Thursday, April 7, 2016

How many TUE applications are they getting?

Interesting news from the ITF:

07 Apr 2016

Enhanced Therapeutic Use Exemption (“TUE”) Service

NEWS ARTICLE
In recognition of the year-round professional tennis competition schedule, the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (“TADP”) is constantly reviewed in order to improve its efficiency, while maintaining a quality programme. These reviews include the TUE service provided to players. In recent years, the time taken by the independent TUE Committee to issue a decision on a fully-completed application has been under three working days.

While this is significantly in excess of the 28-day benchmark time required by WADA, there has been a delay in the processing of TUEs, in that there has been no administrative service at weekends. This gave rise to an opportunity to enhance the TUE service.

Since 1 January, the TUE service under the TADP has been extended to 7 days per week (during normal working hours). This change means that any delays in the processing of TUEs due to office closure at weekends have been eliminated. All TUE applications that require processing on Saturday or Sunday are now being administered in accordance with the standard process.

This change should reduce the time taken from receipt by IDTM of a fully-completed application to the notification to the player of a decision on that application, where that time involves weekend days. (There should be no change to TUEs that do not require any processing at weekends).

A common reason for the delay in processing a TUE application is a failure to provide all of the supporting medical information. In this regard, players and their doctors are directed to the document ‘TUE supporting medical information and validities’, which is available on the TUE page of the ITF Anti-Doping website (use the QR code at the bottom of this page).

45 comments:

  1. When players over 34 with debilitating illnesses like fatigue related conditions or damaged lungs out preform or at least convincingly compete in 3hr matches with their younger counterparts you have to ask the question - Even though the USAD test quarterly with no positive result - is there a TUE (or a few of them) involved?

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  3. 5 (grandiose) paragraphs for an announcement that only needed one sentence..

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  4. Interesting read......

    http://www.scotsman.com/sport/tennis/richard-moore-still-losing-fight-against-doping-in-sport-1-4095467

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  5. Former WADA president Dick Pound believes sport is digging own grave with doping and internal politics

    http://www.heraldscotland.com/sport/14416184.Former_WADA_president_Dick_Pound_believes_sport_is_digging_own_grave_with_doping_and_internal_politics/

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  6. If anything has become more and more apparent with the information now available about doping in sport (and other practices like match-fixing) it is that it is largely irrelevant to debate whether this or that individual sportsman (or tennis player) may or may not be doping. The problem has clearly become systemic: professional sport has a culture of doping. The clean athlete and the doping offender can no longer be confidently or clearly differentiated. Experts like Dick Pound warn of the seriousness and scale of the problem; it is only a matter of time before the public arrives at that similar awareness - and loses interest in the farce that professional sport has become.

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    1. +1. The problem seems systemic. It is high time the authorities put a full stop to this charade.

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  7. http://en.yibada.com/articles/115326/20160410/david-ferrer-believes-novak-djokovic-at-his-golden-era-rafael-nadal-taking-ped-is-impossible-atp-update.htm

    How surprising that one Spaniard (himself a prime doping suspect) should defend another - the biggest suspect of all - from an accusation of doping. Of course it is interesting that for all his talk Nadal has yet to follow through with his threatened legal action against the former French Sports Minister, who accused him of doping.

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    1. It is noteworthy that the extent of Ferrer's so-called defence of Nadal is simply to assert that it is "impossible" for Nadal to cheat at a sport he loves so much. How about the time-code violations, the on-court coaching violations and dubious MTO's at critical times in important matches, not to mention the convenient "injuries" when Nadal is threatened with an embarrassing loss? Of course he couldn't cheat, David - even though he seems to love winning even more than the game itself. We also know that if Nadal had a mind to dope he could easily get away with it. Indeed, his doping (or any other player's doping) is far from "impossible", David.

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  8. Let's make TUEs public, if not by athlete name, then by drug and sport.

