Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Sharapova

Well, here's something significant:

"The Latvian company that manufactures meldonium says the normal course of treatment for the drug is four to six weeks -- not the 10 years that Russian tennis star Maria Sharapova says she used the substance."

114 comments:

  1. anything else? isn't all clear now? cheater. just as many other in the tour.

    ReplyDelete
  2. There has been speculation over the length of her ban but without recourse to this essential medicine surely a return to playing would jeopardise her health?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If it were essential she could get a TUE. But first she'd have to prove it is essential.

      Delete
  3. There has been speculation over the length of her ban but without recourse to this essential medicine surely a return to playing would jeopardise her health?

    ReplyDelete
  4. I see 2 key aspects to this situation, one technical and the other reputational.

    From a technical point of view, this will play out in the usual way.. AAF, ADRV, mitigating factors argued at ITF tribunal (and then presumably CAS), followed by a period of sanction, which I expect to be 1-2 years, depending on how effective the attack on her medical evidence is)... In a post IAAF/Russian scandal world, and after the ITFs own betting woes, a perception of leniency would be bad for them, IMO.

    The reputational aspect is different. It will come down to whether the public and sponsors believe she had a valid medical reason to take the PED, whether legal or not at the time of ingestion. Since most people will lack the medical knowledge to make accurate conjectures in this regard, it's going to come down to the quality of the press reporting, vs. the effectiveness of her PR machine.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  6. "Why Maria Sharapova does not deserve sympathy"

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/tennis/2016/03/08/why-maria-sharapova-does-not-deserve-sympathy/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And a BBC deconstruction of the media management strategies behind her announcement:- http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/tennis/35754677

      Delete
  7. https://ewanmackenna.wordpress.com/2016/01/28/bribery-guns-mafia-prostitution-tennis-has-them-all-covered/

    Ewan MacKenna is a great sport journalist.

    ReplyDelete
  8. My question is: is it normal, that we learned about failed test from an athlete? I think that we should hear it from some authorities from ITF, WTA or Tennis Australia. Test took place about 6 weeks ago...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ITF policy is that they don't announce adverse analytic findings before their tribunal has concluded its investigation, and decreed that the athlete has committed an anti-doping rule violation. Bad policy, IMO, but that is their stance.

      Delete
  9. According to Lindsay Davenport, Sharapova did disclose Meldonium on the doping-control forms, including her form at the Aus Open.....
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MkHv-3a5vc

    That will work in her favor...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, she didn't really cheat at all. Not really. Or just a little bit. Right?

      Delete
    2. It just shows how premeditated it was.

      Delete
  10. Notice Serena out there quick to defend her doper comrade. Just call her Maria Sharadopa. Some day there will be the equivalent of Jose Canseco's baseball book spilling the beans on this total joke of a juice era in tennis.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The whole thing is rich in ironies. To see Sharapova defended by the Queen of the Panic Room. Sharapova should have learned to hit the floor. Works every time.

      Delete
    2. Naw, she should have just said she was afraid of needles, or peeing in a cup.

      Delete
  11. Going from catching minnows to the white whale and their still skipping the point entirely. now the Tennis PR machine has kicked into action headed by WTA's own snow white Wozinaki. Sitting in a press conference and bleating about about she double checks her medicines making sure there not on banned list. With Serena's beside her nodding along in agreement,
    https://uk.sports.yahoo.com/video/always-double-check-medication-wozniacki-180749935.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can tell you that when I was in my 20's, in my prime, I was on zero prescription drugs. Why are these elite athletes on so much crap? Seems ironic to me. Here they are in the best shape of anyone yet they are on all sorts of medications. Makes one stop and ponder the B.S.

      Delete
  12. Ironically, Hajo Seppelt (who exposed the Russian doping scandal with the help of the Stepanovs) focused on Russian Athletes doping with meldonium in his latest documentary, which aired on Sunday March 6th.

    http://www.ardmediathek.de/tv/Sport-inside/Doping-top-secret-Russia-s-red-herrin/WDR-Fernsehen/Video?bcastId=1493328&documentId=33986064

    From 6 minutes...

    ReplyDelete
  13. Porsche, Nike and Tag Heuer have suspended association with Sharapova...

    Evian, though, apparently not ready to jump ship.... I guess they feel she needs something fresh and pure to wash her pills down with :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Major kudos to this blog which pinpointed the scale of cheating in tennis before this story broke.

    ReplyDelete
  15. My friend had a good theory with this- she reckons that this is part of the bigger picture with Americans squeezing the Russians.

    For example recently we heard all this stuff about Russian's systematically doping in athletics, but that ignores the fact that top American athletes are almost certainly doping on a regular basis.

    Shara almost certainly was thrown under a bus, a sacrificial lamb if you like. They should be going after those who have been winning a lot lately, but instead fudge the ball by going after someone who's career was on the slide recently and hasn't won anything of consequence of late.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well the Olympics are coming up this summer. How convenient for the Americans if they can get rid of their biggest competition in advance. Since it's mostly eastern Europeans and Russians using the now-banned drug. Of course I'm being facetious but it would make for a good thriller.

      Delete
    2. Don't complicate matters. She failed an IQ test, end of. Nobody is throwing anybody under buses.

