Monday, May 23, 2016

USADA Tennis Testing: As of May 19, 2016

From USADA:
 
13 Athletes Selected
26 Total Tests

Athlete Name
Test Count

Robert C Bryan
5

Jamie Hampton
2

John Isner
1

Steve Johnson
2

Varvara Lepchenko
1

Bethanie Mattek-Sands
1

Christina M McHale
1

Sam Querrey
1

Sloane Stephens
2

CoCo Vandeweghe
2

Serena J Williams
3

Venus E Williams
3

Donald Young
2

66 comments:

  1. Rob Bryan has always been tested a lot, but like most people I don't watch doubles so I wouldn't know if he is suspicious or not. Isner is another one who gets tested a lot, but only 1 this time, less than he usually gets. The Williamses on the other hand, always tested a lot including this time.

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  2. Wow.. if Djokovic can go toe-to-toe with the best over 5 sets at 37, he'll win 20 slams.

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    1. Yeah man, what r these guys on that's allowing so much longevity in their careers! Stepanek almost took Murray out, but Murray usually gets better as the match progresses except against Djoker. Although, lately he might be able to match him if it rains. Djoker doesn't play well in rainy conditions.

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    2. Of course. Stepanek plays one close match versus Andy Murray and he immediately falls under suspicion of doping. Nevermind that Stepanek's ranking has dropped outside the top 100, the match was suspended due to darkness - which allowed him to recover for the final set - and he still came out the loser in the end.

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    3. He certainly kept it competitive until the very end. Impressive for a 37 year-old who was out for 8 months last year with an injury.

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    4. Stepanek's playing style is from a different era, he was always going to pose problems for Murray, he had in the past. Radek played some great droppers and kept Murray of balance for most of the match, it wasn't as though he was out-grinding Murray or serving him of the court.

      Also, both players did get somewhat of a rest after the match was suspended.

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  3. I can't wait till the SF of Roland Garros between Nadal and Djokovic. Bring out the popcorn and settle down for a five hour slug-fest on clay. Yay.

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    1. Barf me! Won't watch a second of it.

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    2. Nadal has clearly found a way to beat the bio passport.

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    3. He among many others (how many?) has probably got a TUE! If I were a betting person I'd put money on that. The Spanish government's in- different attitude towards steroid use, the single doctor who assisted all Spain's elite athletes including Nadal and supplied all members of their cycling team with steroids, his overnight buffing up, which he attributed to 'just tennis' when asked many years ago, his chronic injuries and all or nothing style, all together are cause for suspicion. Three sets giving up only three games inside of 80 minutes is absurd.

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    4. @richard

      Federer found it 2 years ago. As soon as they started collecting samples in 2013, his level plummeted but found a way to bounce back within a year. Nadal is 2 years late.

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    5. @Anonymous009

      Which doctor? How do you know that he supplied steroid to Nadal?

      Also you must not have watched numerous Federer early round beat downs at slams. Actually Nadal has always struggled in early rounds in comparison. It might have something to do with the fact that Sam Groth has nothing other than a first serve. That may keep him close on grass but on clay he is completely useless. Besides, many consider Nadal to be the best clay court player ever, that may also play a small part in his wins.

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    6. And look how Federer is currently taking the tennis world apart. I guess he stopped doping just when he found out how well it was working for him.

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    7. Isn't he out injured since the AO where he probably would have won at 34 if not for the best player at the moment? or 3 other slams in the last 2 years making him the first player in the open era to have such dominance at 33-34? Not suspicious at all. In any case, I will have to wait and see what Federer does on grass to comment on the extent of his injury. Could very well be laying the ground for a spectacular grass season. He was not scheduled to play much on clay anyway.

      On the other hand when it comes to Nadal, by your logic, when Nadal(at 29) is not playing well, the bio passport is working and when he is playing slightly better he found a way to beat it. How convenient! He is just an average player on clay otherwise.

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    8. So you are just a piqued Nadal fan after all. You crack me up if you think Federer is a better poster boy for doping than the Spaniard. But that's what comes through loud and clear.