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  9. The more I read about this meldonium issue - the more I see it as a red herring. Sure they caught a bunch of athletes, sure they caught Sharapova and funny enough they're all Eastern Europeans. Cold War 2.0 - the doping version has begun.

    Here's an interesting quote from a recent Toronto Star article:
    http://www.thestar.com/sports/tennis/2016/04/08/only-the-truth-can-save-maria-sharapova-now-cox.html

    Mutko says the problem is Russia needs to develop its own drugs for athletes.

    “When we aren’t creating our own, we get caught using Latvian or Chinese substances,” he said. “We should have our own scientific research activity in high-level sport.”

    There is some truth in what he said.
    Incidentally, I'm not a big fan of the journo - he's written a few pro-Nadal articles in the past.

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  10. Well Federer returned and went through his opponent like a dose of salts. You wouldn't have thought he had ever had surgery............

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    1. Were you expecting a limp?

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    2. I was expecting a degree of rustiness. There were no signs at all. What is sauce for Nadal should also be sauce for Federer. Federer apparently had knee surgery. The man is after all almost 35. One would expect it to be harder to regain full fitness,

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    3. And what do you know about the effects and recovery rate of arthroscopic surgery on a torn miniscus? Or are all injuries and their treatment the same to you? I also speak as someone who has experienced knee surgery with a full recovery.

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    4. I think that there is a radical difference between the full recovery of a "normal" person and the recovery needed to play tennis at the level Federer does.

      Federer's "eternal youth" has been ringing alarm bells in my mind for a while. If we discount Federer from suspicion just because he is Federer then those people who dismiss this site as one inhabited by disgruntled Federer fans have a point. Whilst I have not had knee surgery, I have had other joint surgery and full recovery within a matter of weeks stinks to me. Perhaps I am just a Cynic?

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    5. There’s nothing wrong with been a cynic. I think we are all cynics here, so you're not alone.

      As for Federer recovering quickly, it will differ from person to person. It also depends on the grade/severity of tear he had. Meniscus tears are pretty common for athletes.

      Looking at examples from other sports it’s not unusual for “world-class athletes” who have access to top doctors and recovery methods to bounce back:

      1.)
      http://edition.cnn.com/2016/02/03/tennis/federer-knee-injury-tennis-surgery/

      In 2014, striker Luis Suarez bounced back from a meniscal surgery within four weeks to score for Uruguay against England at the World Cup in Brazil.
      […]
      Sean Curry, a specialist knee surgeon at London Orthopedic Clinic said recovery times can vary significantly.

      "There's a big difference between a small meniscal tear and a large one. It also depends on how the patient applies themselves to their recovery," he said.

      "For someone like Federer, who will have one-on-one physio and plenty of time to work hard, a return within a month is reasonable."

      Once the swelling has subsided and the muscles are back to full strength, Curry said the patient is "good to go."

      2.)
      “Elite athletes return to practice within one to two weeks after surgery, but they are a motivated group of people who spend hours each day in rehabilitation. For most other patients, return to mild routine activity occurs in less than six weeks.”

      http://www.medicinenet.com/torn_meniscus/page9.htm

      3.)
      Michael Bennett of the Georgis Bulltions tore his Meniscus, underwent arthroscopic surgery and was back on the field within a month. He even matched his season high on his first game back

      http://chronicle.augusta.com/sports/college/2013-11-04/michael-bennetts-return-boost-georgias-offense#gsc.tab=0

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    6. Your assertion that Federer doesn’t look like someone who didn't surgery comes from you suspecting that he never had surgery in the first place, and that his absence was due to a failed test. I replied then why the argument of him failing a test during that time period was weak (especially when one takes into account the gap in days from when he would have had his loser targeted test to when he revealed he had surgery)

      Also using Nadal as a comparison is misleading. I don’t know how long you’ve followed Nadal and his various illnesses, but as far as I know for all for his various knee problems, Nadal has NEVER had any surgery on his knees. He’s had various dubious “treatments” (PRP and Stem Cell treatments) but never surgery, so their situations cannot be compared.