      Delete
  16. Maria Sharapova's failed drugs test was "reckless beyond description", according to former World Anti-Doping Agency president **** Pound.

    "You are taking something on a list. I am sorry, that is a big mistake - of course she should have known," said Pound, who was head of Wada from 1999 to 2007. She is taking something that is not generally permitted in her country of residence [USA] for medical purposes, so she says, so there must be a doctor following this. Anytime there is a change to the list, notice is given on 30 September prior to the change. You have October, November, December to get off what you are doing. All the tennis players were given notification of it and she has a medical team somewhere. That is reckless beyond description."
    "A drug like this over a long period of time is contraindicated. It means you would not take it over a long period of time. That is why there was an urge to put the drug on the list. A lot of people were taking it for performance enhancing. Most of the drugs of choice for dopers were built for therapeutic reasons - like EPO and others. That was supposed to regenerate blood if you had cancer treatment or surgical intervention if you needed to increase blood supply. Someone has said: 'Hmm, more oxygen in the blood? Hmm, very interesting. Let's see if we can use it for that purpose."
    "There is a side effect to every drug, somebody must be monitoring this."

    http://www.bbc.com/sport/tennis/35757814

    ReplyDelete
  17. Professor Sandro Donati:

    "Meldonium improves physical performance"

    Meldonium, the drug taken by Maria Sharapova, facilitates blood circulation and therefore it is indicated for the treatment of ischemia, but it can also be used as an adjunct with other medicines to treat diabetes, as explained by the Siberian tennis player. Which advantages can it lead to an athlete? Generally speaking, it favors your abilities during physical exercise, it gives you that something extra. "



    " WADA has placed this drug under observation for some time now and it has been added to the list of prohibited substances since January. Sharapova said that she had used it for diabetes? If she really suffers from this disease, she must have indicated it. Because athletes must declare all medications they use, no matter if they are allowed or prohibited. It is necessary to indicate the use and it is also necessary to exhibit the therapeutic exemption: there is a medical commission which will assess the actual needs and, if so, authorizes you to use the medicines in the right proportions. If Sharapova has followed the correct procedure, she could get by with a reduced suspension, maybe a year. " What would happen, however, if Sharapova had not declared to suffer from diabetes? "The situation will complicate - concludes Donati - and the Russian tennis player would risk a long stop. Certainly her defense before the organ judging will be conditioned by the statements made at the press conference, in particular by the admission of taking the drug for several years (since 2006) for diabetes problems: at this point she will necessarily have to prove having declared the disease in previous inspections, or she may be sanctioned with a long stop ".

    Source: http://www.sportface.it/tennis/sandro-donati-su-maria-sharapova-meldonium-migliora-prestazione-fisica/10325

    Who is Professor Sandro Donati:

    Current coach of Alex Schwarzer ( walker ) and Wada consultant, the World Anti-Doping Agency.
    He is mostly known for his battle against doping in athletics, soccer and cycling and for denouncing Italian scandals athletics occurred in the mid-1980s.
    Author of several books about doping, he was also Head of Research and Experimentation of Italian National Olympic Committee from 1990 to 2006.
    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandro_Donati

    Best regards.

    Fabrice

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandro Donati, attuale tecnico del marciatore (e 'dopatore') Schwazer. Tanto ironico, no?

      Delete
    2. What are you saying??

      Your irony is a totally stupid thing because you don't know the story about this case and you even write in broken Italian, for example "Dopatore" in Italian means the
      doctor who runs the doping practice for a professional athlete , from experiments on his own in his laboratory or through other persons in other laboratories to the direct administration of the doping substances, etc......!!



      Anyway, here is the real story!!

      I had already reported about the meaning of the new professional relationship between Professor Sandro Donati and Alex Schwarzer in this following past post:

      http://tennishasasteroidproblem.blogspot.it/2016/02/2015-itf-anti-doping-statistics-per.html

      In particular, there is a passage ( point 4) ) of my post that says:

      " 4)If the top tennis players keep on saying that they are clean sport professionals, why don't they give up the "Time Slot" ( above mentioned ) as Alex Schwarzer has already made it?

      Updates about Alex Schwarzer:

      Former Olympic champion, Alex Schwarzer, disqualified for using illegal substances will train with Professor Sandro Donati, the Italian hero of anti doping, Schwarzer will move to Rome ("but for Professor Sandro Donati I would have gone to Siberia"), he'll pay on his own a large part of the expenditure and give up the time slot of the day when an athlete can be controlled (also part of the controls surprise). Then, through a series of periodic and rigorous blood tests, will be built a "monitoring with even tighter modalities of the biological passport of Wada".

      Source:
      "Alex Schwarzer, after doping, relies on anti doping guru. To win again"

      http://www.ilfattoquotidiano.it/2015/04/01/alex-schwazer-dopo-doping-si-affida-guru-dellantidoping-per-tornare-vincere/1557299/

      In other words, if the top tennis players don't have anything to hide, why don'y they give up the time slot??

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      1PS the usual and most logical answer:
      "Turkeys don't vote for Christmas"
      2PS the real scandal is also that there isn't any sport journalist in the whole world who is able to ask an evident question like that!!

