approaches were established using an in-house synthesized labelled internal standard (Mildronate-D3 ). One aimed at the implementation of the analyte into routine doping control screening methods to enable its monitoring at the lowest possible additional workload for the laboratory, and another that is appropriate for the peculiar specifics of the analyte, allowing the unequivocal confirmation of findings using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry (HILIC-HRMS). Here, according to applicable regulations in sports drug testing, a full qualitative validation was conducted. The assay demonstrated good specificity, robustness (rRT=0.3%), precision (intra-day: 7.0-8.4%; inter-day: 9.9-12.9%), excellent linearity (R>0.99) and an adequate lower limit of detection (<10 ng/mL).

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  15. I know no one wants to hear this including myself, but Roger also has withdrawn from Indian wells etc. until the clay court season. He cited an injury that suddenly appeared after his Aussie open beating by Djoker. So, the Aussie open might have meant business in the testing arena this year. what it looks like to me is that Sharapova is being used as a scapegoat so that the ITF can show off that they r being so tough on top famous players. In the meanwhile, giving a pass to whoever they want behind the scenes. If I were Sharapova and the ITF is soo harsh to me on the suspension, I would say screw it lemme expose all the other top players so they go down with me. We all know ITF won't allow this, so they'll cut some kind of deal behind the scenes with her.

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    1. If Fed is doping, he's going to need better dope to beat Dopovic. Maybe he should have tweeted a photo of himself in the hospital bed, which so many tennis players do when they're having surgery. Although even then, the conspiracy theorists would say it was photographed on the set of Grey's Anatomy. :D

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    2. Sharapova still has to think about her endorsement career. Money is money after all. No one is going to want to hire a whistle-blower to hawk tennis gear, especially when she would be single-handedly bringing the sport to its knees.

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    3. @Hola

      Yep, I agree. I also would like to see Sharapova co-operate and implicate other top players,I'm sure any serious sports publication will be happy to print that story. But I doubt she would.

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  16. Martina navratilova "Sharapova Announces That She Failed Doping Test, -hope this gets cleared up as it seems 2 me to be an honest mistake"

    Philip Cumberlidge GP "how can it be a honest mistake to take an anti-anginal medication when you clearly don't need it for that?"

    Martina Navratilova "clearly I don't know what I am talking about- so I will stop saying someone is or is not guilty."

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    1. "Philip Cumberlidge GP "how can it be a honest mistake to take an anti-anginal medication when you clearly don't need it for that?"

      Is this guy dumb? Obviously she took it to improve performance. The honest mistake is to assume that it's still legal.

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    2. No, he isn't dumb. He is asking a rhetorical question, expecting you to draw out exactly the implication from it that you have done.

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  17. yes, like Djokovic who made an astounding improvement in 2011.... gluten free? or perhaps, meldonium.... Sharapova made a big improvement on clay in 2011 as well... and improved her stamina in 3 set matches. I would be surprised if she was taking meldonium back in 2006... more recent than that I would think.

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    1. Why would she lie to claim she had been taking a dubious substance for much longer than she really has? That makes no sense.

      Maybe she found another 'supplement' in 2011 to go alongside the mildronate?

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    2. Yes, true. It would be strange to claim she had been taking it for longer, I read an article which said meldonium started to be used about 5 years ago, but that doesn't mean others were not taking it earlier....

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  18. It is really odd.
    WADA send emails to atheletes with an update of the banned substances on 22nd of december 2015 effective on 1st January 2016.

    What if she took the drug on New years eve for the last time?
    It would have been definitely in her system in January the 1st or maybe even the 10th.

    For me it looks like she hadn't had a TUE for that. Why? Don't know. Probably the drug is hard to find outside of Russia...
    If she had a heart condition or diabetes I'm sure there are hundreds of other meds she could have taken. But no. Apparently she wanted it to be a secret.

    I also think she already made a deal. She already talked to ITF, her sponsors and WTA. That charade of a press conference was part of it.

    Look at the documentary I posted earlier
    http://www1.wdr.de/fernsehen/sport-inside/sendungen/doping-russland-104.html

    pic.twitter.com/LMyptRCfAm

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  20. Jennifer Capriati has lost it over Sharapova's failed drug test.

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    1. She seems to have gone off the deep end. It's hard to see her as anything other than a subject of pity.

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    2. Yeah - it was only doping, after all.

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  21. She's already been dropped by Nike (who are still paying Gatlin)........

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  22. Oh dear me. It couldn't have happened to a nicer player as well, HA!.
    So basically she has been legally taking a performance enhancing drug for the last 10 years, finally WADA has caught on and banned the substance but Sharapova & her team have seriously dropped the ball by failing to notice the change in rules.