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    9. That's your Federer bias saying. That is the best you could do after I exposed your hypocrisy!

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    10. You expose only your limited intellectual capacity. That and a pro-Nadal bias desperate to argue that because Nadal is easily identifiable as a drug cheat Federer must be an even bigger one. You are very obvious. And about as convincing as a guy in a tin-foil hat who argues the moon-landings were faked. I'm sure you believe that, too.

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    11. Yeah great intellectuals like you are identified by their incredible ability to keep changing the goalpost. Only a grade A idiot would suddenly claim that Nadal has found a way to beat the bio passport system without any basis. People who read this space and have an IQ over 50 would quickly recognize your inherent bias. But that seems to be the whole purpose of your life. I don't envy you! This is my last post to you.

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    12. Is Boreman in the house?

      BTW for all intents and purposes Nadal is 30 (his birthday is in a week) and he is having a resurgence at 30, when many pundits predicted a shortened career due to his playing style. Nadal's career has been one of mysterious absences from the tour followed by stellar years. And a chronic knee problem that miraculously went away, seemingly over night. Federer has never had such absences until now, at almost 35 years old. He played 65 straight grand slams. How many straight grand slams did Nadal play?

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    14. are you sure about that?

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    15. Who the hell is Boreman?

      So is that a new test? That you have to play consecutive slams? FYI Djokovic has played 45 consecutive slams and may as well get to 65 if he doesn't get injured, yet he has been a constant target in the last couple of years, especially after he started beating Saint Federer at majors.

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    16. @ John Clarke

      I see what you're trying to do, but it's futile. There's no point discussing Federer on this blog. I used to post a lot more here, but over time, it became clear that this place is more or less a gathering ground for bitter Federer fanboys and fangirls. Anyone who quetions Federer is made out to be Djoko or Nadal tard or a sockpuppet account. It's a real shame because all the big tennis forums have a strict 'no doping' policy where just the mere mention of that word can get one's posting rights revoked. No one's saying that Federer is a surefire doper, but posters should at least be able to voice their suspicions without his fans shouting them down all the time.

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    17. http://tennishasasteroidproblem.blogspot.co.uk/2016/03/fast-furious.html?showComment=1458995946233#c8482664994061364155

      Every fan base has their reasoning. I maybe generalising but roughly:

      Djokovic’s fans: “Federer must be doping. There’s no way a 33/34 year old can beat my favorite player who is playing at the highest level Tennis has ever seen without the use of PEDs. Also Federer is playing the best tennis of his career at 34, who does that?”

      Federer’s fans: “Nadal and Djokovic must be doping, look at their sudden improvements in stamina and all the times they beat my favorite in slam finals”

      Murray’s fans: “Djokovic and Federer must be doping. Look at the times when they have continually beaten my favourite player in grand slams. Also, shouldn’t that arrogant and smug 34 year old be retired by now, yet he’s straight-setting Andy in Wimbledon”

      Nadal’s fans: “Djokovic must be doping. He went from retiring from matches to beating my favorite player in 7 consecutive finals including 3 slam finals. Also, Rafa has never taken anything, he works hard, [and Federer, the one who never sweats, the iron-man of Tennis is a likely doper as well]”

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      Shadow, you're right that discussing or voicing suspicions about doping on the popular forums is grounds for banishment. At least the owners of this blog don't make a habit of banning people. It's entirely up one to decide if they have the time to post here or not.

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    18. @Shadow

      Thanks for the heads up. You are right about this place being mainly a hub of Federer fans to accuse Nadal and lately Djokovic while getting defensive whenever someone mentions Federer. I just wanted to bring this to the readers' notice, although I am sure most of them are already quite aware of it. I don't intend to waste my time posting here.

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    19. @JohnClarke I can say the same to you re. Nadal. you're just a fan of his who has come here to defend him and hate on Federer. So stop pointing fingers at the rest of us when you are doing the same. It's actually quite laughable. Just read what you've written here. Why don't you start your own blog entitled "Humble Nadal is Not a Doper" and then you can share fairy tales with people who see things your way.