      Shame on them!! "

      End of my past post I've just mentioned!!

      As a logical consequence, any person can say that Professor Sandro Donati is doing an excellent job with Alex Schwarzer who is by now an execellent example of sport virtues against any kind of doping practices!!

      These are Facts not ironic opinions of a disappointed fan of Maria Sharapova like you!!

      Adios!!

      Fabrice

      Delete
  18. Obviously, Professor Sandro Donati was also interviewed about the Lance Armstrong case:

    Interviewees who agreed to be named in the report

    The committee interviewed 174 people including at least 25 riders. These are the main ones:

    Sandro Donati – leading Italian anti-doping activist, author of a key report into EPO use in the professional peloton in 1992

    Source: http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/mar/09/lance-armstrong-uci-colluded-circ-report-cycling

    Best regards.

    Fabrice

    ReplyDelete
  19. While I'm a big fan of tennis, it is the only sport in my life I have followed as a fan. All others have had far too much corruption for my taste. While I'm disappointed in this incident, I am not surprised one bit and actually kind of welcome it.

    It is time for sportspeople the world over to be tossed aside as any type of role models for young people. Scientists, thinkers, activists, people who make true change ---- these are the people whom I have held up to my kids as laudable. This last part of my fandom personage is now gone, and I am glad to rid myself of this addiction.

    I am very hopeful that this house of cards in women's tennis exposes the likeliest biggest doper in history - Serena Williams and in the men's game throws light on Rafa (duh) and Djokovic (another duh). Even if it exposes my idol, many people's idol, Federer, so be it.

    Professional sports is a complete fraud -- we are all here to support these multimillionaires hitting balls and it really is, when you think about, truly a stupid activity for fans to engage in. Life is far too short. I welcome the downfall of tennis. I firmly believe in truth setting humans free on a truly existential level. It is time for this to happen in tennis and I hope people who know about Serena, Rafa and Djoko (and others) are encouraged to now come into the open to show that we've all been fed deceit and lies.

    ReplyDelete
  20. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Deceit and lies? Isn't that what it takes to succeed - at anything - now? Perhaps they are perfect role models, after all. They are what we would be.

      Delete
    2. 1) Everybody wants to be famous and success is always measured in money. If you are not making money out of what you are doing, you are no good. On the other hand if you are making money even from not so moral activities, you are treated as a king. Having a small cigarette kiosk on the street is considered a low life, while being the CEO of Philip Morris is highly respected, even though in both cases the money comes from the same place.

      2) “We buy things we don't need, with money we don't have, to impress people we don't like"
      by Edward Norton in “Fight Club”.

      As a logical consequence, if things keep on working in this way, cases like "Sharapova Meldonium" will always be just a very small tip of a gigantic iceberg!!!

      Best regards

      Fabrice

      PS anyway, it isn't my case because if they asked me:

      "What would you prefer to be:

      a) a champion of natural body buiding and fitness with a net worth of about $10Millions like Tony Horton.

      or

      b)a world champion of body building on steroids and a movie star with a net worth of about $450 Millions like Arnold Schwarzenegger ?

      Without any doubt, I would choose a career like Tony Horton, for me, people like Arnold Schwarzenegger ( obviously, there are a lot of persons like him in several professional fields: from finance to show business!! ) are a total fraud!!

      Money can't buy a lot of things:

      http://www.inc.com/lolly-daskal/50-things-money-can-t-buy.html

      Delete
  21. There is an enjoyable side to this. It is surely entertaining to watch a vastly inflated corporate swindle, that is the modern professional sport of tennis, struggle to salvage its reputation.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Swindlers, you said it. I loved this piece on how Djokovic was allowed to undermine a respected medical professional to shore up his doper mate, Troicki, drawing, in the process, an unfavourable comparison with, of all sports, football!

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/tennis/10453488/Novak-Djokovics-comments-in-wake-of-Viktor-Troicki-ban-prove-that-the-tennis-family-is-too-dysfunctional.html

      Delete
  22. Gotta be a lot of other non-banned drugs out there. How come the cyclists are all able now to strip away torso weight to the point of emaciation while maintaining lower body power and endurance? What's the peleton up to now?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There's some info about other drugs here http://roidvisor.com/performance-enhancing-drugs-used-by-elite-athletes-that-are-surprisingly-legal/

      Delete
    2. I wonder what miracle cocktail Venus Williams is on seeing she has overcome the ailments of Sjögren's syndrome to compete at her current level at 35 yrs old.
      At wuhan last year she was unstoppable. not even the chronic fatigue that goes hand in hand with her condition was able to stop her.

      Delete
    3. Oh it is truly a weak era. LOL.

      Delete
    4. Forgot about the weak era :)

      Delete
  23. A point that is being over-looked - especially by those who seek to defend Sharapova - is that the use of the drug was always a form of cheating. It is a drug devised for medical purposes but has been used by Sharapova and others not in the manner intended but to gain an unfair competitive advantage. That is why it has now been banned. That she failed to heed the ban, despite more than adequate warning, was indeed "reckless beyond description" (Richard Pound), but that is probably what it now takes to catch the cheats - a slip-up of staggering proportions. I wonder what many tennis fans would think if it was revealed that Nadal, Djokovic, or even Federer had at some point used meldonium to improve their physical performance?