    I'm sure she will argue medical exemption but you have to question why is she taking a medication that isn't even legal in the US and many other western countries (i.e. where she spends nearly all of her time), but is instead going to some obscure Russian doctor to get this stuff. Legal or not the whole thing stinks.

    I wonder if we will finally see some investigation into Djokovic's incredible powers of recovery or the fact that half the women on the tour could be mistaken for heavy weight boxers.

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  23. This reminds me of the US Open she won in 2006 when some people noticed in a changeover that after drinking from two different water bottles she then went into her bag and pulled out a strange little bottle and took a swig from it. Some people speculated that it was some sort of stimulant due to how she appeared during and right after that match, as if her pupils were dilated. You can see it in this video here at about the 1:22 mark, but unfortunately this does not have the closer camera angle that was shown on the US broadcast where you could see that it was a small bottle that looked almost like some sort of medicine https://youtu.be/f9xLwzE_otI

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  24. So much Medically ill informed misinformation here. This substance will not improve blood circulation in a healthy person. It does agonize PPAR-alpha and delta, (as do several pills I can buy at any healthfood stoore) which slightly improves recovery and endurance, but only if one works like mad training. A case can be made for its use for mildly elevated blood sugar.

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  25. So much Medically ill informed misinformation here. This substance will not improve blood circulation in a healthy person. It does agonize PPAR-alpha and delta, (as do several pills I can buy at any healthfood stoore) which slightly improves recovery and endurance, but only if one works like mad training. A case can be made for its use for mildly elevated blood sugar.

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    1. Okay, so I get it, in your opinion there is no reason for it to be a prohibited substance under the WADA Code!

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  26. The substance is performance enhancing. That is why Sharapova has used it. It is also why WADA has now banned it. It confers unfair advantage. In terms of her liability under the Code, it is immaterial whether Sharapova knew of the ban. Her only defences would be a flaw in the testing (not contested) or ingested inadvertently (the "contaminated beef" argument - not argued). So she faces penalty. Her claim of ignorance (however unlikely) is therefore only public relations. From some of the views expressed here and elsewhere, it is working.

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  27. I hate the predictable course this is taking. Maria Sharapova is now the devil. Let's focus on giving her the most extreme punishment possible. And then let's pretend that we are sending a message and the conversation is over.

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    1. You prefer the reaction of her apologists, of which you appear to be one?

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  28. I am just curious: Why did Sharapova go public? Was someone threatening to expose her? She didn't have to. I'm pretty sure silent bans do exist. So why didn't she just try to cover it up? Unless she's going to try and get a retroactive TUE. Any ideas on this?

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    1. She's trying to control the narritive. There's a BBC article which breaks down the careful media management. The whole thing is really rather cynical. http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/tennis/35754677

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    2. Thank you very much for the link!!

      Great Job!! Congratulations!!

      All the best! Fabrice

      Delete
  29. The amount of sympathy on display for Sharapova is ridiculous. Can you imagine if Williams had been caught doping? Do you really think former players and the media would be say 'oh poor Serena, she made an honest mistake'.

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  30. Sympathy for her is in short supply in the UK media. Focus on the 10 years use of a legal PED rather than the "error" of missing the email. Fellow tennis players are focussing on missing the updated list. That's safe and won't bring into question any legal supplements/stimulants they have been taking!! I suspect a fair few players will have even been using the same drug and many more will be using similar "medicines" and have a list of TUEs! When people focus on the "mistake" rather than the drug itself, it speaks volumes IMO

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  32. As the use of Steroid increases day by day, the need for sources of information on steroids is rapidly increasing. In this respect, our site aims to inform the athletes about steroid use as best we can, as they are well aware of the problems that may arise after the unconscious use of steroids. While those who log in to my site can easily review the product they want on my site, they also display the best cursors they can get according to their needs. On this side, it is very similar to the sports, as well as the cure and research and the use of steroids. After this process, development process can be followed easily.

    Our site offers a safe shopping opportunity from the time it was set up to serving people who are considering buying steroids. Our company, which sells all products recommended in the steroid industry, constantly offers the best prices on the easiest conditions at this stage. It is enough for the customers who can buy steroids by credit card or bank transfer method to decide which product they are going to use. In addition, discounted prices will be offered to our customers who will receive products in a wholesale manner, so that all opportunities will be provided to the athletes. If there are people completing their shopping on our site until 14:30 noon, the products they receive are delivered to the cargo on the same day. This means that the products will be delivered on the next day or second day, even if they depend on the city.

    While all of our products are offered in categorized form on our site, after selecting products from these categories, people will be able to use credit cards together with private security systems. When credit cards are used, the information to be given is definitely not seen by any person, but they are directly directed to the bank's page to make purchases. In this way, customers will be able to reply to our site easily while they are in contact with our phone numbers and e-mail addresses. Thus, the problems that arise will be immediately solved in favor of our customers and the best contribution to our customers' sports will be given.

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