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    20. I don't think John Clark is going anywhere; Seems to love stirring the pot too much. There could be paid diversionists in here sent in by who knows who to divert attention from the real problems.
      There are archives here that document with photos and references the probable usage of steroids among countless players.
      I have been in the game all my life, playing viewing coaching, a considerable amount of time. I believe modern game players are riddled with TUEs, because of the brutish nature of the modern game. Thank God for the 25% of the top 100 male players who happen to have the classic game, because they keep the men's game interesting. (More than half of those are in the top fifty players with several of those in the top twenty!) The women's game by contrast has become more of a boring slugfest because there is only a 4% by comparison number of classic players in the top 100. (Though at least two of those are in the top fifteen women). Someone reminded us that players like Connors and Rosewall were in slam finals at the ripe 'old' ages of 39 and 41 If I remember correctly; not to mention that when 'Open Tennis' first took off, many of the better known players were well into their thirties already.
      I could break the classic backhand down backhand to you in a number of sentences on this blog if it were appropriate, but suffice it to say that it is very like the umpire calling safe when a baseball player slides in, utilizing at least a few different forces including centripetal, centrifugal and the power of resistance. It is not only a graceful, artistic, wonderful shot to view and admired endlessly by all kinds of talking heads, but it is also an effortless source of power for the player who can tee off on the backhand when he has mastered the technique and is confident in it.
      A so-called two-fisted backhand requires complete effort in repetitively slugging away at endless balls, straining core muscles requiring extra steps to get to and from shots... You can ignore this difference if you like, but it's very real. Federer's father is/was an executive in a major drug company. I believe there is enough intelligence in that family that they would warn their son off of such sucker drugs as steroids are.
      Any forum is a great place to stand up for Federer because he is a class act, who is probably the greatest ambassador Tennis has now, maybe ever, based on his sportsmanship, obvious love of the game, and unparalleled respect by other players, as well as his mastery of the classic game which should never, ever die, though the brain trust of tennis tried their best to kill it and have not yet stopped doing so. This may never come out to the light of day, but I hope it will in the unmasking of all the other scandals related to our beloved sport. In their lust to push Tennis up there on a level of popularity with football, baseball and basketball, people entrusted with the reins of power in at least one of the main tennis teaching organizations in the US, for example, mandated that all their people teach a two-handed backhand to their players. I was no longer in this organization when I heard about this but I could not believe my ears, as I never stopped training players with the bread-and-butter backhand that I learned as a child and l never will. That with open stance pivot foot which allows one to tee off on both sides is a completely low stress way of performing in this sport.
      Beyond that for a clean player to have to go up against an obviously juiced one is a travesty and I would like to see it end, period! (Not to mention the horrible message it sends to younger players.)

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  4. Since the start of 2013, Bob Bryan has been tested twice as often as his twin, and more often than even Serena!

    Very hard to believe that he's not being targeted for some reason.

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    1. Targeted, or just more easy to get hold of, or given a second chance,... Who knows! I want to see big mouth Nadal's results getting away with three sets in 80 minutes today.

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  6. Apparently Lepchenko tested positive for Meldonium at the Australian Open, but it wasn't announced. She played a couple of tournaments (Dubai and Doha) in February and then was subsequently absent for 2 months citing a knee injury. She's now back on tour.

    www.nytimes.com/2016/05/25/sports/tennis/reports-of-positive-test-dog-varvara-lepchenko.html

    -

    I think that her case was perhaps similar to Sergey Betov's, the only difference being after he was cleared the ITF released a statement whilst in Lepchenko's case they remained silent.

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  7. In light of Murray's win against Stepanek, here is the stat for overcoming 0-2 sets deficit for the big 4.

    Murray - 9 times
    Federer- 9 times
    Djokovic- 4 times
    Nadal- 3 times

    Murray's comment that some players just don't go away might be more appropriate for himself and Federer. If it was other way round, that is if Nadal or Djokovic had led this table by a fair margin, we would have gone apeshit over it. But now it is all talent and grace.