    Of course the issue is being reported as though Sharapova will only be an "outlier" in terms of being a doper. However, if the drug has now been banned because its use has become prevalent then it must be assumed that a significant number of other players have followed her path while yet heeding the latterly-imposed ban. The general picture is therefore of athletes who will look for any advantage and anti-doping authorities who lag far behind in catching up with them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly, the question I would like answered is why the WADA allowed a drug known to them for performance enhancing benefits to be legal substance for athletes - considering Sharapova has been using this unperturbed for 10 years. Also I've heard seven other Russian athletes have tested positive for this in the past month also. So it begs another question is this solely a Russian problem considering its easy both online and delivered to countries where unavailable on prescription?

      Delete
    2. So if use of the drug is as widespread in tennis as Dick Pound alleges, cheating is widespread as well. Unless tennis has a case of infectious heart disease and diabetes.

      Delete
  24. The amount of sympathy on display for Sharapova is ridiculous. Can you imagine if Williams had been caught doping? Do you really think former players and the media would be say 'oh poor Serena, she made an honest mistake'.

    If she really had a health problem why isn't she seeing a doctor in the country where she lives (USA) and being prescribed a drug that is approved in that country? The whole think stinks.

    However one cannot deny that Maria is very smart in the way she has gone public with this - very slick PR operation going on. A normal ban would be 2-4 years but I bet she gets away with a slap on the wrist and is still able to play the Olympics this year. A lesser player would be made an example of and have their whole career trashed.

    ReplyDelete
  25. So much excitement here for the catch of a small fish. Sharapova is famous for her good looks and horrible sounds, nothing else. I want to see a big one exposed, give me Serena, Rafa, Novak, that's when I'll celebrate

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sharapova - 5 time GS champion, world no 7, highest earning female athlete. After Serena she is probably the most recognisable faces and biggest crowd pullers the WTA have. How you can class her as 'small fish' I don't know!

      Delete
    2. Although I would love to see Novak exposed.... I think many people feel there is dirt there somewhere. The way he transformed from flaky talent with breathing issues to superman with the aid of a special diet only is just incredible.

      Delete
    3. Sharapova is not a small fish as a player, but the accusation is to have swallowed one pill too much after it got banned. I want someone to expose the sophisticated and scientific doping regimes over many years that have made Nafal win everyone of his titles, and I want him stripped of the trophies like Armstrong was. Same story could go with Serena and Novak.

      Delete
    4. Here it is!!


      1) "Run, Swim, Throw, Cheat: The science behind drugs in sport" Paperback – September 15, 2013
      by Chris Cooper


      Drugs in sport are big news and the use of performance-enhancing drugs in sport is common. Here, Chris Cooper, a top biochemist at the University of Essex, looks at the science behind drugs in sport. Using the performance of top athletes, Cooper begins by outlining the limits of human performance. Showing the basic problems of human biochemistry, physiology, and anatomy, he looks at what stops us running faster, throwing longer, or jumping higher. Using these evidence-based arguments he shows what the body can, and cannot, do. There is much curiosity about why certain substances are used, how they are detected, and whether they truly have an effect on the body. Cooper explains how these drugs work and the challenges of testing for them, putting in to context whether the 'doping' methods of choice are worth the risk or the effort....


      2) Drugs in Sport 6th Edition
      by David R. Mottram (Editor), Neil Chester (Editor)

      Key topics include:

      a)Mode of action and side effects of each major class of drugs used in sport

      b)Discussion of cutting-edge issues such as gene doping and athlete biological passports

      c)The latest doping control regulations of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA)

      d)Issues surrounding non-prohibited substances and ergogenic aids in supplements

      e)Medical and pharmaceutical services at major sporting events

      f)An assessment of the prevalence of drug taking in sport

      Accessibly written, extensively referenced, and supported throughout with illustrative case studies and data, Drugs in Sport provides a comprehensive, objective resource for students and researchers, athletes, sports scientists and coaches, journalists, sports administrators and policymakers.



      Enjoy the reading!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      Delete
  26. Of course they won't expose Novak, don't be ridiculous. It's a pipe dream. He's a cash cow for the tour.

    ReplyDelete
  27. IF Nadal was doping he won't be exposed now....... he has gone in to decline and is not a significant player any longer. He is entering the stage where people get all nostalgic about his past performances, rather than analysing how ridiculously implausible they were.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Vogue magazine talking doping in tennis. Wow!

    http://www.vogue.com/13413611/maria-sharapova-doping-banned-drug-retirement-meldonium/

    ReplyDelete
  29. "The chair of Grendiks’ board of supervisors, Kirovs Lipmans, is also president of the Latvian Hockey Federation and an executive member of the Latvian Olympic Committee. His dual role as a Latvian sports official and director of a company that produces a performance-enhancing drug raised eyebrows with at least one US anti-doping official. “It’s weird,” says the official, on background."

    lol

    http://www.wired.com/2016/03/meldonium-became-doping-drug-choice/

    ReplyDelete
  30. The Times is reporting that all players "received five warnings" last year not to use meldonium. There goes the "I forgot to click on the email" excuse. The continued use of the drug by Sharapova, despite the repeated warnings, shows she wasn't prepared to give it up. The slip-up was with the masking agents.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I see from earlier comment in the thread that Sharapova may have declared her use of the drug at the AO. That would be surprising, as it appears its detection was through a positive test result. Either way, it shows wealth and brains don't necessarily go together. But we knew that with Donald Trump.