      Honestly, I much prefer the idea that after Federer underwent surgery he used something illegal to recover…Peyton Manning style. That would make more sense, and I can see that happening.

      Anyway I believe we have a resident Doctor on here, Arcus, perhaps you can chime in?

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    7. What hardly ever seems to come up in this talk about substances and Federer is that he is a classic all court player. His style of play including footwork which includes open stance on both sides most of the time and the effortless tug-of-war style release on a traditional back makes his whole game at least five times more effortless than someone like Nadal. Nadal on the other hand is Spanish and the whole Spanish elite sports spectrum is suspect, if you know anything about the cycling scandal that occurred several years ago. It's in the archives here, but the same doctor who takes care of those cyclists takes care of all of Spain's elite athletes and the government of Spain didn't even sanction for steroids up until recently. I believe it was Federer who said that more testing needs to be done, that he's routinely tested at home in Switzerland but nowhere else is he tested so much. He is for more testing period!

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    8. I meant to say 'traditional backhand', of course.

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    9. "I was expecting a degree of rustiness. There were no signs at all."

      Not sure if you watched his match against Tsonga, but by the 3rd set one could see that Federer was a bit weathered and late on most of his shots. It might also have something to do with him mentioning after his last match, that his muscles felt stiff/tired. Of course Tsonga is a tougher opponent than Garcia-Lopez and Bautista Agut.

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  11. Doping - WADA announces meldonium amnesty

    The presence of less than one microgram of meldonium in doping samples in tests conducted on athletes before March 1 this year is acceptable, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) said on Wednesday.

    Meldonium was added to WADA's list of banned substances on Jan. 1, 2016, with athletes around the world being informed of the decision in the autumn of 2015.

    Russian Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko, who had recently said 40 Russian sportsmen and women failed dope tests for meldonium, including tennis player Maria Sharapova and swimmer Yulia Efimova, welcomed the decision by the world body.

    "The Russian Sports Ministry supports and welcomes the decision made by WADA because it has showed a willingness to understand the situation, rather than stick to the rulebook," Mutko said in a statement on Wednesday.

    "They were ready to study how long it would take for meldonium to be eliminated from the body of an athlete.

    "... WADA has demonstrated impartiality and being objective in the fight against doping."

    Alexei Kravtsov, the president of the Russian Skaing Union (RSU), said that five-time World Champion Pavel Kulizhnikov and 2014 Olympic short track gold medalist Semen Elistratov -- both found to have taken meldonium -- should be allowed to compete again after the WADA decision.

    "These sportsmen should be allowed to fall under the amnesty due to the amount found in their doping tests," Kravtsov was quoted as saying by the R-Sport news agency.

    "They were not guilty, as we had been saying earlier. This is of course good news, but there is still a bit of a cloud hanging over all of this."

    http://uk.reuters.com/article/doping-wada-meldonium-idUKL3N17G2SK
    --

    So it looks like Sharapova might be back earlier than expected.

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    1. https://wada-mailing-list.s3.amazonaws.com/2016-04-12-Meldonium_Notice_Final.pdf

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  12. @UntitledK9

    Shameful!!
    Evidently, there was an exchange of favors:
    I WADA put it in a way to put a lid on the matter Meldonium Russian athletes, and you Russians don't blow the whistle about the skeletons in the closets of American and British athletes that you already know!!
    You cannot explain a march back so sensational by WADA in another way!!
    Best regards.
    Fabrice

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    1. If the biggest and most famous of all Russian athletes, Maria Sharapova, had never tested positive, would WADA have made this decision?

      Regards to you too.

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    2. There also might be something far bigger than Sharapova!!

      For example, corruption of WADA big managers through hidden payments in tax havens!!

      Here is an interesting article!!