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    1. Why don't you also post their 5 set record:

      Djokovic: 27 - 8 (77.1%)
      Murray: 20 - 7 (74.1%)
      Nadal: 17 - 7 (70.8% - used to be higher, but has slightly reduced thanks to Fognini & Verdasco's performance.)
      Federer: 23 - 19 (54.8%)

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    2. What's more telling is how they recover after a five setter. Whereas Djokovic and Nadal seems to start the next match fresh as a daisy, Murray and Fed seem to show the effects. Case in point today, with Murray looking frazzled and struggling against the world no 164 in his second round match after a five setter.

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    3. @Northwesticircus

      Not really. Djokovic looked quite frazzled in the Wimbledon 2013 final after the long 5 setter in semi. He did not look fresh as a daisy in last year's french open final too. I remember Nadal looking tired in the 2009 Madrid final or even AO 2009 final even though he ended up winning that mainly due to Federer's mental block.

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    4. @UntitledK9

      I fully knew that this stat would come up as soon as I post this and that is mainly the reason why I posted it in the first place. Selective stats like these have often been used to target certain villains here, whereas if one looks deeper the perceived "saints" can also be questioned. The common procedure is to build evidence based on a conclusion. For example, the conclusion is that Nadal is a doper. So when he's not playing well after a surgery, it must be the bio passport. But after struggling for more than a year on tour, he finally starts playing a little better on his favorite surface-- it has already been decided that he's found a way to beat the system.

      I have followed this place for a while and I believe it is a great place to express genuine concerns about the sport. But unfortunately, this place has been turned into a forum to bitch about a couple of players who beat Federer. It seems to have lost its purpose and that's sad.

      Anyway I am not in a position to change things here. I felt I needed to say this. Now I am out. Have fun!

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    6. "I fully knew that this stat would come up as soon as I post this and that is mainly the reason why I posted it in the first place"

      Then you should know that both sets of stats go hand in hand. From your posts on this site it seems you're more irked about the fact that when the topic of PEDs in Tennis is mentioned, Djokovic and Nadal are always viewed as the prime suspects, and with good reason.

      Does that mean Federer and Murray certainly are certainly clean? No it doesn’t. But it's like you said "evidence based on a conclusion" and there's a reason why Nadal has been suspected of being a drugs cheat since 2006; when Journal du Dimanche first reported that Nadal was a client of Fuentes as his name appeared on a list that was given to the International Cycling Union by the Spanish judicial authorities.

      "Anyway I am not in a position to change things here. I felt I needed to say this. Now I am out."

      Then stick to Mens Tennis Forums, it will be a nice home for you. More time can be spent there defending your favorite player and insulting the players you're not fond of.

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    7. Funnily enough, just as we speak, Murray just won second "come from behind" 5 setter, playing 3 days in a row on clay-- but hey he's clean! Imagine Djokovic or Nadal doing exactly the same thing. This place would explode lol. Murray basically does everything like Djokovic, just not as well. But he gets a free pass because he does not beat Federer at majors. If he had done that, denied Federer a few majors like Nadal and Djokovic have, he would have also joined their company. ;)

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    8. @UntitledK9

      "when Journal du Dimanche first reported that Nadal was a client of Fuentes as his name appeared on a list that was given to the International Cycling Union by the Spanish judicial authorities."

      Please provide proof of this. If this is true, the magazine would have followed this up. There was nothing from them after that initial report.

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    9. Hey, didn't you just promise you were out of here?

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    11. Back-to-Back 5 set wins for Murray at Roland Garros, he gets a bump to 22-7 (76%). However against as the World #2 playing against #126 and #164 he really should not have gone to 5.

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    12. *However as the world #2*

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    13. It seems you cannot provide the proof I asked which was expected because it was a rumor piece in a not-so-popular tabloid without any basis. That is how I remember it. There is no need to try and add credibility now after 10 years through "list provided by Spanish authorities". The same magazine also wrote articles accusing Ferrero, Corretja etc, again without any proof.