      Delete
    2. All athletes selected for doping controls are required to list all the medications they take (banned or legal) on the doping control form, as well as all the supplements they use ..

      Lindsay Davenport had a private meeting with Sharapova and her lawyer after her press conference, and afterwards said that she understood Sharapova had declared Meldonium on prior forms and on the form at the Aus Open.

      This was not confirmed in later communication with her lawyer

      "Sharapova, like some other veteran players, was already looking at 2016, which includes the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, as a potential endgame. A two-year ban would keep her out of the sport until early 2018, which might be too long to keep the internal flame alight, particularly in view of her recurring injuries.

      But her legal team intends to argue for a much shorter suspension, and the feeling in the Sharapova camp Tuesday was that a ban of one year or less was achievable.

      “That would be the first thing I [[a sports lawyer interviewed for the article]] would counsel her to do, is to apply for a retroactive T.U.E.,” he said. “It’s a tough standard to meet, a much harder standard than a forward-going T.U.E., but I’ve had a case in the past where that happened, and I’ve gotten retroactive T.U.E.s. that have wiped out adverse analytical findings. It’s not impossible.”

      John Haggerty, Sharapova’s lawyer, was asked about that possibility. “Maria and I are looking at all our options,” he said. He also declined to comment, citing confidentiality, on whether Sharapova had listed meldonium, which is also known as mildronate, on her doping control form when she had given samples in the past.

      The nature of Sharapova’s long-term usage should be critical to her case. If she can prove it was for legitimate medical purposes, the case for leniency is stronger. There is also the fact that she has plenty of company in 2016, with athletes across a range of sports — from figure skating and speed skating to track and weight lifting — testing positive this year for meldonium, whose use was reportedly widespread before the ban, particularly in Russia."

      Analysis from the NYT...... https://t.co/KS3svkprR5

      Delete
  31. Dick Pound also said that the drug was flagged because "lots" of tennis players were taking it. Although Sharapova is a big fish, the "lots" of players seems to me to be a much bigger story (especially if you believe that it was always a form of cheating), but something the tennis media won't touch with a 10 foot pole.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Nikola Pilic, a famous Croatian coach who used to coach Novak Djokovic as a teenager, in his academy, spoke to Alo and admitted his non-understanding about Meldonium's sudden prohibition.

      'It's a medicine for diabetes, they say, (Alexander) Zverev uses it with doctor's permission..... "

      Source: http://www.tennisworldusa.org/Nikola-Pilic-Djokovic-He-is-too-smart-to-unintentionally-consume-a-controlled-substance-articolo30878.html

      Hence, if a rising star ( very young ) like Alexander Zverev was using Meldonium, imagine how much Meldonium a falling star was using..!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      Delete
    2. I made a comment about Pound's "lots of" allegation on the Sports Illustrated story. My comment has been flagged and pending for almost a full day now. I guess that's not news.

      Delete
  32. Rafael Nadal: Spaniard says he is a 'completely clean guy'

    Rafael Nadal has denied he has ever used a banned substance to get an edge or to speed up recovery from injury.

    Asked for his reaction to Maria Sharapova's failed drug test, the 14-time Grand Slam champion took the opportunity to address speculation he has used performance-enhancing drugs.

    The Spaniard, 29, said he was "a little bit tired" of the rumours, adding: "I am a completely clean guy.

    "I have never had the temptation of doing something wrong."

    Nadal added: "I believe in the sport and the values of the sport.

    "It is an example for the kids and if I am doing something that goes against that, I will be lying to myself, not lying to my opponents."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/tennis/35770949

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wonder if he rehearses that line in the mirror.

      Delete
    2. I wonder if he believes himself. That would make at least one person gullible enough to believe Nadal is and was clean. Ivan Drago in Rocky IV was cleaner.

      Delete
    3. "Ivan Drago in Rocky IV was cleaner"

      instead you think that Rocky Balboa in Rocky IV was clean??

      I don't at all!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      Delete
    4. I think Nadal feels relatively safe saying this because he has stopped (or dramatically decreased) his usage. It's obvious in his performance over the past year or so. The fact that he got away with it for so long is cringe-worthy. Maybe he had a health scare or wants to start a family or maybe he got one too many silent bans and the powers that be told him enough already. I don't know the reason but it's clear he's cut back. So, saying he is clean is probably safe enough now that he won't be caught in a lie,

      Delete
    5. The tennis equivalent of Rocky Balboa would be Novak, who came to destroy Ivan Drago, ehm, Rafael Nadal. Do I think Novak is clean? Absolutely, gluten-clean :-) Nadal may be clean today, seeing him lose first-round matches without injury excuse make that story credible. What a mess, only Serena left to look up to for integrity and fairplay

      Delete
    6. Nadal trained at the Lance Armstrong School of Media Relations and Denial.