      "Dirty Money Makes the World Go Round"

      The real players -- accounting for nearly $6 trillion -- are crime syndicates, cartels and organized tax dodging in developing countries, led by China and, increasingly, Russia....

      http://europe.newsweek.com/dirty-money-makes-world-go-round-224344?rm=eu

      Best regards.

      Fabrice

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  13. Nadal at Monte Carlo: balder than ever but playing the same ridiculous tennis he always has on clay. Forget Sharapova - the biggest cheat of them all is alive and well on his favorite surface.

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    1. The match was more about Thiem's lost chances. He faltered on the majority of big points. But yes, balder than ever (must be a side effect, no?)

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    2. Wawrinka is battling out there but the old clay-court Nadal is back. Amazing how he does it every year, no? despite abysmal results now in every other part of the tennis year off-clay.

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    3. Sorry, I spoke too soon. Wawrinka just match-fixed in the eighth game of the second set. Collapse.

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    4. BTW, have you noticed that Nadal has yet to sue the former French Sports Minister for calling him out as a doper? He is more likely to switch to a one-handed backhand.

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    5. Nadal still hasn't sued Journal Du Dimanche after they explicitly said that he was a client of Fuentes. That was 10 years ago. These cases take time I guess...

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    6. As far as I know, Nadal still hasn’t sued the producers of a very popular French comic show, the Guignols, for this joke, over 4 years after the facts.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pce5q6-JyMU

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    7. Murray looks done early in the 3rd set, but, as the commentators say, Nadal is fresher than when he began. Where are Guignols, Du Dimanche and Minister Bachelot? The king of dopers reigns once again. I am picking only a gluten-free player can stop him winning a ridiculous 10th FO title, while still losing everywhere else off-clay.

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    8. I have the feeling that Djoker will not be in Nadal's half of the French open this year.

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  14. Head CEO calls for amnesty for Maria Sharapova and other meldonium athletes

    http://sport.bt.com/more-sport-hub/more-sport/head-ceo-calls-for-amnesty-for-maria-sharapova-and-other-meldonium-athletes-S11364051992821

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  15. Well worth a read. Who on earth could Andy Murray be talking about? Given that yesterday he lost to a player who:-

    A) Was receiving on court coaching
    B) Was trampling all over the rule above time between serves
    C) Was calling for the trainer as a means of disrupting his rhythm.
    D) Seemed to be playing a match under the control of an umpire who had been told to ensure Nadal won.

    Perhaps Murray is finally losing patience with being deprived of victories by players who are cheating.

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    1. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/tennis/article-3543766/Maria-Sharapova-s-drugs-ban-progress-tennis-according-Andy-Murray.html

      Sorry the link.

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    2. Murray is one of the strongest and fittest players on tour. Despite comprehensively outplaying his opponent in the first set he had no chance thereafter as his opponent increased the average speed of his groundstrokes by 10kph as the match wore on and absolutely ground a clearly fatigued Murray into the clay in the final set. And who was this strangely tireless opponent? Oh, yeah ...

      Must have given Murray further food for thought, you would think?

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    3. Watching Nadal play Monfils makes me wanna puke. From a player who has been able to do nothing for almost year his defense, court coverage and power is now obscene. No one can watch this spectacle without observing the consequences of a maxed-out doping regime in action by this repulsive cheat.

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    4. It should also be noted that the player that his compatriot Ferrer says is incapable of cheating is currently averaging 32 secs between points (as against Monfils av of 21secs), which is of course 7secs over the limit.

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    5. Well, Gael! Making a fight of it! I suppose Nadal is so used to losing now there's a chance he will choke. Sadly, I suspect you have to be a doper to beat one now.

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    6. Well, if you blinked you missed the third set. Monfils was done and Nadal was fresh as a daisy. As you would expect.

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    7. The french commentators said that Monfils was tired in the third set not mentioning the "curious" fact that Nadal had a much tougher and longer match yesterday.

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