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    14. The article was in print, so it's not as if I provide an online link. However the information was picked up by others, google can help you out:

      https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=%22Les+noms+du+tennisman+Rafael+Nadal+(ATP+2)%22

      Gist:

      “Les noms du tennisman Rafael Nadal (ATP 2) et de cinq footballeurs du Real Madrid seraient notamment également sur la liste transmise à l'Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) par les autorités judiciaires espagnoles

      “Dans une brève parue dans le Journal du Dimanche, le président de l'uci, Pat mcquaid affirme que les noms de nombreux joueurs de football et de tennis, de nageurs et d'athlètes figureraient sur la fameuse liste. Le journal dominical cite également des sources espagnoles.
      --
      “The names of the tennis player Rafael Nadal (ATP 2 ) and five players from Real Madrid would include also on the list sent to the International Cycling Union (UCI) by the Spanish judicial authorities.

      “In a brief published in the Journal du Dimanche, the UCI president , Pat mcquaid says the names of many football and tennis, swimmers and athletes reportedly on the famous list . The Sunday newspapers also cites Spanish sources.

      After Journal Du Dimanche’s initial report, the Spanish sports council at the time immediately denied that Tennis Players and Footballers were on the list. The ITF then took them at their word:

      President Francesco Ricci Bitti said: "All top players are tested regularly."
      He added: "We have contacted the appropriate Spanish authorities and have been assured in writing by the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science that no tennis players, either Spanish or foreign, are under investigation.
      http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/front_page/5137228.stm

      Obviously, this was proven to be a lie as Fuentes himself confirmed that of his 200 clients 20% were tennis Players and another 20% were footballers. As for they not following it up, it’s not up a news publication to clean up a sport, that’s up to the governing body. The UCI, took some action (even though they didn’t punish all cyclists implicated), other governing bodies did not.

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    15. "However against as the World #2 playing against #126 and #164 he really should not have gone to 5."

      This is a salient point. Murray seems prone to dropping sets and getting embroiled in five setters in the earlier rounds. Why? Maybe because he isn't as clinical at dispatching the lower ranked players, but also because he can't play with the same insane intensity as Nadal/Djokovic across 3+ hours. The point is, 5-set records become a less meaningful doping signal if they're bolstered by beating players you should be handily beating anyway. And indeed players who are not used to playing best of five matches, like Mathias Bourgue today or even Stepanek who was out injured most of last year.

      Would be interesting to see how their 5-set records compare if you strip out opponents outside the top 20, but even then you'd have to look at the circumstances surrounding the individual matches.

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    16. @UntitledK9

      You proved my point that it was a rumor. There was no such list provided by Spanish authorities which contained his name. If there was one, it would have been a big story in the world media, not a rumor published by some unknown French tabloid. The story does not even claim that there is a list and it has his name, it predicts whose name would be on that list lol. Pretty laugh-worthy to use that as a proof.

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    17. "There was no such list provided by Spanish authorities which contained his name"

      I think you mean full list was never made public, as it was buried by the Spanish authorities who were trying to protect the biggest names in their sporting history.

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    18. Yes that is what I meant. If the list was never made public, the tabloid wouldn't have access to it (and they sure did not because their story was a prediction!) and it remains as a rumor. My point exactly!

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    19. You don't make any points exactly. You are a blunt instrument. Clumsy. Predictable. Repetitious. Unconvincing. Tedious.

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    20. The Fuentes doping list is quite real, and there are (hundreds of, I think) bloodbags of mostly spanish athletes. Real Madrid and Barcelona, plus cyclists and tennis players, are the majority on the list. To suggest that Nadal is the one top Spanish athlete, despite all his strange form and absences, who is not doping, is a more than little naive.

      Also, you can voice your opinion re Federer using intelligent argument all you like. I myself am open to the idea of Federer and Murray possibly doping, but personally I don't see the obvious signs like I do with: Djokovic, Nadal, Ferrer, Williams.

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    21. "This is a salient point. Murray seems prone to dropping sets and getting embroiled in five setters in the earlier rounds. Why? Maybe because he isn't as clinical at dispatching the lower ranked players, but also because he can't play with the same insane intensity as Nadal/Djokovic across 3+ hours. The point is, 5-set records become a less meaningful doping signal if they're bolstered by beating players you should be handily beating anyway. And indeed players who are not used to playing best of five matches, like Mathias Bourgue today or even Stepanek who was out injured most of last year"
      You're making two pair of contradicting points to support your 'position'. That Murray can't play consistently during the first 3 hours, but that he can in the next ones. And that he can't dispatch lower-ranked players as easy (false, as seen in most other slams) as the most hated players here, while stating that these low-ranked players self-destruct by nerves later on.