      Delete
  33. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  34. I see there is the usual pattern of player reactions. On the one hand --

    Williams: "She showed a lot of courage"

    Djokovic: “I obviously wish her all the best. I’ve known her for a long time. I feel for her with all that’s happening and I just hope she gets out of this stronger.”

    Nadal: "I am a completely clean guy. I have never had the temptation of doing something wrong."

    Whereas...

    Murray: "Clearly if you are taking performance-enhancing drugs and you fail a drugs test, you have to get suspended"

    Murray then keenly observes: "I find it strange that there's a prescription drug used for heart conditions and so many athletes competing at the top level of their sport would have that condition. That sounds a bit off to me."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/tennis/35778931

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Murray stating the obvious - why would need a heart medication for to manage signs of diabetes?

      Delete
  35. Well he's right of course... shame the others can't say that but they have their own agenda

    ReplyDelete
  36. Andy Murray: Maria Sharapova 'must take responsibility'

    Maria Sharapova "must accept responsibility" for failing a drugs test and serve her ban, according to Andy Murray.

    The five-time Grand Slam winner, 28, revealed on Monday that she tested positive for meldonium in January.

    "Clearly if you are taking performance-enhancing drugs and you fail a drugs test, you have to get suspended," said Briton Murray, the world number two.

    Russian Sharapova will be provisionally suspended from 12 March.

    The former world number one says she has been taking the drug, which was added the World Anti-Doping Agency's banned list on 1 January, for health reasons for the past 10 years.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/tennis/35778931

    ReplyDelete
  37. Why doesn't everyone dope and level the playing field? So tired of watching sports and to be kept guessing whether an athlete is performing without "help". WADA should come up with a list of drugs everyone is allowed to enhance performance and then we won't need WADA.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are wrong because:

      1) you ignore the basic principles of human physiology: the same amount of PED ( Performance-enhancing drug ) provided ( obviously at the same times ) for example to 10 athletes will give 10 different biochimical responses!!

      The same principle is even true for common substances: alcohol , tobacco, coffee and so on!!

      2)As far as:

      "So tired of watching sports"

      For example, do you like watching tennis?

      Playing tennis would be much more useful for your body and your mind!!

      And you can even meet some sexy women to play...!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      Delete
    2. Doping has serious health implications, so presumably you would still need rules and sanctions if only to save athletes from talking/or being forced to take the most hardcore stuff. The problem is, as soon as you introduce rules, we will find ourselves in the same situation, where a bunch of athletes seek to gain an advantage through cheating. Straight away the level playing field scenario is out the window.

      And what would we do with athletes who simply want to compete without dope? Tell them if they can't stand the heat, get out the kitchen?

      Effort should be spent trying to protect the integrity of sport by throwing the cheats out, rather than introducing some sadistic, gladiator style event for the entertainment weirdos.

      Delete
  38. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Just a meaningful update!!

    "The drug taken by Maria Sharapova was used by the Soviet Union to help soldiers combat stress"

    Meldonium, also known as mildronate, "was invented in the Soviet era, when Ivars Kalviņš was studying mechanisms of stress on the body," according to a 2009 article in the weekend supplement of Latvia's Diena newspaper.

    "His research results coincided with the authorities' demand to create a medicine that enhances endurance and performance. So the medicine, first produced in small quantities in laboratories, became a part of a nearly everyday diet for [Soviet] soldiers – it was used by pilots and those who served on submarines, as well by those who took part in the [Soviet] war in Afghanistan," Diena wrote.

    “High altitude. Oxygen deprivation. If you have to run 20 kilometers with your full kit, you wind up with ischemia," Kalviņš told Diena in 2009, referring to a shortage of oxygen in the heart muscles. "All of them were given mildronate. They themselves didn’t know what they were using. There no one asked any questions."......

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/03/08/the-drug-linked-to-tennis-great-sharapova-has-roots-in-soviet-military/

    Best regards.

    Fabrice

    ReplyDelete
  40. The whole thing makes me angry. Now Maria's racket company are coming out and questioning why WADA have banned this drug!

    I bet Maria will get out of this with a slap on the wrist and end up playing the Olympics too.

    Nadal and Djokovic's comments were a bit weird to say the least. Murray seems to have the right attitude......... I can't help but wonder if Murray has been cheated out of a few GS titles over the last few years.

    ReplyDelete
  41. I don't know what to make of the now 100 positive tests since Jan for this drug. Does add weight to the comments that it's an over the counter drug that has been used in Eastern Europe as a vitamin. If athletes have thought of it in those terms, they may not have even considered it a PED added to the list, hence so many failed tests.

    On the other hand, it could have been used for years in Russian sports as a PED which they thought they thought couldn't be detected.

    Has there ever been so many positives for one drug as soon as its banned? Surely if people were aware it had performance enhancing qualities, they would have been extra vigilant. The whole thing is bizarre.

    Sharapova might have been better saying it was one of a few vitamins she takes and she had no idea it was anything other than that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I find all of the postive tests very bizarre as well. It seems like people at the top of various sports would have people on staff who would be very cognizant of these things. It's hard to believe that Maria Sharapova deals personally with professional emails, which I presume is where a communication from the ITF falls.

      Delete
  42. Roselyne Bachelote, ex sport minister of France, is openly attacking Nadal, saying that his seven month absence was evidently a silent ban and everybody knows. Nadal and his uncle insulting her and threatening with lawyers. Is the big show of unmaking the Spaniard to start, finally? I lay back and observe with intense expectation and amusement

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They won't go to court, these are just threats from the Nadal camp. IIRC, over the years, they never sued anyone for libel; they would never risk Nadal have to take an oath (can you imagine the nervous tics he would have in court, haha!).

      Delete
    2. the only sad thing, just now, parallel to Sharapova, happens this strange "off court knee injury" to Federer which takes him out for several months. Until 2-3 years ago, I firmly believed he was clean..., those days are gone.

      Delete
    3. I agree, the Federer injury leaves a bad taste in my mouth too. I'm a huge Roger fan, but this is kind of an eye opener (is it common that players play tennis the day after being eliminated, in the semis no less - plus we all know they test the losers of matches).

      Delete
    4. Still, I hope they catch Nadal and SWilliams the most though: these two are the biggest freaks I have seen wielding a racquet, the physical changes, the long absences, the various (convenient) "ailments" and "injuries", etc. But yeah, hate this point I would like the whole sport to blow open.

      Delete
    5. He's unlikely to fake a knee surgery.. Even with laproscopic approaches, there are scars.

      Delete
    6. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    7. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    8. *Got some of the dates wrong*

      Federer revealed he had knee surgery 5 days after his loss to Djokovic where he would have gotten tested after the match. Is 5 days enough time for the ITF to test his A and B samples and ban him? I don't think so.

      In comparison Sharapova received the ITF's verdict on March 2nd (5 weeks after she was tested) and was provisionally banned from March 12th. She did not even ask for her B sample to be tested which would have prolonged the process even further.

      The only way I see Federer's absence on tour being due to a silent ban is if he tested positive at the WTF (presuming he was tested there) and he had just received the results or he was doped during the Australian Open and he already knew that he would test positive, so he decided to get ahead and pull himself out of tournaments.

      The only problem with that last scenario is if an athlete definitely knows they would test positive, I would think that the athlete would try his/her out-most best to evade the test (just look at Armstrong and Hamilton).

      Delete
  43. Just two other meaningful upedates!!


    1) "Maria Sharapova's Failed Doping Test: What Is Meldonium?"
    By Taylor Kubota, Live Science Contributor - March 11, 2016

    A review of studies focusing on the effects of Mildronate, published in a booklet from the 5th Baltic Sport Science Conference in 2012, said otherwise. The authors of the review agreed that Mildronate optimizes oxygen consumption for protection against certain heart problems. They added, however, that Mildronate could have many advantageous effects for athletes, such as increased endurance, improved aerobic capabilities and reduced recovery times after physical exertion.......

    http://www.livescience.com/54024-what-is-meldonium.html

    2)Sharapova’s claim that she has been taking it for years for “medical reasons” doesn’t sound very plausible, at least at first, considering what the approved patient population looks like – they tend not to have very effective backhand strokes......

    http://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2016/03/08/up-to-speed-on-meldonium

    Best regards.

    Fabrice

    ReplyDelete
  44. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  45. Has anyone considered that the amount of publicity given to meldonium would have cost millions if purchased through usual channels. There is a report that the reason this drug is virtually unknown in the west is due to the fact that the rights for those regions were sold to a company whose sole objective was to prevent the drug coming to market outside of eastern Europe - so the makers hands have been tied other than internet sales by word of mouth. With the drug not having approval for use in bonafide medical practice there remains a huge sports/fitness/gym marketplace made up of amateurs who will never undergo a test for PEDs.

    Internet sales are reported to have rocketed since Maria's press conference and I certainly read many reactions/posts along the lines of 'this drug sounds great, where can I get it'?.

    The global pharmaceutical industry is worth far more than sports goods, sports cars or expensive watches and for the moment this drug appears to have only one 'ambassador'.

    ReplyDelete
  46. The International Tennis Federation has rejected claims by a former French politician that Rafael Nadal failed a doping test. Accusations of (former sports minister) Roselyne Bachelot against Rafael Nadal are not only surprising, but also incorrect," an ITF spokesman in London told German news agency DPA.

    The names of all players penalized for violating the tennis anti-doping program are announced publicly as required by the rules of the program and the world anti-doping code, the spokesman added.



    In addition, WADA (the World Anti-Doping Agency) maintains its own independent monitoring of the results of the samples collected players, so that would not only be aware of any attempt to camouflage ( 'cover up') or failed deliberate in acting on any positive control, but would also have the right to appeal against any decision, so as to pursue any apparent breach that had occurred in the program ".


    ANy thoughts about this? kinda confident statement from the ITF that Rafa has never tested positive for anything. What get's me though is that they say all findings are anounced publicly, and yet we have the Agassi case where nothing was known, and the Cilic case were a local Croatian newspaper were the ones who announced it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Public and private information are two different things. I have spoken with a senior WADA official who confided in me that "Nadal has been on EPO's for years - the Spaniards have become really good at it". Also, he said Nadal's resurgence of form indoors late last year on his worst surface coming off an otherwise terrible year was "impossible". I cannot disclose the official's name because the information was given to me privately. I am inclined to go with the French Sports Minister.