      That only proves that any reasoning is way too stretched to fit our very skewed ideas of who's doping and who's not. And this place is full of Federer fans, so it's only natural that Murray gets sympathy.

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    22. @Unknown
      "That Murray can't play consistently during the first 3 hours, but that he can in the next ones. "

      Momentum in a match as I'm sure you know, ebbs and flows. Murray is prone to the odd dip in form and concentration during a match, certainly more so than Nadal/Djokovic, and therefore has ended up playing more 5-setters against lower ranked players.

      My point is dropping sets to a player you should be beating doesn't seem a good indicator of doping, nor is eventually outlasting that same player, especially one who doesn't routinely doesn't play five setters at this level.

      "And that he can't dispatch lower-ranked players as easy."

      You disagree with that sentiment? Throughout his career, Murray has routinely spent more time on court by the time he meets Nadal/Djokovic/Fed at semi final stage. In fact, a "Murray rollercoaster" has been a trait of his from the start.

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  8. Who actually thinks that 9 matches is a lot in 352 matches played (at slams ) for Federer or 197 matches for Murray? Is this supposed to convince us that they're doping? LOL.

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    1. Are you impliying they should be free of suspicion, because you say so? Who do you think you are?

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    2. Please don't put words in my mouth. Where did I say they should be "free of suspicion"? The two concepts are not mutually exclusive. (i.e.: just because the stat is not a convincing one doesn't mean they are free of suspicion for perhaps other reasons). As far as the matter at hand, I have a right to my opinion. Last time I checked, this was a free world. Who do you think you are to say otherwise? To say that because a player has come back from two sets down to win in 9 matches over the course of 18 years is cause for concern is ludicrous. But I've read dumber things here believe it or not.

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  9. Tennis to announce provisional suspensions in future.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/tennis/2016/05/25/international-tennis-federation-to-change-anti-doping-procedures/

    Headline "International Tennis Federation to change anti-doping procedures to stop the 'silent ban" is misleading, as this does not pertain to what most fans think of as a silent ban. It only refers to announcing adverse analytic finding in advance of tribunal adjudication that the athlete was judged to be guilty of an anti-doping rule violation. This is not at all the same as suspending an athlete for an ADRV, but keeping that sanction secret.

    I'm all for increased transparency, but not announcing provisional suspensions in advance of a tribunal is that big of a huge step forward, IMHO.

    There are lots of other things that the ITF could do that would be more impactful.

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    1. Some improvements. But let's be honest, if the likes of Nadal/Djokovic/Federer/Murray/Williams ever test in the coming future after this has been implemented, will it be announced? I don't think so.

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    2. WADA are aware of all AAFs (even though samples are analyzed anonymously). They have the power to question how postives are handled by the sport.

      Hiding a positive from a top player would essentially require WADA collusion, or a convincing inappropriate TUE (which didn't work in the case of our DHEA friend). This is why I question the concept of a 'silent ban' or concealing a provisional suspension moving forward. Not saying it's impossible, but I suspect it's harder than people think to fudge these issues.

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    3. Sorry arcus, I meant if those elite players ever tested *positive*, will it be revealed to the public? I guess the collusion then will be between the ITF and the NADOs.

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    4. I understood what you meant, UntitledK9... I was referring to the situation both before and after the current ITF change of procedure.

      If an elite player has an AAF in the future, and the ITF fail to make it public (as they've promised to do from now on), WADA will be aware of this fact, and have to either choose to ignore the situation or call them out.

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  10. Meanwhile Venus Williams, despite her alleged health problems (sjogren's syndrome and a leg injury) is playing stellar tennis and is through to the 3rd round at RG. But no one seems to think that's suspect. Oh, and she's going to be 36 in a month.

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