      Delete
    2. i would like to say it's great information but without sources, i have nothing to go by. why wouldn't your contact share this information publicly? is he legally or professionally bound even with proof? or is this a general speculation by WADA, but without incriminating evidence?

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    4. I guess the problem is that the most advanced dopers are not doing anything illegal, because it is not illegal yet. Sharapova took that stuff for ten years, but it's only considered doping since 2016, before it was, well, the poor girl had a critical heart condition before 2016 that needed treatment. I guess what Nadal and Djokovic are taking (have been taking) is (was) not illegal. Integrity is to take things that doping agencies have not yet discovered.

      Delete
    5. @Jericho

      The opinion given me was a personal view, and not on behalf of WADA. It would therefore be unfair of me to disclose the source. The view offered me was the estimation of an anti-doping official, based on his considerable professional experience. Make of that what you will. If it was based on positive test results confirmed by WADA then it would undoubtedly be public information, and the speculation would be over.

      Delete
  47. So Sharapova has posted a message on her facebook page to clarify information in the media....ending with "I’m proud of how I have played the game. I have been honest and upfront. I won’t pretend to be injured so I can hide the truth about my testing" is she referring to the ATP, the WTA (in which she has close dealings with) or both?

    then:

    "I hope I will be allowed to play again. But no matter what, I want you, my fans, to know the truth and have the facts."

    She couldn't be any more subtle in stating she will start naming names if things don't go her way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love her. She is one of many, she knows it, and she is a) not ready to play the farce of sudden injury, and b) not going down alone. Is she going to talk? I hope she has some extra Russian bodyguards at her side these days, there is a lot at stake here.

      Delete
    2. "I won't pretend to be injured so I can hide the truth about my testing".

      Who on earth can she be referring to?

      Delete
    3. @GMurph

      There is a big contradiction in what she has jus said because any really honest person who says he/she is completely honest is sure of his/her honesty 100% and in doing so, he/she only minds his/her business!!

      As a logical consequence, he/she wouldn't launch any mob style message to other colleagues!!

      Apart from that, have you noticed that no one in mass media has reported what Sharapova said about doping in the past years?

      What a strange reaction..!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      Delete
    4. @fab farn, no theres been no reaction from any media source.
      On Sharapovas statement, maybe this a warning shot to the ITF because she was advised to go out on injury (considering initially she had an arm injury and withdrew from IW). Perhaps she is aware this is common practice. She wouldn't be privy to any other players tests results only rumors if particular players are suddenly injured.
      Honesty is lacking all round anyway if this is the case and if it takes one peeved diva to bring down the house of cards, i'm not going to loose any sleep over her tactics doing so.

      Delete
    5. Thank you for your prompt response!!

      Anyway, as far as "if it takes one peeved diva to bring down the house of cards, i'm not going to loose any sleep over her tactics doing so."

      Me too!!

      But she has been only in the middle of the "Perfect Storm" and so she can scream as much as she wants but she won't be saved from Americans or Russians because she isn't American 100% ( paid only taxes in USA ) and she isn't Russian 100% ( played only very few matches of Fed Cup during her career ) nor from her main American sponsor, Nike, that was very upset for her intentions of playing few tournaments in 2016 and 2017 ( a business insider within sport sponsorship told me this fact!! ), in other words, political power games among USA and Russia + an upset main sponsor, determined the "Perfect Storm"!!

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

      Delete
    6. People are suggesting she was referring to Nadal (because of his recent comments), but I think she was probably referring to Cilic, and his pulling out of tournaments 'injured' while contesting his AAF.

      Delete
    7. Nadal and the subject of "Silent Bans" has been in the press this week thanks to Bachelot. Also Nadal somewhat criticized her saying she should pay. Perhaps she thought that he was been hypocritical.

      Delete
  48. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  49. Google "Roselyne Bachelot Nadal". A French ex-minister of sports has accused Nadal of doping publicly, and she is being threatened with a law suit (something Nadal never did with previous accusations, funnily enough). Maybe someone here could write something to help her with her defense!

    ReplyDelete
  50. This Bachelot thing is tactic to mixed up the things,to take the eyes of Federer. Federer is tested positive guys and he is going to be forced to retire pretty soon.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Football clubs in Russia took any players using this drug and other drugs like it off them at start of October. Other "measures" are now in place. It was a PED, known as such, and one of many, many drugs taken in sports to give an edge. However apart from this and match-fixing, there are far greater crimes to deal with in tennis that will never, ever be dealt with so long as we have so much noise about the top dopers/fixers. The ITF will continue to avoid their responsibility with the non-stop media generated nonsense.

    ReplyDelete
  52. Tennis Live Stream

    Live Tennis

    streaming Tennis Online

    Tennis Live Coverage

    Live Tennis stream

    Over 2700 Live ATP & WTA Matches A Year, Now In HD Get Full Access On Your Computer, Mobile Devices Laptop Mac Ios Linux Or More Digital Devices

    ReplyDelete